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Full-Text Articles in Education

Beer And Brewing In German Culture: Bridging The Gaps Within Steam, John D. Sundquist Sep 2015

Beer And Brewing In German Culture: Bridging The Gaps Within Steam, John D. Sundquist

The STEAM Journal

A university-level course on science, history, and culture of beer and brewing offers students from a wide range of disciplines a unique opportunity to learn from each other. They gain an appreciation for STEAM and the interaction of a number of disciplines while examining a subject of growing interest. This paper provides a brief description of such a course and includes specific examples of ways in which students explore science, engineering, humanities and the arts, as these areas of research come together in the study of beer and brewing.


Syllabus: Introduction To Permaculture, Lisa Depiano Jan 2015

Syllabus: Introduction To Permaculture, Lisa Depiano

Sustainability Education Resources

The Permaculture Design Course is a three-credit course that offers students a foundation in permaculture history, ethics, principles, design process, and practical applications. The framework behind the theory and practice of permaculture is rooted in the observation of natural systems. By observing key ecological relationships, we can mimic and apply these beneficial relationships in the design of systems that serve humans while helping to restore the natural world. This course trains students as critical thinkers, observers, and analysts of the world(s) around them, and then goes on to provide students with the tools needed to design for inspired and ...


Under The Asabe Umbrella — Engineering Degree Programs Need Curriculum Reform, D. Raj Raman, Amy L. Kaleita Jan 2014

Under The Asabe Umbrella — Engineering Degree Programs Need Curriculum Reform, D. Raj Raman, Amy L. Kaleita

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Publications

The first-ever issue of Transactions of the ASAE, published in 1907, opens with a talk given by Howard W. Riley (after whom Riley-Robb Hall at Cornell University would later be named) that's modestly titled "The Courses in Agricultural Engineering that Should be Offered." Responses from several other luminaries, including J. B. Davidson (after whom Davidson Hall at Iowa State University would later be named), are included and make for fascinating reading for any student or practitioner of our discipline.


Changing Maine, 1960-2010: Teaching Guide, Richard Barringer, New England Environmental Finance Center Jul 2006

Changing Maine, 1960-2010: Teaching Guide, Richard Barringer, New England Environmental Finance Center

Maine History & Policy Development

Unlike forty years ago, none of us is now certain what the future holds for Maine – except that it will be different. Maine has been transformed by the events of the recent decades. We have come into a new world, a new time – a new historical era, if you will. This new era, like previous eras in Maine history, will require of us new ways of thinking, new ways of understanding, new ways of organizing ourselves as a community of people, if the values and culture we share and cherish are to endure and flourish.


Ec02-172 Plumeless Thistle, Kara L. Hilgenfeld, Alex Martin Jan 2002

Ec02-172 Plumeless Thistle, Kara L. Hilgenfeld, Alex Martin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Plumeless thistle (Carduus acanthoides L.) is one of seven noxious weeds in Nebraska. An introduced invasive broadleaf weed native to Europe and Asia, plumeless thistle currently infests about 65,000 acres in Nebraska. Infestations of plumeless thistle may reduce productivity of pastures and rangeland, where infestations tend to be the largest. Plumeless thistle competes with and suppresses growth of desirable species. Heavy infestations prevent livestock from grazing the area and lighter infestations prevent livestock from eating plants growing near the thistle. Estimates place the annual loss in Nebraska agricultural production due to plumeless thistle at $162,000. Although plumeless thistle ...


Ec02-171 Canada Thistle, Robert G. Wilson Jan 2002

Ec02-171 Canada Thistle, Robert G. Wilson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Canada thistle [Cirsium arvense (L) Scop.] is one of the seven species defined by Nebraska law as a noxious weed. At least 35 other states also have determined by law that Canada thistle poses a threat to the economic, social, and aesthetic well-being of the residents of their state. Canada thistle is probably the most widespread of all the thistle species and many land managers consider it the most difficult thistle to control. In Nebraska, Canada thistle is estimated to infest 460,000 acres.


Ec02-177 Purple Loosestrife, Stevan Z. Knezevic Jan 2002

Ec02-177 Purple Loosestrife, Stevan Z. Knezevic

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) is an introduced invasive weed that isover running thousands of acres of wetlands and waterways in the Midwest. Once purple loosestrife invades a wetland, natural habitat is lost and the productivity of native plant and animal communities is severely reduced. These losses in turn interfere with various levels of the ecosystem and area recreational activities such as fishing, boating and hunting, diminishing revenue from tourism and impairing the social and economic well being of local communities. A single control measure cannot provide long-term, sustainable control of this weed. An integrated approach, using a variety of mechanical ...


