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Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

1986

Articles 1 - 14 of 14

Full-Text Articles in Education

G86-792 Spiders, David L. Keith, Stephen D. Danielson, Timothy P. Miller Jan 1986

G86-792 Spiders, David L. Keith, Stephen D. Danielson, Timothy P. Miller

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes the most common species of spiders found in Nebraska, including the black widow and brown recluse, and how to control them.

General Description and Habits

Spiders can be distinguished easily from insects. All spiders have two major body regions and four pair of legs; insects have three body regions and three pair of legs.

Spiders vary widely in color, shape, size, and habits. All produce venom that is poisonous to their normal prey. Few spiders are considered dangerous to humans, however. These animals are predaceous by nature and use their venom, which is injected through hollow fangs ...


G86-823 Rock Retaining Wall Construction, Richard K. Sutton, Don Steinegger Jan 1986

G86-823 Rock Retaining Wall Construction, Richard K. Sutton, Don Steinegger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Things to consider when constructing a rock retaining wall.

Each building site has terrain that lends itself to individualized design. Natural slopes, with changes of grade or planned changes in the overall grade may lead to more interesting and pleasing landscapes.

Straight lines or lines lending themselves to square, rectangular, or circular areas tend to develop into a formal landscape. Curved, sweeping lines are less formal and more relaxed. Home landscaping often attempts to develop an informal appearance.

A rock wall can increase the beauty of the site as well as add to the area's utility. Uneven terrain can ...


G86-824 Snow Mold Diseases Of Turfgrasses (Revised February 1991), John E. Watkins Jan 1986

G86-824 Snow Mold Diseases Of Turfgrasses (Revised February 1991), John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

How to identify, prevent, and control the principal snow molds of turfgrass in Nebraska.

Principal snow molds of Nebraska turfgrass are Fusarium patch (pink snow mold) and Typhula blight (gray snow mold). Of these two, Fusarium patch is usually the most prevalent and, due to the general lack of continuous snow cover during winter, probably the most damaging. Although snow molds occur on most types of turf grown in Nebraska, fine-leaved turf types are more often seriously injured than coarser lawn grasses.


G86-826 Irrigating Alfalfa (Revised October 1990), Delynn Hay Jan 1986

G86-826 Irrigating Alfalfa (Revised October 1990), Delynn Hay

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Alfalfa has certain water use characteristics. Knowing these and how to monitor soil moisture, apply water, manage irrigation, and schedule water application will help you grow a high quality crop.

Irrigation makes it possible to grow high quality alfalfa throughout Nebraska on a wide variety of soils. Alfalfa, relatively drought tolerant, will produce yields almost proportional to the amount of water available to the crop. This means that alfalfa will respond favorably to irrigation. Because of its longer growing season, the seasonal water requirement of alfalfa will be higher than for other crops.

Irrigation management must consider characteristics such as ...


G86-814 Using Ram Lambs For Breeding, Ted Doane Jan 1986

G86-814 Using Ram Lambs For Breeding, Ted Doane

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide explains how ram lambs can be most efficiently used in a breeding program and provides management suggestions for a successful program.

Are you planning to use a ram lamb this breeding season? If so, you should consider the capabilities and limitations of ram lambs.

It may be true that some well-grown, aggressive, vigorous, highly fertile ram lambs can settle 50 ewes and maybe more. However, these rams are exceptions. A good rule to follow for practical ram management is 15 to 20 ewes for a ram lamb and 35 to 50 ewes for a mature ram.


G86-815 Reproductive Problems In Rams, Alan R. Doster, Dale M. Grotelueschen Jan 1986

G86-815 Reproductive Problems In Rams, Alan R. Doster, Dale M. Grotelueschen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Systematic examination of all males to be used for breeding can prevent reproductive failure, minimize nonpregnant ewes, and increase numbers of lambs born early during lambing season.

The importance of using only highly fertile, healthy rams in breeding programs cannot be overemphasized. This is especially true in the case of small producers where only one ram is required. The ram represents an often neglected part of sheep production.


Heg86-208 Life Insurance Insights, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue Jan 1986

Heg86-208 Life Insurance Insights, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This guide defines life insurance, its purpose, who needs it, types of policies and companies, how to choose the right insurance, and offers suggestions for policyholders.

Life insurance touches nearly every man, woman and child in the country. Every week of the year, people buy almost a million life insurance policies.


