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Agriculture

1986

Articles 1 - 10 of 10

Full-Text Articles in Education

G86-795 Antibiotic Use In Animals, Duane N. Rice, E. Denis Erickson Jan 1986

G86-795 Antibiotic Use In Animals, Duane N. Rice, E. Denis Erickson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide provides general guidelines about some of the problems that can occur when using antibiotics in treating animals.

Antibiotics are frequently used, and misused, by animal owners in an attempt to remedy disease problems. This use is encouraged by drug company sales efforts, economic pressures, and easy access to the products.

Improper use of antibiotics is costly, detrimental, and may result in: 1) delayed diagnosis; 2) ineffectiveness; 3) toxicity (poisoning); 4) allergic reactions; and 5) drug residue contamination of food animal products.

After evaluating possible benefits and risks, determining whether or not to use antibiotics for treatment depends on ...


G86-797 Causes Of Vaccination-Immunization Failures In Livestock, Duane Rice, E. Denis Erickson, Dale Grotelueschen Jan 1986

G86-797 Causes Of Vaccination-Immunization Failures In Livestock, Duane Rice, E. Denis Erickson, Dale Grotelueschen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses reasons why vaccinations fail to provide immunity against disease, and how to prevent this from happening.

To comprehend the many reasons for vaccine failure, it is important to understand how animals and humans have the ability to resist infectious diseases. It is also important to know what a disease is and how it affects the animal.

According to Stedman's Dictionary, disease is an interruption, cessation or disorder of body functions, systems or organs. Diseases may be obvious even to the untrained eye, or detectable only by sophisticated testing procedures (subclinical disease). Serious irreversible damage may be ...


G86-799 Health Management And Recommended Vaccinations For Dairy Replacements, Duane Rice, R. Gene White Jan 1986

G86-799 Health Management And Recommended Vaccinations For Dairy Replacements, Duane Rice, R. Gene White

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the importance of having a good vaccination schedule, and provides recommendations on which vaccinations to give, depending on variables. Correct management decisions are necessary to realize maximum returns on investments in any dairy operation. Dairymen sometimes assume there is a quick remedy for health problems, but the prevention of disease is by far less expensive. Preventing health problems in the dairy herd goes much further than using a veterinarian to treat individual animals with emergency problems. A veterinarian with experience and a genuine interest in dairy cattle is essential to assist the dairyman with herd health problems ...


G86-794 Enterotoxemia In Lambs, Dale M. Grotelueschen, Duane N. Rice Jan 1986

G86-794 Enterotoxemia In Lambs, Dale M. Grotelueschen, Duane N. Rice

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the causes, clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention methods of this potentially fatal disease.

Enterotoxemia, which is also known as "overeating" or "pulpy kidney" disease, is a highly significant and costly disease problem for the sheep industry. Proper preventive practices are strongly recommended to sheep producers in order to avoid death loss from this disease.

The word "enterotoxemia" can be broken down into three parts that can be an aid in understanding the disease. The term "entero" refers to intestine; "tox" refers to toxin or poison; and "emia" refers to blood. Thus, from "intestinal toxin in the ...


G86-790 Fumigating Farm-Stored Grain With Aluminum Phosphide (Revised May 1998), Clyde Ogg, David L. Keith Jan 1986

G86-790 Fumigating Farm-Stored Grain With Aluminum Phosphide (Revised May 1998), Clyde Ogg, David L. Keith

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide provides step-by-step instructions for fumigating stored grain on the farm with aluminum phosphide.

Fumigants act on all insect life stages. They control pests by diffusing through the air spaces between grain kernels as well as into the kernel itself. Fumigants are able to penetrate into places that are inaccessible to insecticide sprays or dusts.

Regardless of formulation, all fumigants are poisonous and toxic to humans and other warm-blooded animals as well as to insects and other pests. Because fumigant chemicals are highly toxic and hazardous to use, they are Restricted Use pesticides. They can only be used by ...


G86-807 Where Do Weeds Come From?, John Furrer, Robert G. Wilson Jan 1986

G86-807 Where Do Weeds Come From?, John Furrer, Robert G. Wilson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses weed seed entry and loss from the soil, and provides examples of the density and diversity of the soil weed seed population. Weed Seed in the Soil Most weeds owe their beginning to seed in the soil. The soil acts as a seed storage reservoir and a growth medium for weedy plants. The kind or species and numbers of seed in the soil is closely linked to the cropping history of the land. Grasslands contain seed associated with grassland plants and cropland contains seed affiliated with weeds growing on cultivated land. Grasslands that have been cultivated and ...


G86-825 Existing Buildings--Remodel Or Abandon?, Gerald R. Bodman, David P. Shelton Jan 1986

G86-825 Existing Buildings--Remodel Or Abandon?, Gerald R. Bodman, David P. Shelton

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Just because a building is there does not mean that remodeling is the best option. Here are ten factors of prime importance when deciding if a building is suitable for remodeling.

As livestock production enterprises change, many producers ask, "Should I remodel this building or abandon it and start over?" A sound answer requires careful evaluation of the intended use of the building being considered for remodeling. The immediate future and projected long range production goals must be considered. We've all read about successful remodeling projects, but few of us ever hear about the large number of remodeling projects ...


G86-796 Growing Degree Day Requirements And Freeze Risk As A Guide To Selecting And Planting Corn Hybrids, Ralph E. Neild Jan 1986

G86-796 Growing Degree Day Requirements And Freeze Risk As A Guide To Selecting And Planting Corn Hybrids, Ralph E. Neild

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the growing degree day requirements for Nebraska's four corn-growing regions, and how using these requirements can aid in planting date decisions.

Variations between locations, between seasons at a particular location, between planting times at a particular location and season, and between the requirements of different hybrids result in differences in the number of days it takes for corn to mature. These variations in days are all closely related to differences in temperatures when the corn is being grown.


G86-803 Assessing Hail Damage To Corn, J.J. Vorst Jan 1986

G86-803 Assessing Hail Damage To Corn, J.J. Vorst

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication examines how hail damages the corn plant, how the degree of damage can be determined and how the extent of yield loss is estimated.

In the U.S., approximately half of all hailstorms occur between March and May. These early storms are responsible for only minor corn yield losses, however, because the corn either has not yet been planted or is too small to be damaged significantly. Even when fields are severely damaged early in the growing season, they can often be replanted.

On the other hand, about a third of all hailstorms occur between June and September ...


G86-811 High Quality Seed Wheat, Lenis Alton Nelson Jan 1986

G86-811 High Quality Seed Wheat, Lenis Alton Nelson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses high quality winter wheat, the options farmers have in obtaining high quality seed, seed size, year-old seed, seed treatment, and replanting the same seed year after year. Winter wheat uniquely allows the least time between the harvest of one crop and the planting of the next of any annual crop. This short time period may necessitate making a hurried decision about the seed to be planted. In the end, the farmer must be responsible for planting good, high quality seed. The phrase "high quality seed wheat" means different things to different people. High quality wheat seed is ...