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2006 Nebraska Farm Custom Rates - Part I, H. Douglas Jose Jan 2006

2006 Nebraska Farm Custom Rates - Part I, H. Douglas Jose

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Every two years a survey of custom operators is conducted to determine the current rates charged for specific machinery operations. The survey is divided into two parts: Part I includes spring and summer operations, including planting and small grains harvest, and in Part II information about fall and miscellaneous operations.


2006 Nebraska Farm Custom Rates - Part Ii, H. Douglas Jose Jan 2006

2006 Nebraska Farm Custom Rates - Part Ii, H. Douglas Jose

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Every two years a survey of custom operators is conducted to determine the current rates charged for specific machinery operations. The survey is divided into two parts: Part I includes spring and summer operations, including planting and small grains harvest, and in Part II information about fall and miscellaneous operations.


Ec06-219 2006 Nebraska Swine Report, Duane Reese Jan 2006

Ec06-219 2006 Nebraska Swine Report, Duane Reese

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The 2006 Nebraska Swine Report was prepared by the staff in Animal Science and cooperating Departments for use in Extension, Teaching and Research programs. This publications deals with research on swine reproduction, breeding, health, nutrition, economics, and housing.


Nf05-592 Both Partners Are Responsible For The Relationship, Kathy Bosch Jan 2005

Nf05-592 Both Partners Are Responsible For The Relationship, Kathy Bosch

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Both partners in a marriage are equally responsible for nurturing the relationship and "keeping the spark alive." Too often society has placed this responsibility on the woman when it should be equally shared. Women often have accepted the "caretaker" role partially because of their connectedness with children and family; however, both partners have a great stake in the well-being of the marriage and should care deeply about keeping the relationship viable and healthy. One person cannot strengthen the relationship alone. It takes two working together to strengthen the partner relationship.


Nf05-617 Guardianship Responsibilities To The Court, Eileen Krumbach, John Defrain, Bruce Cudly, Dina Rathje, Carol Lieske, Rene Ferdinand, Mary Evans, Mary Gordon Jan 2005

Nf05-617 Guardianship Responsibilities To The Court, Eileen Krumbach, John Defrain, Bruce Cudly, Dina Rathje, Carol Lieske, Rene Ferdinand, Mary Evans, Mary Gordon

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact, the second in a series, discusses legal guardianship.


Nf05-619 Decision Making As A Guardian, Eileen Krumbach, John Defrain, Bruce Cudly, Dina Rathje, Carol Lieske, Rene Ferdinand, Mary Evans, Mary Gordon Jan 2005

Nf05-619 Decision Making As A Guardian, Eileen Krumbach, John Defrain, Bruce Cudly, Dina Rathje, Carol Lieske, Rene Ferdinand, Mary Evans, Mary Gordon

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact, the fourth in a series, discusses legal guardianship and decision making.


Nf05-651 Learning From Children About Severe Weather, Leanne Manning, Dianne Swanson, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-651 Learning From Children About Severe Weather, Leanne Manning, Dianne Swanson, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

How children perceive severe weather and what adults can do to help them deal with their fears became the focus of this extension study.


G05-1563 Manure Incorporation And Crop Residue Cover: Part I: Reduction Of Cover, David P. Shelton Jan 2005

G05-1563 Manure Incorporation And Crop Residue Cover: Part I: Reduction Of Cover, David P. Shelton

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Residue cover reduction caused by soil-engaging components typically used with tank spreaders and towed hose systems to apply liquid or slurry manure.

Manure incorporation represents a compromise between best management practices for soil erosion control and manure management. Manure should be incorporated into the soil for odor control, increased availability of nutrients, and control of potential manure runoff; however, disturbing the soil and crop residue may increase soil erosion and water runoff. This NebGuide summarizes the results of a field study to determine the influences on crop residue cover of common equipment used to simultaneously apply and incorporate manure.


Ec05-219 2005 Nebraska Swine Report, Duane Reese Jan 2005

Ec05-219 2005 Nebraska Swine Report, Duane Reese

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The 2005 Nebraska Swine Report was prepared by the staff in Animal Science and cooperating Departments for use in Extension, Teaching and Research programs. This publications deals with research on swine reproduction, breeding, health, nutrition, economics, and housing.


