Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Agriculture

1981

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Education

G81-556 Using The California Mastitis Test (Cmt) To Detect Subclinical Mastitis, Duane N. Rice Jan 1981

G81-556 Using The California Mastitis Test (Cmt) To Detect Subclinical Mastitis, Duane N. Rice

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Apparently healthy cows can harbor subclinical mastitis, which creates tremendous loss in milk production. This NebGuide offers a method for detecting this disease.

The dairyman is generally aware of clinical mastitis because it can be seen as changes in the milk, swollen udder and other signs exhibited by the cow. Compared with subclinical mastitis, clinical mastitis is much less costly, is of short duration, tends to be an individual cow problem, and is detected without special tests.

Unfortunately, the apparently healthy cow can harbor subclinical mastitis, which creates tremendous loss in milk production. A cow with subclinical mastitis does not ...


G81-541 The Home Laying Flock, Part I Getting Started, Earl W. Gleaves Jan 1981

G81-541 The Home Laying Flock, Part I Getting Started, Earl W. Gleaves

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide tells what is involved in starting a home laying flock.

Home egg operations have maintained popularity in Nebraska. These small flocks provide a means for producing high quality food at home. They also provide the opportunity for young people to learn the responsibility of caring for animals. A well planned, well managed home flock can be a source of personal pleasure and sometimes a source of low-cost eggs.


G81-551 Ecofarming: Spring Row Crop Planting And Weed Control In Winter Wheat Stubble, Gail A. Wicks, Norman L. Klocke Jan 1981

G81-551 Ecofarming: Spring Row Crop Planting And Weed Control In Winter Wheat Stubble, Gail A. Wicks, Norman L. Klocke

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Weed control, stubble management and planters for planting in winter wheat stubble are covered here.

Planting corn, sorghum or soybeans into untilled, weed-free winter wheat stubble that is 10 months old is an accepted practice in the Central Great Plains States. In Nebraska, this system is known as ecofallow. Treating the stubble with herbicides following wheat harvest (ecofallow) offers several advantages:

Weed and volunteer wheat growth can be eliminated. Weed growth robs valuable moisture that could be used by the next year's crop.

Standing stubble provides an excellent snow trap during the winter. Snow melt can provide moisture for ...


G81-546 Ecofarming: Fallow Aids In Winter Wheat-Fallow Rotation, Gail A. Wicks, Charles R. Fenster Jan 1981

G81-546 Ecofarming: Fallow Aids In Winter Wheat-Fallow Rotation, Gail A. Wicks, Charles R. Fenster

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the use of ecofarming to control weeds and manage crop residues.

Ecofarming is defined as a system of controlling weeds and managing crop residues throughout a crop rotation with minimum use of tillage so as to reduce soil erosion and production costs while increasing weed control, water infiltration, moisture conservation and crop yields. Energy requirements are much lower with ecofallow than with normal fallow systems. The ecofallow period in the 3-year rotation is the period between wheat or other small grain harvest and the planting of corn or sorghum. The fallow period in the 2-year rotation occurs ...