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Full-Text Articles in Education

Creating Serious Games At Third Level: Evaluating The Implications Of An In-House Approach, Pauline Rooney Oct 2012

Creating Serious Games At Third Level: Evaluating The Implications Of An In-House Approach, Pauline Rooney

Conference papers

Due to the inherently interdisciplinary nature of serious games their development
necessitates the effective collaboration of team members spanning multiple disciplines and skill sets (Adams 2010). In their attempts to harness these skills, most higher education projects have formed teams through academic/commercial partnerships, whereby academics and commercial developers combine their respective expertises in subject matter/pedagogy and game design/development. However considering the expertise in most higher education institutions and the recent surge in serious games courses at third level, one might reasonably conclude that higher education holds huge potential for developing serious games in-house. Yet surprisingly, such ventures ...


Framework For Formative Assessment Learning Strategies In Built Environment Higher Education Programmes, Lloyd Scott, Christopher Fortune Sep 2012

Framework For Formative Assessment Learning Strategies In Built Environment Higher Education Programmes, Lloyd Scott, Christopher Fortune

Conference papers

Formative assessment has begun to be recognized as a driving force for enhancing student learning. This paper addresses the context of Built Environment (BE) undergraduate programmes and the findings from a research project in the context of the changing Higher Education (HE) environment. The analysis of the literature on formative assessment shows that there is a common concern among the educational researchers about the function and position of assessment in HE today. The overall aim of this research is to contribute to an improvement in the quality of student learning in BE undergraduate education through the development of a theoretical ...


Considering The Shift In Lecturer Roles As Key Skills And Competencies Are Fostered In Higher Education Students Today, Frances Boylan, Muireann Okeeffe, Mary O'Rawe Dec 2011

Considering The Shift In Lecturer Roles As Key Skills And Competencies Are Fostered In Higher Education Students Today, Frances Boylan, Muireann Okeeffe, Mary O'Rawe

Conference papers

The need to develop the skills in students for smooth progression from higher education into employment are even more important in today’s economic climate. Students need to be increasingly adaptable and entrepreneurial in their ability to locate and create employment opportunities. Consequently, efforts are afoot throughout the higher education sector to develop measures to ‘broaden the curriculum’ addressing the holistic development of the student. In an attempt to prepare these students to manage their work and learning throughout all stages of their lives, lecturers now recognise the importance of fostering key skills and competencies. However, supporting and implementing these ...


Student Perspectives On How Higher Education In Ireland Can Help Meet The Needs Of The Irish Economy, Ann Conway, Noelle O'Connor Mar 2011

Student Perspectives On How Higher Education In Ireland Can Help Meet The Needs Of The Irish Economy, Ann Conway, Noelle O'Connor

Conference papers

This paper will be in three parts; the first section will examine the current tertiary education situation in Ireland amid the global economic crisis and will review what higher education’s contribution be to help alleviate the crisis. Building stronger links with the academy and the economy to help raise skills,
efficiency and productivity is becoming more important in ensuring global competitiveness and retaining equality and accessibility in the academy (see Gaffikin and Morrissey, 2003: 98 [14]). The second section will look at the merge of entrepreneurship and education. As the lifelong learning society is conceptualised largely in terms of ...


Ireland And The Bologna Process: Recognition Issues For Higher Education Institutions, Frank Mcmahon Nov 2010

Ireland And The Bologna Process: Recognition Issues For Higher Education Institutions, Frank Mcmahon

Conference papers

This paper looks at the implementation of the Bologna Process in Ireland in the period 1999 to 2010 and the challenges faced by Ireland in the continued implementation in the next decade.


Where Next?: Mapping And Understanding The Post First Degree Destinations Of Mature Disadvantaged Students In Three Higher Education Institutions, Aidan Kenny, Andrew Loxley, Ted Fleming, Fergal Finnegan Sep 2009

Where Next?: Mapping And Understanding The Post First Degree Destinations Of Mature Disadvantaged Students In Three Higher Education Institutions, Aidan Kenny, Andrew Loxley, Ted Fleming, Fergal Finnegan

Conference papers

Executive summary (draft for An Pobal conference 24/Sept/09,). The study explored the post first-degree destinations (employment, postgraduate education or otherwise) of students designated as being ‘mature disadvantaged’ in three Irish higher education institutions: NUI Maynooth, Trinity College Dublin and Dublin Institute of Technology. This research attempts to fill a noticeable gap in the ‘access story’ which firmly supports the entry of mature disadvantaged students to HE and has devised a range creative, innovative and targeted measures to enable matures students to stay the course but has rarely looked at how these students view HE or what happens after ...


