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Full-Text Articles in Education

Women As Leaders In Higher Education: Blending Personal Experience With A Sociological Viewpoint, Dolores E. Cross Sep 1994

Women As Leaders In Higher Education: Blending Personal Experience With A Sociological Viewpoint, Dolores E. Cross

Trotter Review

A theme often repeated in the writings of C. Wright Mills is that of the "sociological imagination." What prompts our sociological imagination, he says, is a blending of our knowledge about the social sciences with our personal history. In my experience, it is important for leaders to have a sociological imagination. What follows are observations of my experience during my tenure as president of the New York State Higher Education Services Corporation (HESC), and in my current position as president of Chicago State University.


Expanding The Pool Of Women And Minority Students Pursuing Graduate Study: The Development Of A National Model, Bernard W. Harleston Sep 1994

Expanding The Pool Of Women And Minority Students Pursuing Graduate Study: The Development Of A National Model, Bernard W. Harleston

Trotter Review

The underrepresentation of women and minority students in certain disciplines in the graduate schools of American colleges and universities is a matter of great national concern. This concern has been intensified by the decline during the last fifteen years, especially from 1978 to 1988, in graduate school enrollments of all categories of American students. But, even before this most recent period of decline and during a time when the enrollment of women and minority students was at its highest (between 1968 and 1974, as a consequence, primarily, of the civil rights movement), the representation of women and minorities in the ...


An Investigation Into The Gender Bias Issue, Bonnie L. Wolcott Aug 1994

An Investigation Into The Gender Bias Issue, Bonnie L. Wolcott

Education and Human Development Master's Theses

Women tend to hold a smaller population within the fields of science and mathematics than men. This is believed to be largely due to gender bias coming from family, school, and society. The areas of math and science are largely considered to be male-oriented, and female students consider the fields to be largely unavailable to them. This master thesis addresses this topic by surveying a large number of high school math students, and interviewing school faculty.

A large suburban school district in Rochester, NY was used for this research. The study included 285 male students and 343 female students in ...


"Education For Service": Gender, Class, & Professionalism At The Boston Normal School, 1870-1920, Ann Froines Jan 1994

"Education For Service": Gender, Class, & Professionalism At The Boston Normal School, 1870-1920, Ann Froines

Women’s and Gender Studies Faculty Publication Series

"Education for Service," and “The Truth Shall Make You Free,” are two aphorisms engraved in granite over doorways of the Boston Normal School (BNS) buildings on Huntington Avenue in Boston. One can argue that the history of women in the teaching profession, its paradoxical and conflicted reality, are reflected in the complex and contradictory meanings of these two aphorisms. Young women students at BNS were moving toward greater freedom or autonomy by taking advantage of the educational opportunity available to them in this city-supported, tuition-free teacher training institution. At the same time, they were providing a crucial social service sanctioned ...


Active Latter-Day Saint Working Mothers: Their Effect On Their Daughters' Future Plans, Nissa C. Bengtson Allred Jan 1994

Active Latter-Day Saint Working Mothers: Their Effect On Their Daughters' Future Plans, Nissa C. Bengtson Allred

Theses and Dissertations

This research looks at the effect employed active LDS mothers have on their daughters' future plans for education, career, marriage, and children. Mothers' educational level, type of employment, and daughters' attachment to the LDS church were taken into consideration. It was found that a majority of daughters are definite in their plans for education, career, marriage, and children regardless of the employment status of their mother. Daughters of employed LDS mothers are more definite in their plans for a career than daughters of unemployed LDS mothers. No effect was found for mothers' employment on daughters' future plans for college, marriage ...