G05-1557 Planning Your Riparian Buffer: Design And Plant Selection, Amanda Fox, Thomas G. Franti, Scott J. Josiah, Mike Kucera Jan 2005

G05-1557 Planning Your Riparian Buffer: Design And Plant Selection, Amanda Fox, Thomas G. Franti, Scott J. Josiah, Mike Kucera

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Learn how to plan and design a riparian buffer and select appropriate tree and grass species.

Conservation buffers are planted for environmental, aesthetic, recreational, and economic reasons. Grass filter strips, grassed waterways, field borders, and field windbreaks are examples of conservation buffers. A conservation buffer also may be a streamside or riparian forest buffer and include trees, shrubs, and grasses. Riparian buffers are a best management practice to protect stream water quality, reduce streambank erosion, and provide wildlife habitat. Buffers also can provide income through payments from federal, state and local cost-share programs or through production and sale of specialty ...


Nf05-621 Alternatives To Guardianship, Eileen Krumbach, John Defrain, Bruce Cudly, Dina Rathje, Carol Lieske, Rene Ferdinand, Mary Evans, Mary Gordon Jan 2005

Nf05-621 Alternatives To Guardianship, Eileen Krumbach, John Defrain, Bruce Cudly, Dina Rathje, Carol Lieske, Rene Ferdinand, Mary Evans, Mary Gordon

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact, the sixth in a series, discusses legal guardianship and alternatives to guardianship.


Nf05-620 Guardianship/Conservatorship Financial Responsibilities, Eileen Krumbach, John Defrain, Bruce Cudly, Dina Rathje, Carol Lieske, Rene Ferdinand, Mary Evans, Mary Gordon Jan 2005

Nf05-620 Guardianship/Conservatorship Financial Responsibilities, Eileen Krumbach, John Defrain, Bruce Cudly, Dina Rathje, Carol Lieske, Rene Ferdinand, Mary Evans, Mary Gordon

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact, the fifth in a series, discusses legal guardianship and related financial responsibilities.


Nf05-618 Guardianship Responsibilities To The Ward, Eileen Krumbach, John Defrain, Bruce Cudly, Dina Rathje, Carol Lieske, Rene Ferdinand, Mary Evans, Mary Gordon Jan 2005

Nf05-618 Guardianship Responsibilities To The Ward, Eileen Krumbach, John Defrain, Bruce Cudly, Dina Rathje, Carol Lieske, Rene Ferdinand, Mary Evans, Mary Gordon

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact, the third in a series, discusses legal guardianship.


Ec04-219 2004 Nebraska Swine Report, Duane Reese Jan 2004

Ec04-219 2004 Nebraska Swine Report, Duane Reese

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The 2004 Nebraska Swine Report was prepared by the staff in Animal Science and cooperating Departments for use in Extension, Teaching and Research programs. This publications deals with research on swine reproduction, breeding, health, nutrition, economics, and housing.


Nf04-595 Surveillance For Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, David R. Smith, Dicky D. Griffin Jan 2004

Nf04-595 Surveillance For Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, David R. Smith, Dicky D. Griffin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Veterinarians should consider BSE in their list of diagnostic differentials when cattle exhibit signs of behavioral changes, ataxia, or recumbency.


Nf04-593 Understanding How Usda-Fsis Determines The Age Of Cattle For Current Bse Regulations, Dicky D. Griffin, David R. Smith Jan 2004

Nf04-593 Understanding How Usda-Fsis Determines The Age Of Cattle For Current Bse Regulations, Dicky D. Griffin, David R. Smith

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses the key points used by USDA-FSIS veterinary inspectors to classify cattle as being under or over 30 months of age. Age helps determine which carcasses will be segregated for removal of "specified risk materials" associated with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE).