Ec02-174 Leafy Spurge, Robert A. Masters, Brady F. Kappler Jan 2002

Ec02-174 Leafy Spurge, Robert A. Masters, Brady F. Kappler

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Leafy spurge is an invasive weed that infests over three million acres in the northern Great Plains and the prairie provinces of Canada. It is commonly found in rangelands, pastures, roadsides, rights-of-way, and woodlands. Leafy spurge can reduce rangeland and pasture carrying capacity by as much as 75 percent because it competes with forages and cattle avoid grazing areas infested with this weed. In North Dakota where leafy spurge infests about 900,000 acres, estimates of direct and indirect losses exceed $100 million each year. In Nebraska, the direct loss in forage value attributed to leafy spurge has been estimated ...


Cc02-425 Achieving Success With A Business Plan, Ram Valluru, Allen Prosch, H. Douglas Jose Jan 2002

Cc02-425 Achieving Success With A Business Plan, Ram Valluru, Allen Prosch, H. Douglas Jose

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The publication, Achieving Success With a Business Plan includes instructions and wookbook to prepare a farm business plan. The areas covered in this publication include: business organization; history and overview of operation; mission statement; goals; priorities, purpose and strategic outlook; situation statements; legal and contractual situation; production situation; financial situation; marketing situation; personnel situation; and Risk Management Plan.


Ec02-173 Spotted And Diffuse Knapweed, Neil L. Heckman, Ryan M. Goss, Roch E. Gaussoin, Stevan Z. Knezevic, John L. Lindquist Jan 2002

Ec02-173 Spotted And Diffuse Knapweed, Neil L. Heckman, Ryan M. Goss, Roch E. Gaussoin, Stevan Z. Knezevic, John L. Lindquist

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Spotted knapweed (Centaure amaculosa Lam. = C. biebersteinii DC.) and diffuse knapweed (C.diffusa Lam.) are two of Nebraska’s seven noxious weeds. They are also noxious in at least 17 other states. These are closely related species that are well adapted to a variety of habitats including open forests, rangelands and pastures, Conservation Reserve Program lands, roadsides, and ditch banks. Centaurea is a large genus of over 400 species, 32 of which are common weeds of the United States and several of which [e.g., yellowstar thistle, C. solstitalis L, and Russian knapweed, C. repens L. =Acroptilon repens (L.) DC ...


Ec02-176 Musk Thistle, Fred Roeth, Steven R. Melvin, Irvin L. Schleufer Jan 2002

Ec02-176 Musk Thistle, Fred Roeth, Steven R. Melvin, Irvin L. Schleufer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Musk thistle (Carduus nutans L.) is an introduced invasive broadleaf weed native to Europe, North Africa, and Asia. In these areas it is a minor weed because natural enemies keep its population low. When the plant was introduced into North America, its natural enemies were left behind. Without these natural checks, the thistle is able to thrive and compete with native vegetation.

Musk thistles aggressively invade all lands in Nebraska. Typical cropland weed control methods are very effective against them; however, land with permanent cover (pasture, range, roadway ditches and wasteland) that is not tilled or treated with a herbicide ...


Cc02-428 Achieving Success With A Business Plan: Case Study Of A Diversified Farm Business Plan, Jody Wichmann, Thomas Dorn, H. Douglas Jose Jan 2002

Cc02-428 Achieving Success With A Business Plan: Case Study Of A Diversified Farm Business Plan, Jody Wichmann, Thomas Dorn, H. Douglas Jose

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication is a case study of a diversified farm business plan. It covers the business organization; history and overview of operation; operation layout; mission statement and goals; strategic outlook; present business, legal and contractual situation; production, financial marketing, and personnel situations; job description, salary, benefits and labor training; and personnel summary.


Cc02-426 Achieving Success With A Business Plan: Case Study Of A Cow/Calf Business Plan, Jody Wichmann, John Hanson, H. Douglas Jose Jan 2002

Cc02-426 Achieving Success With A Business Plan: Case Study Of A Cow/Calf Business Plan, Jody Wichmann, John Hanson, H. Douglas Jose

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication is a case study of a cow/calf business plan. It covers the business organization; history and overview of the operation; the operation layout; mission statement and goals; present business, legal and contractual situations; production, financial, marketing and personnel situations; job description, salary, benefits and labor training; and personnel summary.