Analysis Of The Transformative Potential Of Blended Problem-Based Learning In Higher Education Faculty Development, Roisin Donnelly Jan 2008

Analysis Of The Transformative Potential Of Blended Problem-Based Learning In Higher Education Faculty Development, Roisin Donnelly

Conference papers

A hugely important area in any form of PBL delivery is the role of the instructor; in a blended learning environment, it is even more crucial. Hughes and Daykin (2002) have suggested that a move to online delivery needs a greater attention to design and development of facilitator skills than has been previously recognised. A blended module for faculty, delivered using a problem-based learning approach, is the setting for continuing research into the transformative role that an instructor can play during the learning process. Coppola, Hiltz and Rotter (2001) identify a number of roles played by instructors in e-learning, but ...


Blended Learning In Higher Education: Theory And Praxis, G. Reinmann, J. Macdonald, Roisin Donnelly, J. Fransen, E. Poldner Jan 2007

Blended Learning In Higher Education: Theory And Praxis, G. Reinmann, J. Macdonald, Roisin Donnelly, J. Fransen, E. Poldner

Conference papers

Recent studies are showing that ‘blended learning’ is more than a mix between face-to-face and online education, or in other words: a mix of traditional and computer-based education. Blended learning seems to include mixtures between eLearning and other ways of learning, where the right choices have to be made in the distribution of learning content, didactical approaches, ways of communicating and characteristics of learning environments, in the perspective of the type of learning process and characteristics of students. This symposium provides evidence from qualitative studies of blended learning in practical situations, drawing on tutors’ and students’ perspectives, contrasted with theoretical ...


The Bologna Process And The Recognition Of Qualifications, Frank Mcmahon Jan 2003

The Bologna Process And The Recognition Of Qualifications, Frank Mcmahon

Conference papers

No abstract provided.


Teaching Postgraduate Research Methods Using A Novel Problem-Based Learning Approach, Roisin Donnelly Jan 2002

Teaching Postgraduate Research Methods Using A Novel Problem-Based Learning Approach, Roisin Donnelly

Conference papers

This session describes both the reasons for and the process of designing and delivering a Research Methods Module using a Problem-based Learning (PBL) approach in a Postgraduate Diploma in Third Level Learning and Teaching at a higher education institute in Ireland. The students who undertake this part-time Module are cohorts of academic staff (Faculty Members) in Higher Education (HE). They are hitherto referred to as participants. This module is one of eight offered on the PG Diploma, all designed and delivered using Problem-based Learning. The entire PG Diploma is voluntary, and only Faculty who are keen to implement novel pedagogical ...


Combining An Online And Problem-Based Approach: With Learning As The Common Denominator, Roisin Donnelly Jan 2001

Combining An Online And Problem-Based Approach: With Learning As The Common Denominator, Roisin Donnelly

Conference papers

This paper describes the design and delivery of a specialised Online Learning (OL) module in a Postgraduate Diploma in Third Level Learning and Teaching for academic staff at a higher education institute in Ireland. It is designed and delivered online with the WebCT Online Learning Environment using a Problem-based Learning (PBL) approach, with an emphasis on group learning in a real life multi-disciplinary learning environment for the module participants. The aim of the OL/PBL module is to enable the academic staff participants to become aware of the practicalities of developing, co-ordinating, supporting and evaluating an online course in their ...


The Virtual University: Lessons From A Virtual Cross-Cultural Learning Situation In International Management, Mikael Søndergaard, Jeanette Lemmergaard, Paul Donnelly, Marta B. Cálas Sep 1999

The Virtual University: Lessons From A Virtual Cross-Cultural Learning Situation In International Management, Mikael Søndergaard, Jeanette Lemmergaard, Paul Donnelly, Marta B. Cálas

Conference papers

This paper addresses some issues regarding virtual learning and the future of traditional universities. Specifically, it considers these issues by reflecting on the following: First, it focuses on the repercussions of information technologies for teaching and learning in "cross-cultural" courses. It critically assesses, via three recent examples, how these approaches influence teaching and learning in the context of international management courses. Second, drawing from the above examples, the paper reflects more broadly on the implications of these technologies: (1) for new forms of knowing and knowledge production; and (2) for the future of institutional conditions of universities.