Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Publications

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

1980

Articles 1 - 11 of 11

Full-Text Articles in Education

G80-510 Sagebrush Control, Robert G. Wilson, Patrick E. Reece Jan 1980

G80-510 Sagebrush Control, Robert G. Wilson, Patrick E. Reece

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Sagebrush is an all encompassing term commonly used to describe Artemisia species found on range and pasture lands in Nebraska. The dominant woody sagebrush species found in western Nebraska are sand sagebrush, fringed sagebrush, green sagewort, and big sagebrush. These species vary in appearance, distribution and control recommendations. All four species are perennials, have deep extensive root systems and flower in the latter part of the summer. The leaves of sagebrush have a strong odor as a result of camphor like compounds. Palatability and digestibility of sagebrush species found in Nebraska tend to be poor because of high volatile oil ...


G80-504 Proper Livestock Grazing Distribution On Rangeland (Revised February 1996), Jerry D. Volesky, Walter H. Schacht, Steven S. Waller Jan 1980

G80-504 Proper Livestock Grazing Distribution On Rangeland (Revised February 1996), Jerry D. Volesky, Walter H. Schacht, Steven S. Waller

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Good grazing distribution can increase harvest efficiency and grazing capacity. This NebGuide discusses common grazing problems and offers solutions.

The 23 million acres of rangeland in Nebraska are mostly grassland and are primarily devoted to forage production for Nebraska's multibillion dollar beef cattle industry. Nebraska's rangelands are inherently productive, and potential returns from efficient management practices are high for livestock producers.

Proper grazing distribution is a factor which can increase livestock production from Nebraska's rangeland. Grazing distribution refers to dispersion of grazing animals over a management unit. It is just one element of good grazing management which ...


G80-513 Protect Soil With Vegetative Residues, C,R, Fenster Jan 1980

G80-513 Protect Soil With Vegetative Residues, C,R, Fenster

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Keeping a protective cover of vegetative residues on the soil surface is the simplest and surest way to control both water and wind erosion.

Crop residues are vital to conservation of soil and water. Keeping a protective cover of vegetative residues on the soil surface is the simplest and surest way to control both water and wind erosion. Vegetative residues on the soil surface improve infiltration of water into the soil, reduce evaporation, and aid in maintaining organic matter. Residues left upright all winter trap snow which increases soil water.


G80-530 Brooder House And Equipment For The Home Flock, Earl W. Gleaves Jan 1980

G80-530 Brooder House And Equipment For The Home Flock, Earl W. Gleaves

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses housing and equipment needs for raising home poultry flocks.

This NebGuide lists and describes some of the types of houses and equipment that can be used to raise a home poultry flock. Other management suggestions are included in a series of NebGuides that are available from your county Extension office.


G80-524 Incubation For The Home Flock, Earl W. Gleaves Jan 1980

G80-524 Incubation For The Home Flock, Earl W. Gleaves

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide covers how to build and operate an incubator to hatch eggs for a home flock.

Various makes and models of commercial incubators are available for use by the home flock owner.


G80-486 Crickets (Revised June 1987), David L. Keith, Shripat T. Kamble Jan 1980

G80-486 Crickets (Revised June 1987), David L. Keith, Shripat T. Kamble

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Crickets: identification, damage, and control.

Crickets belong to the order Orthoptera, most members of which have enlarged hind legs, adapted for jumping. In addition, members of this group possess opaque, leather-like forewings that cover a pair of clear, membranous hindwings. Most crickets are nocturnal, whereas their grasshopper cousins are active only during the daytime. Members of the cricket family usually have very long antennae and their wings have the front margin folded sharply over the side of the body, giving them a "boxlike" appearance. Female crickets are characterized by having long, spear-shaped ovipositers, used for egg-laying.

Crickets are sometimes confused ...


G80-525 Drip Irrigation For Windbreaks, Walter L. Trimmer, Brian R. Chandler Jan 1980

G80-525 Drip Irrigation For Windbreaks, Walter L. Trimmer, Brian R. Chandler

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide contains information on designing and installing drip irrigation systems, which can help your trees become effective windbreaks at an earlier date than non-irrigationd trees.

Windbreaks can be a valuable asset to farmers ranchers and rural residents. A properly designed tree windbreak or shelterbelt provides protection for livestock, crops and farmsteads. A windbreak can also mean significant energy savings for heating a rural residence.

Drip or trickle irrigation can help establish successful tree plantings and help them become effective windbreaks at an earlier date than non-irrigationd trees. Drip irrigating windbreaks can mean significant labor savings and less water use ...


G80-531 Swine Manure Management Systems, Elbert C. Dickey, Mike Brumm, David P. Shelton Jan 1980

G80-531 Swine Manure Management Systems, Elbert C. Dickey, Mike Brumm, David P. Shelton

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide examines the advantages and disadvantages of various types of swine manure management systems. Manure management is an integral part of any swine production system and must be carefully considered when planning new or remodeled facilities. Manure management objectives may include 1) optimum nutrient retention and utilization; 2) minimum land, labor or capital requirements; 3) odor control; 4) animal and/or human health and performance considerations; or 5) some combination of these objectives. Because of differences in land availability, climate, capital, labor and management skills among producers, a single, best management system for manure cannot be defined.


G80-509 Canada Thistle, Robert G. Wilson Jan 1980

G80-509 Canada Thistle, Robert G. Wilson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The growth and control of Canada thistle is covered here.

Canada thistle plant

Canada thistle [Cirsium arvense (L) Scop.] is a native of Eurasia and was probably introduced to America around 1750. Since that time it has spread throughout the northern part of the United States. Canada thistle is estimated to infest 800,000 acres in northern and western Nebraska.

A perennial that reproduces from seed and by an extensive root system, Canada thistle is dioecious, with the male and female flowers on separate plants. For viable seed to be produced, both male and female plants need to be present.


G80-503 Vegetable Garden Seed Storage And Germination Requirements, Dale T. Lindgren Jan 1980

G80-503 Vegetable Garden Seed Storage And Germination Requirements, Dale T. Lindgren

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide has information on the selection and storage of vegetable garden seed.

A successful garden begins with the selection and use of high quality seed of adapted superior varieties. Start by purchasing seed from a reputable seed company. Save records of your seed orders, so if you do have a complaint you can contact the sales company. Saving records of your seed orders is also useful for keeping track of the varieties you planted.


G80-496 Tomatoes In The Home Garden, Laurie Hodges, Dale T. Lindgren, Susan Schoneweis Jan 1980

G80-496 Tomatoes In The Home Garden, Laurie Hodges, Dale T. Lindgren, Susan Schoneweis

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide outlines tomato rearing practices, cultivars and possible pest, disease and weed control problems.

Tomatoes come in a wide range of fruit colors, sizes, shapes and maturities. Ripe tomatoes may be red, yellow, orange, pink or even green. Shapes vary from globe or round to slightly flattened, pear-like or cherry-sized. Often consumers complain tomatoes purchased in grocery stores are lacking in flavor or have tough skin. In a home garden, you can grow the tomatoes you prefer, including a wide selection of fruit colors, flavors, textures and sizes. Although rumored, there is no direct link between fruit acidity and ...