G02-1464 West Nile Virus - Getting Prepared, Grasso M. Ebako, Sheila Scheideler, Wayne Kramer, Ron J. Johnson, David R. Smith, Del Wilmot, David J. Steffen Jan 2002

G02-1464 West Nile Virus - Getting Prepared, Grasso M. Ebako, Sheila Scheideler, Wayne Kramer, Ron J. Johnson, David R. Smith, Del Wilmot, David J. Steffen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide provides background information and answers to commonly asked questions about this disease. West Nile Virus is spread by mosquitoes and affects birds (mostly Corvidae such as crows, blue jays and magpies), horses, and people. As West Nile Virus appears in neighboring states, the threat of diagnosing a case in Nebraska becomes more likely.


Ec99-107 Nebraska Proso, Sunflower, Bean, Pea, Oat And Spring Wheat Variety Tests, 1999, David D. Baltensperger, Glen E. Frickel, Robert N. Klein, James Krall, Randy Anderson, James Hain, Clair Stymiest, Jerry Nachtman, Lenis Alton Nelson, P. Stephen Baenziger Jan 1999

Ec99-107 Nebraska Proso, Sunflower, Bean, Pea, Oat And Spring Wheat Variety Tests, 1999, David D. Baltensperger, Glen E. Frickel, Robert N. Klein, James Krall, Randy Anderson, James Hain, Clair Stymiest, Jerry Nachtman, Lenis Alton Nelson, P. Stephen Baenziger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of spring small grain trials grown throughout Nebraska, and proso, sunflower, dry bean, and field pea variety trials conducted by the Panhandle Research and Extension Center, Scottsbluff, and the High Plains Agricultural Laboratory, Sidney. Conduct of the experiments and publication of results is a joint effort of the Agricultural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Service.


The Home Fronts Of Iowa, 1940-1945 , Lisa Lynn Ossian Jan 1998

The Home Fronts Of Iowa, 1940-1945 , Lisa Lynn Ossian

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

Iowa's citizens during World War II became soldiers in their loyalty, energy, and commitment as they fought on one or more of the home fronts. These four home fronts (historic terms) were the farm, production, community, and kitchen fronts. The farm front as part of the Food for Freedom campaign produced corn, soybeans, eggs, pork, beef, milk, and hemp for the Armed Services and the Allies. Iowa's farmers faced labor and machinery shortages yet produced record amounts of crops and animals. This prosperity, however, cost Iowa some of its valuable topsoil and initiated a turn toward a factory ...


Ec98-107 Nebraska Proso, Sunflower, Bean, Pea, Oat And Spring Wheat Variety Tests, 1998, David D. Baltensperger, Glen E. Frickel, Robert N. Klein, James Krall, Randy Anderson, James Hain, Clair Stymiest, Jerry Nachtman, Jane Sooby, Lenis Alton Nelson, P. Stephen Baenziger, Kyung-Moon Kim Jan 1998

Ec98-107 Nebraska Proso, Sunflower, Bean, Pea, Oat And Spring Wheat Variety Tests, 1998, David D. Baltensperger, Glen E. Frickel, Robert N. Klein, James Krall, Randy Anderson, James Hain, Clair Stymiest, Jerry Nachtman, Jane Sooby, Lenis Alton Nelson, P. Stephen Baenziger, Kyung-Moon Kim

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of spring small grain trials grown throughout Nebraska, and proso, sunflower, dry bean, and field pea variety trials conducted by the Panhandle Research and Extension Center, Scottsbluff, and the High Plains Agricultural Laboratory, Sidney. Conduct of the experiments and publication of results is a joint effort of the Agricultural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Service.


Ec98-148 Grassland Management With Prescribed Fire, John Ortmann, Daniel D. Beran, Robert A. Masters, James L. Stubbendieck Jan 1998

Ec98-148 Grassland Management With Prescribed Fire, John Ortmann, Daniel D. Beran, Robert A. Masters, James L. Stubbendieck

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular provides an overview of the use of fire in grassland management. It describes the history and importance of fire in the grassland ecosystem, how plants respond to fire, and the uses and potential benefits of prescribed fire. It also summarizes fire planning, and legal and safety considerations. And finally, it provides guidance on some special uses of fire.


G98-1359 Western Bean Cutworm In Corn And Dry Beans (Revised April 2004), Ronald C. Seymour, Gary L. Hein, Robert J. Wright, John B. Campbell Jan 1998

G98-1359 Western Bean Cutworm In Corn And Dry Beans (Revised April 2004), Ronald C. Seymour, Gary L. Hein, Robert J. Wright, John B. Campbell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Western bean cutworm (WBC) can be a severe pest in corn and dry beans. Larval feeding damages both crops through reduced yield and quality. In corn, direct feeding losses may be compounded by fungal and mold infections associated with larval waste products. In beans, damaged or 'worm-chewed' beans are a significant quality factor for both processed and dry bagged beans. Western bean cutworm infestations occur every year in western Nebraska. In some years, this pest is found in high numbers throughout the state.

