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Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

1978

Articles 1 - 8 of 8

Full-Text Articles in Education

G78-390 Right Crop Stage For Herbicide Use Alfalfa, Sugarbeets, Soybeans, And Fieldbeans (Revised January 1987), Robert G. Wilson, Alex Martin Jan 1978

G78-390 Right Crop Stage For Herbicide Use Alfalfa, Sugarbeets, Soybeans, And Fieldbeans (Revised January 1987), Robert G. Wilson, Alex Martin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

If you are using herbicides on alfalfa, sugarbeets, soybeans, or fieldbeans, information in this Guide will help you apply them at the proper time for best weed control with a minimum of crop injury. Proper timing of postemergence herbicides is essential to achieve maximum weed control with minimum crop injury. As field crops grow and mature, their tolerance to herbicides changes. As a general rule, annual and biennial weeds are more susceptible to postemergence herbicides when they are in the seedling stage, becoming increasingly difficult to control as they mature. The grower is thus faced with the problem of when ...


G78-412 Guide For Controlling Insects On Pets (Revised December 1989), John B. Campbell, David L. Keith Jan 1978

G78-412 Guide For Controlling Insects On Pets (Revised December 1989), John B. Campbell, David L. Keith

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This guide is restricted to the most common insect pests of cats, dogs, rabbits, birds, guinea pigs, and gerbils.

Pets, like all animals, are subject to attack by certain insects. Sanitation around the area where pets are kept, cleanliness of the pets, good care and nutrition all help reduce the chance of a serious problem.


G78-421 How To Choose An Irrigation Consultant, James R. Gilley Jan 1978

G78-421 How To Choose An Irrigation Consultant, James R. Gilley

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Presented here are some guidelines and criteria to aid in the selection process for irrigation management assistance.

The complexity of agricultural technology makes it difficult for the farmer to apply this technology on a day-by-day basis. Refinement and application of agricultural technology in the field has generally been through industrial representatives and federal and state extension programs.


G78-393 Water Measurement Calculations (Revised November 1984), Dean E. Eisenhauer, Paul E. Fischbach Jan 1978

G78-393 Water Measurement Calculations (Revised November 1984), Dean E. Eisenhauer, Paul E. Fischbach

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Water measurement is an important tool for checking irrigation management skills. Irrigators can use one of several methods to measure water. To take advantage of water management data, a knowledge of water measurement calculations is important.

Units of Water Measurement

There are two conditions under which water is measured--at rest and in motion. Volume units are used for water at rest. Water in motion is described in units of flow.


G78-392 Selecting And Using Irrigation Propeller Meters (Revised May 1984), Dean E. Eisenhauer Jan 1978

G78-392 Selecting And Using Irrigation Propeller Meters (Revised May 1984), Dean E. Eisenhauer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the use of propeller type irrigation meters to monitor irrigation water use.

Measuring irrigation water is important in efficient water management. Measuring water can be used for the following purposes:

1. Checking irrigation efficiency

2. Determining pumping plant efficiency

3. Detecting well and pump problems


G78-409 Cattle Grub Control In Nebraska (Revised November 1989), John B. Campbell Jan 1978

G78-409 Cattle Grub Control In Nebraska (Revised November 1989), John B. Campbell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The control of cattle grubs is discussed here, as are possible insecticide reactions, warnings and restrictions.

Cattle grubs are the immature or larval stages of heel or warble flies. Losses from this insect begin with the fly stage in the insect's life history. As flies seek animals on which to deposit eggs, cattle become frightened and run. The running animal has its tail in the air, bent over the back. This behavior is termed "gadding."

Cattle fail to graze normally during the warble fly season because of gadding. They seek shade or stand in water to avoid the flies ...


G78-391 Controlling Poultry Insects, Robert E. Roselle, Earl W. Gleaves Jan 1978

G78-391 Controlling Poultry Insects, Robert E. Roselle, Earl W. Gleaves

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication contains information on the control of poultry insects. Poultry Lice Poultry lice are small, wingless insects with chewing mouthparts. The most common in Nebraska are brown chicken lice and chicken body lice. Less important are large chicken lice, shaft lice, chicken head lice, fluff lice, and several other species which are rarely present. Poultry Mites Several kinds of mites attack poultry. The most common are chicken mites and northern fowl mites. Occasionally scaley-leg mites are a problem.


G78-406 Fertilizing Grass Pastures And Haylands, Bruce Anderson, Charles A. Shapiro Jan 1978

G78-406 Fertilizing Grass Pastures And Haylands, Bruce Anderson, Charles A. Shapiro

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This article discusses managing nitrogen and using phosphorus and other nutrients for grass pastures and hay-lands. Pastures are important to many livestock producers in Nebraska, but production from many pastures is low. Research shows that fertilizing, weed control and rotational grazing increases grass production from pastures, resulting in greater livestock production. Fertilizing and controlling weeds on haylands also increases production. Since more plant material is removed when land is managed as hayland, more attention needs to be paid to fertilization. In addition to increasing grass production, fertilizing can improve forage quality. On-the-farm demonstrations show that fertilizing increases the amount of ...