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Agriculture

1996

Articles 1 - 10 of 10

Full-Text Articles in Education

G96-1293 Feedlot Abandonment Recommended Procedures, Richard K. Koelsch, Gerald R. Bodman Jan 1996

G96-1293 Feedlot Abandonment Recommended Procedures, Richard K. Koelsch, Gerald R. Bodman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

An abandoned animal feeding facility is a significant threat to the environment. Procedures to minimize the risk are discussed.

Feedlot abandonment occurs for various reasons, including economic and social changes, environmental concerns, consolidation for more cost effective management and operation, and modification of personal goals. Whether a feedlot is abandoned for a short time until some crisis passes, or permanently, steps are necessary to minimize the risk of environmental degradation.

Under both scenarios, an abandoned feedlot poses an immediate threat to surface and groundwater quality. The unused facility is also a potential nuisance and source of health problems for humans ...


Nf96-310 Costs Of Harvesting And Hauling Corn Stalks In Large Round Bales, H. Douglas Jose, Lance L. Brown Jan 1996

Nf96-310 Costs Of Harvesting And Hauling Corn Stalks In Large Round Bales, H. Douglas Jose, Lance L. Brown

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact calculates the costs of harvesting corn stalks for either livestock fodder or industrial uses.


G96-1305 Water Runoff From Sprinkler Irrigation: A Case Study, Norman L. Klocke, William L. Kranz, C. Dean Yonts, Kelly Wertz Jan 1996

G96-1305 Water Runoff From Sprinkler Irrigation: A Case Study, Norman L. Klocke, William L. Kranz, C. Dean Yonts, Kelly Wertz

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide illustrates the influence of soil texture, topography and irrigation system characteristics on potential runoff.

When water is applied to a field through a sprinkler irrigation system, it should soak into the soil where it lands rather than drain to a low spot or off the field altogether. Runoff causes non-uniformity of water application, poor irrigation efficiency and possible leaching of chemicals to the groundwater. Some systems like LEPA (Low Energy Precision Application) are designed so water does not immediately soak into the soil. However, proper LEPA designs also call for tillage practices that hold the water on the ...


Ec96-1768 Windbreak Management, James R. Brandle, Craig Stange Jan 1996

Ec96-1768 Windbreak Management, James R. Brandle, Craig Stange

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The windbreaks on your farm are an important part of the agricultural landscape. They provide protection for the farmstead, livestock, and crops; provide habitat for wildlife; and contribute to an overall healthy environment for you and your family. They are living systems with youth, maturity, and old age. Like any other living thing they need proper care and management in order to continue to function at their best.

Windbreak management requires an understanding of how your windbreak works. Your goal is to maintain the health and vigor of individual trees and shrubs while maintaining the overall structure of the windbreak ...


Ec96-1770 Windbreaks For Snow Management, James R. Brandle, H. Doak Nickerson Jan 1996

Ec96-1770 Windbreaks For Snow Management, James R. Brandle, H. Doak Nickerson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

In areas of high winds and blowing snow, windbreaks can reduce the amount of effort spent on snow management. They can be designed to spread snow across a large area or to confine it to a relatively small storage area. The design of your windbreak will depend on your objective. Field windbreaks designed to distribute snow evenly across a field should be tall and porous. In contrast, windbreaks designed to capture snow and control drifting should have multiple rows with high density. There is no one set design, number of rows, or width of planting that is ideal for every ...


G96-1311 Global Warming: What Is Known And Why Nebraska Agriculture Should Care, William E. Easterling, Cynthia Hayes Jan 1996

G96-1311 Global Warming: What Is Known And Why Nebraska Agriculture Should Care, William E. Easterling, Cynthia Hayes

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The purpose of this NebGuide is to review the facts of global warming, to point out what is sheer speculation, and to suggest why Nebraska agriculture should care about global warming.

Climatologists talk about global warming one year and the next year they talk about global cooling! Depending on the time periods involved, both views may be correct. Over the next few hundred years, the earth may undergo a general cooling trend. This trend is consistent with the regular shifts into and out of ice age conditions that have characterized the earth's climate history of the last 50,000 ...


Nf96-305 Precision Farming In Nebraska: A Status Report, William Miller, Ray Supalla Jan 1996

Nf96-305 Precision Farming In Nebraska: A Status Report, William Miller, Ray Supalla

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Precision farming is a term applied to a broad array of topics that relate to the precise management of small units of land in contrast to the more traditional management of an entire field in a uniform manner.


Nf96-307 Managing The Russian Wheat Aphid With Resistant Wheat Varieties, John Thomas, Gary Hein, David Baltensperger, Lenis Alton Nelson, Scott Haley Jan 1996

Nf96-307 Managing The Russian Wheat Aphid With Resistant Wheat Varieties, John Thomas, Gary Hein, David Baltensperger, Lenis Alton Nelson, Scott Haley

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact has information on using resistant wheat varieties to control Russian wheat aphids.


Ec96-143 Pesticide Runoff And Water Quality In Nebraska, Steven Comfort, Thomas G. Franti, S.K. Smith Jan 1996

Ec96-143 Pesticide Runoff And Water Quality In Nebraska, Steven Comfort, Thomas G. Franti, S.K. Smith

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Nebraska's natural resources provide its residents with an abundance of wildlife, recreation, and agricultural opportunities. Some of the state's most important resources are its lakes, rivers and streams. These surface waters provide year-round habitat for aquatic and terrestrial wildlife, rest stops for migratory birds, and countless hours of enjoyment for outdoor enthusiasts. In addition, surface waters provide a source of drinking water for many Nebraska residents, and are vital for some farming and industrial operations. To better understand how surface waters become contaminated from pesticide runoff, the various factors and processes influencing runoff must be understood. With this ...


Ec96-142 Crp Land Use Guide (Conservation Reserve Program), Douglas Anderson Jan 1996

Ec96-142 Crp Land Use Guide (Conservation Reserve Program), Douglas Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) contracts held by Nebraska producers will begin to expire in 1996. Thousands of acres of grassland will be eligible for haying, grazing or to be returned to other uses. Land-use decisions made by owners and operators will impact the economic viability and long-term productivity of individual farms, as well as the region as a whole.

The intent of the CRP Land Use Guide is not to provide all the asnwers - in many instances we don't even know the questions. It is however, intended to provide an outline of the key issues you will face when ...