G04-1542 Planning An Intergenerational™ Dialogue, Laverne Barrett, Andrea J. Gage Jan 2004

G04-1542 Planning An Intergenerational™ Dialogue, Laverne Barrett, Andrea J. Gage

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Intergenerational Dialogues can help communities address important issues. This NebGuide offers guidance.

The Intergenerational™Dialogue

An Intergenerational™Dialogue is usually a one-day, six-hour event that allows the five living generations to come together to create an action plan to address a specific community issue. When all age groups of the community are involved in problem solving, it is easier to gain solution commitment and a greater response to planned action. Does this sound too good to be true? The following is a descriptive outline for planning an Intergenerational Dialogue in a community. The basis for the NebGuide is the work ...


G04-1537 Wind Erosion And Its Control, Drew J. Lyon, John A. Smith Jan 2004

G04-1537 Wind Erosion And Its Control, Drew J. Lyon, John A. Smith

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses how wind erosion occurs and presents methods for reducing wind erosion on land devoted to crop production. Wind erosion is widespread on agricultural land in the Great Plains, particularly in the semi-arid regions. Wind erosion physically removes the most fertile part of the soil (organic matter, clay, and silt) and lowers soil productivity. This loss in productivity increases the costs of producing crops. Blowing soil can reduce seedling survival and growth, depress crop yields, and increase the susceptibility of plants to certain types of stress, including diseases.


Nf04-591 What Is Genetic Engineering And How Does It Work?, Patricia M. Hain, Julie A. Albrecht, Douglas A. Golick Jan 2004

Nf04-591 What Is Genetic Engineering And How Does It Work?, Patricia M. Hain, Julie A. Albrecht, Douglas A. Golick

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Genetic engineering is the process of manually adding new DNA to an organism.


Nf411 Seed Treatment Fungicides For Soybeans, Loren J. Giesler Jan 2004

Nf411 Seed Treatment Fungicides For Soybeans, Loren J. Giesler

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Fungi can cause seed to rot. This publication describes treatments.


G1507 Summer Patch And Necrotic Ring Spot, John E. Watkins Jan 2003

G1507 Summer Patch And Necrotic Ring Spot, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes the causes, predisposing conditions, and symptoms of summer patch and necrotic ring spot, and provides recommendations for their control.

Introduction

Two of the most destructive turfgrass patch diseases are summer patch and necrotic ring spot, both of which are present in Nebraska. The symptoms of necrotic ring spot and summer patch are essentially identical, making it difficult to distinguish the two apart in an affected turf. If the symptoms begin in May, necrotic ring spot is probably the cause; if they begin in July and August, then summer patch is suspect. In Nebraska summer patch is probably ...


Ec03-153 Selecting Alfalfa Varieties For Nebraska, Bruce Anderson, Michael Trammell, Charles A. Shapiro, David D. Baltensperger Jan 2003

Ec03-153 Selecting Alfalfa Varieties For Nebraska, Bruce Anderson, Michael Trammell, Charles A. Shapiro, David D. Baltensperger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The most important variety decision on many farms and ranches is the selection of alfalfa. The choice of alfalfa variety affects production for three to ten or more years, whereas varieties of annual crops can be changed annually. Yield potential, pest resistance, and seed price should be considered when selecting alfalfa varieties in Nebraska.


Ec03-1569 Grasshopper Identification Guide For Cropland Grasshoppers: Summer Feeding Species, Ronald C. Seymour, Gary L. Hein, John B. Campbell, James A. Kalisch Jan 2003

Ec03-1569 Grasshopper Identification Guide For Cropland Grasshoppers: Summer Feeding Species, Ronald C. Seymour, Gary L. Hein, John B. Campbell, James A. Kalisch

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Summer feeding grasshoppers can cause severe damage to nearly all crops when they are abundant in field borders. Identification of the grasshoppers present is important because only four species are likely to cause significant crop damage. These four species are spur-throated grasshoppers that have a rounded head and a spur between their front legs. They are more common in weed-infested field borders and weedy adjacent pastures, but will move to cropland after consuming most of the weeds. Summer feeding grasshoppers overwinter as eggs and hatch through much of May and June.


