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Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Technology

2013

SoTL Commons Conference

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Education

Mentorship: Competitive Advantage In A Global Marketplace, Doreen Sams, Robin Lewis, Rosalie Richards, Rebecca Mcmullen, Larry Bacnik, Jennifer Hammack, Catlin Powell Mar 2013

Mentorship: Competitive Advantage In A Global Marketplace, Doreen Sams, Robin Lewis, Rosalie Richards, Rebecca Mcmullen, Larry Bacnik, Jennifer Hammack, Catlin Powell

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Greater access to college education, owed in part to technology and globalization, has the potential to prepare students to thrive in the competitive job market. Competition for careers in the U.S. requiring highly educated, innovative employees is increasing. Hence, undergraduate education offerings must change to prepare U.S. students for both a competitive workforce requiring advanced research and analytical skills and as a stepping-stone towards successfully completing post-baccalaureate degrees. Several universities recognize the critical need for undergraduates to engage in research where they participate in real world experiences that cultivate the academic and professional aptitudes required for the global ...


Inter-Institutional Collaboration: The Anti-Mooc?, Anne Marchant, Karen Warren, Veronica Pejril Mar 2013

Inter-Institutional Collaboration: The Anti-Mooc?, Anne Marchant, Karen Warren, Veronica Pejril

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Inter-institutional collaborations are starting to occur with greater frequency. Collaboration allows institutions to leverage resources to best advantage and produces the opportunity for creativity and innovation. As examples: colleges may offer foreign language classes jointly to enroll enough students to be cost effective; universities may partner with non-profits to create rich experiential learning environments. While large-scale, distance education (�MOOCs�) have very useful applications, the authors propose that higher education should be harnessing technology in to develop effective, engaging, and often interdisciplinary learning communities through collaboration in which the lines between research and learning can be blurred. As participants in a ...