This NebGuide addresses the life cycle, scouting and treatment of the western bean cutworm in corn and ...


Ec97-101 Nebraska Soybean Variety Tests, 1997, Lenis Alton Nelson, Roger Wesley Elmore, Robert N. Klein, Charles A. Shapiro Jan 1997

Ec97-101 Nebraska Soybean Variety Tests, 1997, Lenis Alton Nelson, Roger Wesley Elmore, Robert N. Klein, Charles A. Shapiro

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of soybean variety trials conducted by personnel of the Agronomy Department and the Northeast, South Central and West Central Research and Extension Centers. Conduct of experiments and publication of results is a joint effort of the Agricultural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Service.


G94-1204 Face Fly Control Guide, John B. Campbell Jan 1994

G94-1204 Face Fly Control Guide, John B. Campbell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The face fly congregates about the eyes and nose of animals, causing annoyance and possible disease transmission. This NebGuide discusses face fly breeding and effective controls.

The face fly closely resembles the house fly except it is slightly larger and darker. Other differentiating characteristics include: 1) the abdomen of the male face fly is orange and the female has an orange stripe; the abdomen of the house fly is white or light grey and 2) the compound eyes of male face flies nearly touch but are separated in the house flies.

The persistence and habit of congregating about the eyes ...


G93-1145 Management Of The Army Cutworm And Pale Western Cutworm, Gary L. Hein, John B. Campbell, Stephen D. Danielson, James A. Kalisch Jan 1993

G93-1145 Management Of The Army Cutworm And Pale Western Cutworm, Gary L. Hein, John B. Campbell, Stephen D. Danielson, James A. Kalisch

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes the life cycle of the army cutworm and pale western cutworm, and provides recommendations for management.

The army cutworm, Euxoa auxiliaris, and the pale western cutworm, Agrotis orthogonia, are sporadic pests that are distributed throughout the Great Plains. The army cutworm can be found throughout Nebraska, but is more common in the western half of the state. Because of the drier environment, the pale western cutworm is found only in the western third of Nebraska. Both cutworms can feed on a vast array of crops and weeds. Their major economic impact is limited to winter wheat and ...


G84-734 State Income Taxes In Nebraska (Revised March 1992), A.L. (Roy) Frederick Jan 1984

G84-734 State Income Taxes In Nebraska (Revised March 1992), A.L. (Roy) Frederick

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This is one of a series of NebGuides on financing state and local government. This publication describes how income taxes support state government functions.

State government in Nebraska has levied a tax on income since 1968. This tax applies to income earned by individuals, fiduciaries (trusts and estates) and corporations.

Prior to 1987, Nebraska's income tax for individuals and fiduciaries was based on a percentage of federal income tax liability.


G84-732 Property Taxes In Nebraska (Revised September 1992), A.L. (Roy) Frederick Jan 1984

G84-732 Property Taxes In Nebraska (Revised September 1992), A.L. (Roy) Frederick

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This is one of a series of NebGuides on financing state and local government. This publication describes how property taxes support local government functions.

The property tax is the primary source of revenue for more than 3,000 units of local government in Nebraska, including school districts, counties and municipalities. In 1991, statewide property tax levies totalled $1.257 billion, a sum that approximated the combined revenues from state income and sales taxes.


G84-733 General Sales And Use Taxes In Nebraska (Revised March 1992), A.L.(Roy) Frederick Jan 1984

G84-733 General Sales And Use Taxes In Nebraska (Revised March 1992), A.L.(Roy) Frederick

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This is one of a series of NebGuides on financing state and local government. This publication describes how sales taxes support state and municipal government functions.

A sales or use tax is a tax on consumption. It is paid by adding it to the price of purchased products.

Sales and use taxes in Nebraska (and most other states) have several dimensions.


G82-623 An Overview Of Concrete As A Building Material, David P. Shelton, James M. Harper Jan 1982

G82-623 An Overview Of Concrete As A Building Material, David P. Shelton, James M. Harper

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The general properties of concrete are discussed, as well as its components and their proportions. Includes decisions customers should consider before using concrete.

Concrete, specifically portland cement concrete, has the qualities of strength, durability, versatility, and economy, and can be placed or molded into virtually any shape and reproduce any surface texture. It is the most widely used construction material in the world. In the United States almost twice as much portland cement concrete is used as all other construction materials combined.