G86-802 Banvel And 2,4-D Damge To Fieldbeans And Soybeans, Roger G. Wilson, Drew J. Lyon Jan 1986

G86-802 Banvel And 2,4-D Damge To Fieldbeans And Soybeans, Roger G. Wilson, Drew J. Lyon

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the effects of Banvel and 2,4-D on soybean and fieldbean growth and yield. Banvel and 2,4-D are two herbicides commonly used for postemergence control of broadleaf weeds in corn, wheat, sorghum, pastures, and around field margins. Both herbicides can be moved off target by windy conditions at the time of spraying, or they can volatilize after spraying at temperatures above 85°F and drift off target. Fieldbeans and soybeans are both sensitive to Banvel and 2,4-D, and even rates as low as 0.001 lb/acre (1/100th of the use rate) can cause ...


G86-807 Where Do Weeds Come From?, John Furrer, Robert G. Wilson Jan 1986

G86-807 Where Do Weeds Come From?, John Furrer, Robert G. Wilson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses weed seed entry and loss from the soil, and provides examples of the density and diversity of the soil weed seed population. Weed Seed in the Soil Most weeds owe their beginning to seed in the soil. The soil acts as a seed storage reservoir and a growth medium for weedy plants. The kind or species and numbers of seed in the soil is closely linked to the cropping history of the land. Grasslands contain seed associated with grassland plants and cropland contains seed affiliated with weeds growing on cultivated land. Grasslands that have been cultivated and ...


G86-821 Weaned Pig Management And Nutrition (Revised August 1992), Duane Reese, Mike Brumm Jan 1986

G86-821 Weaned Pig Management And Nutrition (Revised August 1992), Duane Reese, Mike Brumm

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Temperature, space, health considerations, dietary nutrient allowances, feeding management and more are covered here. The weaning age of pigs farrowed in Nebraska is variable. While the average age at weaning is about four weeks, the range is from two to eight weeks. However, industry surveys indicate that more than 50 percent of the pigs in the United States are weaned at 28 days of age or earlier, with the majority weaned between three and four weeks of age. This trend towards earlier weaning is expected to continue with advances in management, housing, health and nutrition. Earlier weaning (under 28 days ...


Heg86-205 Sewing Ups And Downs: Placement Of Fabric And/Or Garment Pieces For Machine Sewing, Anna Marie White Jan 1986

Heg86-205 Sewing Ups And Downs: Placement Of Fabric And/Or Garment Pieces For Machine Sewing, Anna Marie White

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes how to position fabric and garment pieces during construction to facilitate sewing and achieve a more professional look.

Sewing, like much of life, has its ups and downs. Sewing ups and downs might be thought of as successes or frustrations, but the ups and downs referred to here are intended to prevent frustration at the sewing machine during garment construction.


G86-775 Prussic Acid Poisoning, Norman Shcneider, Bruce Anderson Jan 1986

G86-775 Prussic Acid Poisoning, Norman Shcneider, Bruce Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Prussic acid poisoning and its treatment are discussed in this NebGuide, along with methods to reduce its occurrence.

Sudangrass, forage sorghum, and sorghum-sudangrass hybrids are often used for summer pasture, green chop, hay, or silage. Under certain conditions, livestock consuming these feedstuffs may be poisoned by prussic acid (HCN).

Exposure to excessive prussic acid--also called hydrocyanic acid, hydrogen cyanide, or cyanide--can be fatal. However, producers can manage and feed their livestock to avoid problems with prussic acid.


Heg86-209 Farm And Ranch Family Living Expenses--Taking Control, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue Jan 1986

Heg86-209 Farm And Ranch Family Living Expenses--Taking Control, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes how families with an irregular income can control living expenses through use of a budget and cash flow plan.

Although farm and ranch family living levels have improved and become more comparable to nonfarm families, there will always be some important differences between these families with respect to managing the family living expenses. Income is irregular for many farm and ranch families and, in the past few years, has been insufficient to maintain the farm/ranch and family at a reasonable level of living. This guide is designed to help the farm or ranch family take control ...


G86-789 Human Lice And Their Control, Shripat T. Kamble, David L. Keith, Wayne L. Kramer Jan 1986

G86-789 Human Lice And Their Control, Shripat T. Kamble, David L. Keith, Wayne L. Kramer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide includes information on biology and control of three species of lice that infest humans.

Pediculosis (lice infestation) in humans has been known since ancient times. Three types of lice that infest humans: 1) head lice, 2) body lice, and 3) crab or pubic lice.

Lice are small, flat, dirty white to grayish black, wingless insects. Their legs are short and stout, with a large claw on each leg for grasping and holding onto hair. Lice have piercing and sucking mouth parts. These insects are blood feeders and require close contact with human hosts.