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Literacy

Faculty of Education and Arts Publications

Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Education

The 5 C'S Of Literacy And Literary Skills Development: Conversations, Community, Collaboration, Creativity And Connection, Michael Griffith, Diana Simmons, Wai-Leng Wong, Simon Smith Jan 2012

The 5 C'S Of Literacy And Literary Skills Development: Conversations, Community, Collaboration, Creativity And Connection, Michael Griffith, Diana Simmons, Wai-Leng Wong, Simon Smith

Faculty of Education and Arts Publications

The use of blogging has been explored on how it can enhance and extend support for student participation and learning: as collaborative learning spaces, for increased participation and interaction amongst students, as a valuable asset to the learning schedules of large cohort university teaching, for promoting writing skills. The limitations and lack of perceived benefits have also been acknowledged in some studies. At our university, blogging has been applied in a course to enhance the engagement of students in the study of literature, to extend community with peers, and to build skills for future employability. It is precisely because of ...


Resourcing Teachers To Tide The Semantic Wave To Whole School Literacy Development, Sally Humphrey, Sandra Robinson Jan 2012

Resourcing Teachers To Tide The Semantic Wave To Whole School Literacy Development, Sally Humphrey, Sandra Robinson

Faculty of Education and Arts Publications

In this paper we report on a whole school literacy research project, Embedding Literacies in the KLA's (ELK). The starting point for this endeavour is the theory of knowledge development conceptualised within the sociology of education as the semantic wave (Maton, forthcoming). As discipline knowledge typically resides in the "high stakes" texts students need to read and write, knowledge of the language resources used to create academic language is essential, as is a meta-language, which is accessible for use by teachers, students and parents but is sufficiently robust to make visible the resources of specialised academic discourses. To this ...


"I'M Making It Different To The Book": Transmediation In Young Children's Multimodal And Digital Texts [Accepted Manuscript], Kathy Mills Sep 2011

"I'M Making It Different To The Book": Transmediation In Young Children's Multimodal And Digital Texts [Accepted Manuscript], Kathy Mills

Faculty of Education and Arts Publications

Young children shift meanings across multiple modes long before they have mastered formal writing skills. In a digital age, children are socialised into a wide range of new digital media conventions in the home, at school, and in communitybased settings. This article draws on longitudinal classroom research with a culturally diverse cohort of eight-year-old children, to advance new understandings about children's engagement in transmediation in the context of digital media creation. The author illuminates three key principles of transmediation, using multimodalsnapshots of storyboard images, digital movie frames, and online comics. Insights about transmediation are developed through dialogue with the ...


Iped Pedagogy For Digital Text Production [Accepted Manuscript], Kathy Mills, Amanda Levido Sep 2011

Iped Pedagogy For Digital Text Production [Accepted Manuscript], Kathy Mills, Amanda Levido

Faculty of Education and Arts Publications

Reading and writing are being transformed by global changes in communication practices using new media technologies. iPed is a research-based pedagogy that enables teachers to navigate innovative digital text production in the literacy classroom


Shrek Meets Vygotsky: Rethinking Adolescents Multimodal Literacy Practices In Schools [Accepted Manuscript], Kathy Mills Jan 2010

Shrek Meets Vygotsky: Rethinking Adolescents Multimodal Literacy Practices In Schools [Accepted Manuscript], Kathy Mills

Faculty of Education and Arts Publications

Not all adolescents today are "digital natives." Greater emphasis should be placed on expert scaffolding of these literacies in school settings in order to extend students' repertoire of skills and genres.


Multiliteracies: Interrogating Competing Discourses [Accepted Manuscripts], Kathy Mills Jan 2009

Multiliteracies: Interrogating Competing Discourses [Accepted Manuscripts], Kathy Mills

Faculty of Education and Arts Publications

The term ‘multiliteracies’ was coined by the New London Group in 1996 to describe the emergence of new literacies and changing forms of meaning making in contemporary contexts of increased cultural and linguistic diversity. The proliferation of powerful, multimodal literacies means that previous conceptions of literacy as ‘writing and speech’ are collapsing. Educators and researchers worldwide are rethinking literacy pedagogy to enable students to participate fully in our dynamic, technological and culturally diverse societies. This paper interrogates competing discourses that have arisen in academic literature during the decade since multiliteracies originated. This scholarly debate is timely because multiliteracies are receiving ...


"We've Been Wastin' A Whole Million Watchin' Her Doin' Her Shoes" Situated Practice Within A Pedagogy Of Multiliteracies [Accepted Manuscript], Kathy Mills Dec 2006

"We've Been Wastin' A Whole Million Watchin' Her Doin' Her Shoes" Situated Practice Within A Pedagogy Of Multiliteracies [Accepted Manuscript], Kathy Mills

Faculty of Education and Arts Publications

Communication in society today is characterised by rapidly changing and emergent forms of meaning-making in a context of increased cultural and linguistic diversity. The need to teach these new literacy practices referred to as multiliteracies, is now embedded within systemic policies in Australia. This research paper is a response to these imperatives, releasing key findings of a critical ethnographic study concerning interactions between pedagogy and access to multiliteracies among culturally and linguistically diverse learners. A salient finding was that situated practice was enacted as an isolated stage rather than occurring concurrently with overt instruction. This had significant connections to some ...