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Full-Text Articles in Education

"They Can't Expect To Be Treated Like Normal Americans So Soon": Reconceptualizing Latinx Immigrants In Social Studies Education, Ramon Vasquez Mar 2018

"They Can't Expect To Be Treated Like Normal Americans So Soon": Reconceptualizing Latinx Immigrants In Social Studies Education, Ramon Vasquez

Journal of Critical Thought and Praxis

This autoethnography examines the experiences of an assistant professor of elementary social studies methods at a predominantly White institution (PWI). Drawing on the Latina/o Critical Race Theory (LatCrit) methodology of testimonio, the assistant professor in this study, who self-identifies as Chicano, intentionally situates Latinx immigration counter-narratives as oppositional stories to the master narrative of “who belongs.” Using a Critical Race Theory (CRT) framework for analysis, this paper argues that counter-narratives serve as necessary correctives for reconceptualizing racist, essentialist, and nativist master narratives. This paper shows how social studies education courses in teacher preparation programs (TEPs) can serve as sites ...


Examining The Intersection Of Teachers' Expectations, African American Males, And Equitable Strategies, Adell Cothorne Jan 2018

Examining The Intersection Of Teachers' Expectations, African American Males, And Equitable Strategies, Adell Cothorne

Walden Dissertations and Doctoral Studies

Elementary African American males achieve proficiency at a lower rate than their peers in both reading and math. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to understand how elementary school teachers described their use of equitable strategies in teaching elementary African American male students, how these teachers described the experience of teaching African American male students, and how they used equitable strategies to shape the classroom environment to engage African American male students. Two theories provided the conceptual framework for this study-human development theory and critical race theory in education. Seven participants were selected through convenience sampling. Semistructured interviews ...