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Women

Journal of Social Theory in Art Education

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Voices Of Women: Telling The Truth Through Art Making, Alice Pennisi Jan 2006

Voices Of Women: Telling The Truth Through Art Making, Alice Pennisi

Journal of Social Theory in Art Education

On Wednesdays, when the last period of the school day is finished, the students trickle out of room 412 of Burnham High School and the young women enter who have been waiting outside. They immediately push all the desks to the side or back walls, leaving a large open space. Then each carries a chair toward the front of the room, creating a circle. Someone closes the door, and they begin to talk with one another. Thus begins a weekly meeting of Voices of Women (VOW), a group comprised mainly of high school girls who create collaborative artwork based on ...


Imaged Voices—Envisioned Landscapes: Storylines Of Information-Age Girls And Young Women, Marjorie Manifold Jan 2004

Imaged Voices—Envisioned Landscapes: Storylines Of Information-Age Girls And Young Women, Marjorie Manifold

Journal of Social Theory in Art Education

In Information Age societies around the world, adolescents are storylining-that is, creating and sharing their own stories and images of who they are and how they would like to be in the world. The youth meet in real or cyber spaces to plan, write, and illustrate stories that incorporate either originally conceived characters or adapt characters from published sources. Insofar as these young people intimately identify with the characters of their stories, story lining may be understood as a kind of socio-aesthetic play. By projecting pieces of themselves into the fictive characters of the collaborative story, they are practicing, correcting ...


The Perception Of Non-Perception: Lessons For Art Education With Downcast Eyes (Part One: Trompe-L’Oeil And The Question Of Radical Evil), Jan Jagodzinski Jan 1997

The Perception Of Non-Perception: Lessons For Art Education With Downcast Eyes (Part One: Trompe-L’Oeil And The Question Of Radical Evil), Jan Jagodzinski

Journal of Social Theory in Art Education

The Roman historian Pliny recounts a story that occurred during Periclean Athens. I will utilize this story, as a trope to undertake an interrogation of perception as it is commonly understood and currently practiced by art educators in schools. In order to deconstruct vision/blindness, or the perception/non-perception binary, I have examined the psychoanalytic paradigm of Jacques Lacan. His current interpreters provided the conceptual tools for such an undertaking. Given that the question of representation has become a key sign-post of postmodernism, art educators must conceptualize a trajectory for itself in the 21st century. Part One of such a ...


When Art Turns Violent: Images Of Women, The Sexualization Of Violence And Their Implications For Art Education, Yvonne Gaudelius, Juliet Moore Jan 1996

When Art Turns Violent: Images Of Women, The Sexualization Of Violence And Their Implications For Art Education, Yvonne Gaudelius, Juliet Moore

Journal of Social Theory in Art Education

Approximately two years ago, after viewing a slide of Rubens’ The Rape of the Daughters of Leucippus, a group of students enrolled in an “art for elementary education majors” course were asked to write an interpretation of this work, as part of a series of art criticism activities that they had engaged in through the semester. Most of the students wrote what might be described as reasonable interpretations in that they discussed the work in formal terms and made judgments about the artwork. However, and this is what is of interest to us in this paper, only two students in ...


Discussion And Depictions Of Women In H.W. Janson’S History Of Art, Fourth Edition, Paul E. Bolin Jan 1996

Discussion And Depictions Of Women In H.W. Janson’S History Of Art, Fourth Edition, Paul E. Bolin

Journal of Social Theory in Art Education

During the past twenty-five years there have been numerous highly charged and open criticisms levied against the field of art history. These accusations have been launched from a variety of fronts, both within and outside the discipline of art history (Simmons, 1990), with some of these critical questions and subsequent condemnation directed toward textbooks used to teach this subject in traditional courses that survey historical aspects of Western art. A primary criticism of these survey textbooks has been aimed at their lack of attention given to the important work of women artists. The manner in which these criticisms are treated ...


Visibility And Invisibility In Art And Craft, Fiona Blaikie Jan 1993

Visibility And Invisibility In Art And Craft, Fiona Blaikie

Journal of Social Theory in Art Education

The visibility and invisibility or censorship of art and craft is determined by individual and group ontologies. Their production has often been constricted and/or defined by gender, class, culture, race, religion, and politics. In this paper, I am concerned with the visibility of varieties of art, design, and craft. I will examine censorship based on three criteria; gender, culture, and class, with the censorship of artwork because of gender being the dominant theme.


Feminist Film Theory And Art Education, Michael J. Emme Jan 1991

Feminist Film Theory And Art Education, Michael J. Emme

Journal of Social Theory in Art Education

Every ten years or so, lonely voices make themselves heard in the art education literature shouting something like ‘Pay attention to the “newer media” (Lanier, 1966, p.7), or ‘Have you heard? There a “new image world” (Nadaner, 1985, p.9) out there.’ One writer even suggested that “directed, critical inquiry of [television] will extend knowledge in art and aesthetics and enhance the quality of peoples’ lives (Degge, 1985, p.85) Despite these sporadic exhortations, Jaglom and Gardner’s (1981) observation that “our culture has not yet invented ways of presenting [the mass media] or teaching its structure to children ...


