Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Science and Mathematics Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Science and Mathematics Education

Algebra, Calculus, And The Act, Alex S. Krysl Apr 2017

Algebra, Calculus, And The Act, Alex S. Krysl

Honors Theses AY 16/17

It is a common saying that “the hardest part of calculus is the algebra”. Unfortunately, I found that many students lack the necessary, prerequisite algebra skills and knowledge in order to utilize completely the novel calculus concepts learned. For calculus to be effective, algebraic manipulation presents itself as an essential precondition.

As an example, students apply exponent rules throughout the whole differentiation and integration process—like the power rule. For students who lacked a solid background or basis in algebraic concepts like exponent rules, factoring, rewriting equations, and graphing functions, I observed their learning taking place in the calculus classroom ...


Developing Conceptual Understanding And Procedural Fluency In Algebra For High School Students With Intellectual Disability, Andrew J. Wojcik Jan 2017

Developing Conceptual Understanding And Procedural Fluency In Algebra For High School Students With Intellectual Disability, Andrew J. Wojcik

Theses and Dissertations

Teaching students with Intellectual Disability (ID) is a relatively new endeavor. Beginning in 2001 with the passage of the No Child Left Behind Act, the general education curriculum integrated algebra across the K-12 curriculum (Kendall, 2011; National Governors Association Center for Best Practices & Council of Chief State School Officers, 2010), and expansion of the curriculum included five intertwined skills (productive disposition, procedural fluency, strategic competence, adaptive reasoning, and conceptual understanding) (Kilpatrick, Swafford, & Findell, 2001). Researchers are just beginning to explore the potential of students with ID with algebra (Browder, Spooner, Ahlgrim-Delzell, Harris & Wakeman, 2008; Creech-Galloway, Collins, Knight, & Bausch, 2013; Courtade, Spooner, Browder, & Jimenez, 2012; Göransson, Hellblom-Thibblin, & Axdorph, 2016). Most of the research examines the development of procedural fluency (Göransson et al., 2016) and few researchers have explored high school level skills. Using a single-case multiple-baseline across participants design, the study proposes to teach two algebra skills to six high school students with ID, creating an equation (y=mx+b) from a graph of a line and creating a graph from an equation. The six high school students with ID will be recruited from a school district in central Virginia. The intervention package modeled after Jimenez, Browder, and Courtade (2008), included modeling, templates, time delay prompting, and a task analysis. Results showed that all six individuals improved performance during intervention for the target skills over baseline; results also indicated that in three out of the six cases some generalization to the inverse skill occurred without supplemental intervention. The ability of individuals with ID to generalize the learning without intervention provides some evidence that individuals with ID are developing conceptual understanding while learning procedural fluency.


The Intertwinement Of Activity And Artifacts: A Cultural Perspective On Realistic Mathematics Education, Frederick A. Peck Jan 2015

The Intertwinement Of Activity And Artifacts: A Cultural Perspective On Realistic Mathematics Education, Frederick A. Peck

School of Education Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Realistic mathematics education (RME) is guided by the notion that mathematics is the human activity of mathematizing the world. In much of the RME literature, mathematizing is theorized to be an individual activity, and the products of mathematizing—mathematical productions and mathematical knowledge—are theorized to be individual constructions and private knowledge. In this dissertation I extend these ideas and discuss how mathematizing is mediated by, and distributed across, cultural artifacts. I therefore argue for the importance of adopting a cultural perspective within RME. My arguments are theoretical and empirical. My empirical argument is drawn from design-based research in high-school ...


Investigating The Relationship Between High School Technology Education And Test Scores For Algebra 1 And Geometry, Richard R. Dyer, Philip A. Reed, Robert Q. Berry Apr 2006

Investigating The Relationship Between High School Technology Education And Test Scores For Algebra 1 And Geometry, Richard R. Dyer, Philip A. Reed, Robert Q. Berry

STEMPS Faculty Publications

The standards-based reform movement in education that began in the 1980s has evolved. In the 1990s, the focus was on producing subject-area content standards and modifying instruction. Today, the focus has shifted to assessment, and for technology education, demonstrating the impact on children and the efficacy of the discipline within general education. The purpose of this study was to compare the Standards of Learning (SOL) End-of-Course mathematics performance of high school students who completed courses in illustration and design technology to students who have not completed an illustration and design technology course. The following research questions were developed for this ...


Mechanized Mathematics, Britton Wood Jan 1964

Mechanized Mathematics, Britton Wood

Education and Human Development Master's Theses

The widespread availability of information requires people to know a lot more than was necessary in the past to qualify as educated citizens. Population growth, however, has made it difficult for education systems to meet their students’ learning needs. This paper examines changes in education methods, focusing on technology-based learning, or “teaching machines”. The researcher evaluated "programed learning” by juxtaposing two 9th grade algebra classes—a 30 member experimental group and a 32 member control group. The experimental group received “programed learning” instruction while the control group was taught using traditional methods. A post-test was administered at the program ...