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Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

1982

Articles 1 - 8 of 8

Full-Text Articles in Education

G82-602 Predicting The Last Irrigation For Corn, Grain Sorghum And Soybeans (Revised August 1991), Norman L. Klocke, Dean E. Eisenhauer, Terry L. Bockstadter Jan 1982

G82-602 Predicting The Last Irrigation For Corn, Grain Sorghum And Soybeans (Revised August 1991), Norman L. Klocke, Dean E. Eisenhauer, Terry L. Bockstadter

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide presents criteria and "rules of thumb" for predicting the last irrigation for corn, grain sorghum and soybeans.

Determining when to apply the last irrigation of the season is an important water management decision. One extra irrigation may mean wasting an additional one to three inches of water and two to five gallons of diesel fuel per acre. On the other hand, applying that one extra irrigation could mean several bushels per acre in crop yield.


G82-600 Chimneys: Their Installation And Upkeep, Rollin D. Schnieder Jan 1982

G82-600 Chimneys: Their Installation And Upkeep, Rollin D. Schnieder

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Anyone who is thinking of putting in a wood stove has a lot of different things to consider. One of the most important is providing a good means for getting rid of combustion gases through some type of chimney. This may be a masonry chimney, some type of prefabricated chimney, or it may mean the repair of a chimney now on the house that may not have been used for many years.

All wood burning stoves need a tight, well-designed and properly constructed chimney to get rid of gases. This chimney must help in the efficient use of the stove ...


Ec82-1738 Tree Planting Guide, William R. Lovett, Bruce E. Bolander Jan 1982

Ec82-1738 Tree Planting Guide, William R. Lovett, Bruce E. Bolander

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Site Preparation

Proper site preparation is essential to your tree planting operation, and varies with the different climates and soil types.

Chemical Control: On sandy soils, rough terrain, or other highly erodible sites, tillage is not recommended. Chemical weed and/or grass killers may be applied to the site in the fall or before planting in the spring.

Summer Fallow: This practice is recommended on heavy soil in western Nebraska to conserve soil moisture. This may be accomplished with the aid of occasional disking, subsurface tillage, or chemicals to control weeds.

Fall Tillage: In the eastern areas of the state ...


G82-586 Effects Of Agricultural Runoff On Nebraska Water Quality, Elbert C. Dickey, Phillip Harlan, Don Vokal, C.J. Kisling-Crouch Jan 1982

G82-586 Effects Of Agricultural Runoff On Nebraska Water Quality, Elbert C. Dickey, Phillip Harlan, Don Vokal, C.J. Kisling-Crouch

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the effects of agricultural runoff on Nebraska water quality. Methods of controlling agricultural runoff are also examined.

The Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972 and the Clean Water Act of 1977 were written in response to a national concern for decreasing surface and groundwater quality. These laws set 1985 as a target date for eliminating pollutant discharges into navigable waters. An interim goal of the acts calls for "water quality which provides for the protection and propagation of fish, shell fish, and wildlife and provides for recreation in and on the water," where attainable, by ...


G82-601 Using Phosphorus Fertilizers Effectively, E.J. Penas, D.H. Sander Jan 1982

G82-601 Using Phosphorus Fertilizers Effectively, E.J. Penas, D.H. Sander

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

For most effective use of phosphorus, the fertilizer needs to be placed to ensure quick contact by growing roots and minimal contact with the soil.

Phosphorus (P) fertilizers are second only to nitrogen fertilizers in importance for growing crops in Nebraska. However, the principles affecting efficient phosphorus use are totally different. Nitrogen is a mobile nutrient both inside the plant and in the soil, while phosphorus moves very little in the soil. In addition, total plant phosphorus requirements are much lower than those of nitrogen. Plant leaves commonly contain ten times more nitrogen than phosphorus. However, phosphorus is concentrated in ...


G82-596 Use And Management Of Micronutrient Fertilizers In Nebraska, George W. Rehm, E.J. Penas Jan 1982

G82-596 Use And Management Of Micronutrient Fertilizers In Nebraska, George W. Rehm, E.J. Penas

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide focuses on the use of the micronutrients zinc and iron.

Of the 16 elements known to be essential for plant growth, 7 are used in very small amounts and are classified as micronutrients. These are zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), boron (B), molybdenum (Mo) and chlorine (Cl).

Micronutrients are supplied to plants from two sources: 1) soil minerals and 2) organic matter. They are released as the soil minerals break down over a period of time by weathering. The major portion of the micronutrients made available to plants, however, probably comes from the breakdown (mineralization ...


G82-587 Understanding Potassium For Crop Production In Nebraska, George W. Rehm Jan 1982

G82-587 Understanding Potassium For Crop Production In Nebraska, George W. Rehm

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the availability of and the need for potassium in Nebraska soils

Potassium (K) is an essential nutrient absorbed from soils by crops in relatively large amounts. Therefore, it is classified as a major nutrient. Although large amounts are absorbed, potassium is not necessarily needed in a fertilizer program. Numerous studies conducted with all major crops have definitely shown that adding potassium to a fertilizer program does not lead to yield increases on the large majority of soils in Nebraska.


G82-626 Air Properties: Temperature And Relative Humidity, David P. Shelton, Gerald R. Bodman Jan 1982

G82-626 Air Properties: Temperature And Relative Humidity, David P. Shelton, Gerald R. Bodman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes how to use a simplified psychrometric chart to better understand the relationships between air temperature and relative humidity.

Air is a vital component of our everyday lives. Air properties are important whether we are ventilating a livestock housing unit, drying grain, or determining relative humidity in the home. In a livestock building, temperature, moisture, odors, and toxic or noxious gases must be controlled. Since the moisture holding capacity of air increases with increasing temperature, heat may be added in grain drying to aid in removing moisture from the grain kernel. In the home, moisture can either be ...