Ec03-1568 Grasshopper Identification Guide For Rangeland And Pasture Summer Feeding Species, Ronald C. Seymour, John B. Campbell, Gary L. Hein, James A. Kalisch Jan 2003

Ec03-1568 Grasshopper Identification Guide For Rangeland And Pasture Summer Feeding Species, Ronald C. Seymour, John B. Campbell, Gary L. Hein, James A. Kalisch

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Many kinds of summer-feeding grasshoppers are found in Nebraska rangeland and pastures. Of these, the six species listed in this guide are most likely to be numerous during outbreak years. These species overwinter as eggs and hatch through much of May and June. When abundant they can cause severe damage to rangeland and pastures, especially when dry conditions limit grass growth. Identification of the species present is important because some have greater potential for damage than others.


Ec03-1567 Grasshopper Identification Guide For Rangeland Grasshoppers: Fall/Spring Feeding Species, Ronald C. Seymour, John B. Campbell, Gary L. Hein Jan 2003

Ec03-1567 Grasshopper Identification Guide For Rangeland Grasshoppers: Fall/Spring Feeding Species, Ronald C. Seymour, John B. Campbell, Gary L. Hein

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

On rare occasions, high population of early season range grasshoppers coincide with slow growth of spring grass, causing economic loss. Most early season range grasshoppers overwinter in the nymphal stage. These grasshoppers survive by hiding under debris and organic matter.


Mp03-81 The 2003 Nebraska Poultry Report, Sheila Scheideler, Mary M. Beck, Curtis L. Novak, Leanne Labrash, Danilo J. Franco, Mohammad A. Jalal, David Monsalve, Trish Weber Jan 2003

Mp03-81 The 2003 Nebraska Poultry Report, Sheila Scheideler, Mary M. Beck, Curtis L. Novak, Leanne Labrash, Danilo J. Franco, Mohammad A. Jalal, David Monsalve, Trish Weber

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The Nebraska Poultry Report is produced every two years by the Animal Science Department's poultry faculty with contributions from others in the University of Nebraska who work with avian species. The purpose of the report is to make our activities known to the poultry industries in Nebraska. The majority of articles are based on on-going research but are written in a relaxed style for ease of reading.


Nf152 Why Children Misbehave, Pat Steffens, Kathy Bosch Jan 2003

Nf152 Why Children Misbehave, Pat Steffens, Kathy Bosch

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide provides insight into why children misbehave and offers strategies parents can use to prevent misbehavior.

Understanding why children misbehave is important. We can respond more effectively to them and their behavior when we figure out what is causing the problem. Effective parents know and use strategies and techniques to prevent a child's misbehavior.


Nf03-573 Handling Used Oil A Guide For Small Businesses, Gabe Hodill, Janet R. Hygnstrom, Bruce I. Dvorak Jan 2003

Nf03-573 Handling Used Oil A Guide For Small Businesses, Gabe Hodill, Janet R. Hygnstrom, Bruce I. Dvorak

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact is about handling used oil for small businesses and gives references to used oil collection sites.


Ec03-219 2003 Nebraska Swine Report, Duane Reese Jan 2003

Ec03-219 2003 Nebraska Swine Report, Duane Reese

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The 2003 Nebraska Swine Report was prepared by the staff in Animal Science and cooperating Departments for use in Extension, Teaching and Research programs. This publications deals with research on swine reproduction, breeding, health, nutrition, economics, and housing.


G03-1523 Low Toxic Cockroach Control, Barbara P. Ogg, Clyde L. Ogg Jan 2003

G03-1523 Low Toxic Cockroach Control, Barbara P. Ogg, Clyde L. Ogg

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes how to identify common cockroach species, what they need to survive, and effective, low-toxic alternatives to traditional chemical control options.

Some people see a cockroach and immediately grab a can of bug spray, but a quick spray from an aerosol can won't provide long-term control. Ingredients in most aerosol and "bomb" treatments repel cockroaches. Using these products can cause the cockroaches to hide deeper inside walls and be more difficult to control later. To make the most of your efforts to control cockroaches, use a multiple tactic approach. First, you need to understand a little about ...