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Agriculture

1989

Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Education

G89-932 Minimum Center Pivot Design Capacities In Nebraska, William L. Kranz, Derrel L. Martin, Greg Lackas Jan 1989

G89-932 Minimum Center Pivot Design Capacities In Nebraska, William L. Kranz, Derrel L. Martin, Greg Lackas

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Factors to consider in choosing an appropriate center pivot design are covered here. Irrigators investing in a center pivot irrigation system need to consider this important question: How much supplemental water is required by the crop? Irrigation system capacity needed to meet crop requirements is defined in units of gallons per minute (GPM) or gallons per minute per acre (GPM/AC). If the system capacity is too low, crop stress occurs during some portion of the growing season. If the capacity is too high, surface runoff may result, or capital investment for the pumping plant and center pivot may be ...


G89-937 The Pesticide Label, Larry D. Schulze, Shripat T. Kamble Jan 1989

G89-937 The Pesticide Label, Larry D. Schulze, Shripat T. Kamble

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes the parts of a pesticide label to aid understanding and promote safe and effective use of pesticide products.

Pesticide information can be provided to end users through labels and labeling. Not all pesticide products have labeling. While the words are similar, they have distinctly different meanings.


G89-900 Phytophthora Root Rot Of Alfalfa, John E. Watkins, Fred A. Gray, Bruce Anderson Jan 1989

G89-900 Phytophthora Root Rot Of Alfalfa, John E. Watkins, Fred A. Gray, Bruce Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Disease cycle, symptoms and management practices for phytophthora root rot are discussed in this NebGuide.

Phytophthora root rot (PRR) is a major cause of seedling death in newly established alfalfa, and causes a progressive decline of established stands in Nebraska. This disease is caused by the fungus Phytophthora megasperma f. sp. medicaginis and occurs in most of the alfalfa producing areas in North America.

The Phytophthora that infects alfalfa is different from the Phytophthora that causes root rot in soybeans. Growers sometimes think the two diseases are the same for the respective crops, but they are two different diseases with ...


G89-931 Alfalfa Anthracnose, John E. Watkins, Bruce Anderson Jan 1989

G89-931 Alfalfa Anthracnose, John E. Watkins, Bruce Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Symptoms, disease cycle and control of alfalfa anthracnose are discussed here.

Forage crops are grown on and harvested from more acres in Nebraska than any other crop. Of the almost 49 million acres of agricultural land in Nebraska, approximately 24 million acres are in hay. Alfalfa production has stabilized at about two million acres.

High feed and forage production costs and periodic droughts have generated increased concern by farmers and ranchers over forage losses from diseases, insects and environmental stresses. Estimates suggest about one-fourth of the U.S. alfalfa hay crop and one-tenth of the seed crop are lost annually ...


G89-912 Alfalfa Crown And Root Rots And Stand Longevity, John E. Watkins, Fred A. Gray, Bruce Anderson Jan 1989

G89-912 Alfalfa Crown And Root Rots And Stand Longevity, John E. Watkins, Fred A. Gray, Bruce Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Causes of crown and upper root rot, symptoms and management are discussed here.

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is the most important forage crop species in North America. It is widely adapted, energy efficient, and produces the most protein yield per acre. Alfalfa is well-suited to both dryland and irrigationd soils of Nebraska.

Many factors contribute to the decline in productivity of an alfalfa stand. Under favorable growing conditions and proper management, alfalfa stands in Nebraska can last over 10 years.


G89-901 Understand Your Soil Test: Sulfur, K.D. Frank, Delno Knudsen Jan 1989

G89-901 Understand Your Soil Test: Sulfur, K.D. Frank, Delno Knudsen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Factors leading to sulfur deficiency, soil and water tests, soil test interpretation and fertilizer materials that contain sulfur are covered here.

Sulfur, one of the macro-nutrients, may be deficient in some sandy soils but usually is plentiful in other soils of the state. The amounts contained by healthy crops are on the same order as phosphorus, ranging from 0.2 percent to .5 percent sulfur. It is a component of certain amino acids, and so is part of several proteins essential for plants and animals.


G88-892 Mixing Quality Pig Feed (Revised July 1992), Duane Reese, Mike Brumm Jan 1989

G88-892 Mixing Quality Pig Feed (Revised July 1992), Duane Reese, Mike Brumm

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Pig feed quality problems and mixing recommendations are covered here. Feed ingredients represent over 60 percent of the total cost of farrow-finish pork production and 65-70 percent of the variable expenses. Attention to quality preparation, in addition to purchasing decisions, is a component of feed ingredient cost management. Errors in formulation, misuse of feed mixing equipment, use of poor quality feed ingredients or lack of a quality assurance program can have costly consequences.