The Names Quilt And The Art Educator’S Role, Doug Blandy, Karen Branen, Kristin G. Congdon, Laurie E. Hicks Jan 1991

The Names Quilt And The Art Educator’S Role, Doug Blandy, Karen Branen, Kristin G. Congdon, Laurie E. Hicks

Journal of Social Theory in Art Education

During October of 1989, more than 9,000 individual memorial quilt panels were collected and displayed in Washington, D.C. by the NAMES Quilt Project. The panels, covering the equivalent of nine football fields, made public the grief of thousands of individuals and families whose loved ones have died of AlDS. This quilt, the NAMES Quilt, is an international effort to create a living visual memory of the devastation that the AIDS virus has inflicted on those who have died from the disease and those who have been left behind to grieve.


Feminism As Metaphor, Amy Brook Snider Jan 1990

Feminism As Metaphor, Amy Brook Snider

Journal of Social Theory in Art Education

When I was first invited to be on a panel discussing “Men in Feminism," my only thoughts on the topic were, "Sure, we need men in feminism. Feminism is a way of looking at the world, so why not!" But then I continued to myself how could I be a spokeswoman for men? Maybe only men are in a position to talk about the subject, Perhaps if I read the book. Men in Feminism, the selection of presentations from two sessions of an MLA Conference in 1984 which inspired this panel, I'd have more to say about the topic ...


Queen-Of-The-Mountain: A Game I Can Play, Ken Marantz Jan 1990

Queen-Of-The-Mountain: A Game I Can Play, Ken Marantz

Journal of Social Theory in Art Education

From the top, let it be known that I was dragged into this arena, persuaded to participate only out of friendship for the organizers. My avowed reluctance was a function of genuine puzzlement about my ability to add any notions of substance to an already overloaded panel (I objected to the number of panelists, concerned about front-end overload) and to concerns which to these simple-minded ears are far too academic for me to understand.


Here’S Looking At Us Looking At Us, Amy Brook Snider Jan 1989

Here’S Looking At Us Looking At Us, Amy Brook Snider

Journal of Social Theory in Art Education

This paper was an introduction to the mini-conference, “The Conference as Ritual: The Sacred Journey of the Art Educator,” organized by Harold Pearse, Cynthia Taylor and myself for the NAEA Convention in Los Angeles, April 1988. Art educators from Canada and the United States along with Dr. Michael Owen Jones, author and director of the Folklore and Mythology Center at UCLA (our non-participant observer) looked at our annual spring pilgrimage to various hotels in the United States from historical, psychological, philosophic, structural, and ethnographic perspectives. As the introduction to the mini-conference, my paper specifically recounts the ways that I, an ...


Art Educators’ Responsibility To Cultural Diversity: Or “Where Are You Goin Wid Alla My Stuff?”, Kristen G. Congdon Jan 1988

Art Educators’ Responsibility To Cultural Diversity: Or “Where Are You Goin Wid Alla My Stuff?”, Kristen G. Congdon

Journal of Social Theory in Art Education

The responsibility of art educators to recognize and study the art and context of as many populations as possible is examined in this article. Examples of how artistic expressions have been borrowed, used in different contexts and otherwise removed from their original cultural context are given, and examples of ways that art teachers can help to recognize origins and the artistic functions of many cultures are suggested. By placing art in its context and studying it as it changes, students may begin to understand the artistic source, appreciate the importance of the creative context, and begin to see multi-cultural dimensions ...


Toward An Aesthetic Androgynous Mentality In Society: A Personal View, Duke Madenfort Jan 1988

Toward An Aesthetic Androgynous Mentality In Society: A Personal View, Duke Madenfort

Journal of Social Theory in Art Education

When I was an adolescent, I spent an unusual amount of time, indoors, alone, drawing and painting. I preferred staying inside doing art to going outside and playing games like baseball and football with other boys. The fact that drawing and painting, as traditionally and conventionally practiced, are solitary acts and done mostly in studios away from the distractions of the outer world and the, to me, boring talk of "ordinary" people didn't bother me at all.


Understanding Popular Culture: The Uses And Abuses Of Fashion Advertising, Mary Stokrocki Jan 1988

Understanding Popular Culture: The Uses And Abuses Of Fashion Advertising, Mary Stokrocki

Journal of Social Theory in Art Education

Today's young people are bombarded by messages. They should be taught to evaluate what they hear, to understand how ideas are clarified or distorted, and to explore how the accuracy and reliability of an oral (visual) message can be tested (Boyer, 1983, p.92). Students are often manipulated by media messages and they are unaware of the uses and abuses of the media by advertisers. In many ways such manipulation makes students dependent on materialistic rewards, regardless of moral concern. As a remedy, Lanier (1966) advocates developing a critical consciousness, "an informed awareness of the social forces which oppress ...