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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Education

How Much Do Monographs Cost? And Why Should We Care?, Nancy L. Maron, Charles Watkinson, Meredith Kahn, Shayna Pekala Oct 2016

How Much Do Monographs Cost? And Why Should We Care?, Nancy L. Maron, Charles Watkinson, Meredith Kahn, Shayna Pekala

Charleston Library Conference

What does it cost to make a high quality, digital monograph? What may sound like an obvious question turns out to be a very knotty one, driving to the heart of the essence of scholarly publishing today. It is particularly relevant in an environment where the potential of a sustainable open access (OA) business model for monographs is being explored. Two complementary studies funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation in 2015 have explored this question to understand the costs involved in creating and disseminating scholarly books.

The team at Ithaka S+R studied the full costs of publishing monographs ...


Teaching The Library To Students Of Higher Education, Steven Weiland Oct 2016

Teaching The Library To Students Of Higher Education, Steven Weiland

Charleston Library Conference

The academic library and its digital transformation are ignored in graduate programs of higher education administration, which train a significant number of postsecondary professionals. A course in scholarly communications in the digital age recently introduced at one such program includes an invitation to aspiring administrators to study the contributions of the library to the ways that faculty members are coming to understand and capitalize on new technologies in teaching, research, and career development. The library is represented in the course in its traditional and new roles. It is an essential campus location for attention to what technological change means for ...


Money, Money, Money—Or Not! Budget Realities And Transparency In Collection Development Decision‐Making, Mary Gilbert, Deborah A. Nolan Oct 2016

Money, Money, Money—Or Not! Budget Realities And Transparency In Collection Development Decision‐Making, Mary Gilbert, Deborah A. Nolan

Charleston Library Conference

Each library’s budget is unique; however, the importance of providing information about the budget is common across all libraries and is a critical factor in how the library is perceived by its constituents. The cost of e‐resources, balancing the collection, and optimizing a flat budget in an era of escalating costs are issues often misinterpreted by the campus community, leading to both misunderstandings and misinformation. Limited budgets, escalating prices, and new acquisitions strategies necessitate clear communication with librarians and faculty about the financial realities and complex decisions surrounding collection development.

One academic library used a two‐day workshop ...


“Flip This House”: “Back Of The House” Library Staff Engaging The Wider Campus Community, Patrick J. Roth, Jeffrey D. Daniels Oct 2016

“Flip This House”: “Back Of The House” Library Staff Engaging The Wider Campus Community, Patrick J. Roth, Jeffrey D. Daniels

Charleston Library Conference

Procuring and describing content for discoverability are as important now as they ever have been, but we suggest that a successful organization should expect more from faculty and staff members. As technical skill sets become more in demand, “back of the house” staff need to step to the front. In this article we explore how two Grand Valley State University Libraries back of the house departments have partnered with other organizations on campus. Collaboration has reenergized the staff, raised the Libraries’s profile, and contributed to the Libraries’s overall success.


The 2014 Credo Survey, Allen Mckiel Oct 2016

The 2014 Credo Survey, Allen Mckiel

Charleston Library Conference

The Credo Survey addressed student research skills. Two parallel surveys over the same questions were addressed separately to students and faculty, which had respectively 2,606 and 472 respondents. Just less than 90% of the students were undergraduates split nearly evenly in progress to completion, with 87% of respondents attending full‐time and a fairly representative spread of majors. Just less than 50% of the faculty had taught over 10 years with nearly even proportions spread across the first 10 years and with a representative sampling of disciplines. Seventy‐seven percent were full‐time. The majority of responses came from ...


Creating The Sandbox: The Juxtaposition Of Collections And Student Development, Helen Salmon, Linda Graburn Oct 2016

Creating The Sandbox: The Juxtaposition Of Collections And Student Development, Helen Salmon, Linda Graburn

Charleston Library Conference

While academic library collections are typically built and assessed in relation to pedagogical or curricular needs and accreditation processes, they can also be intentionally developed, accessed, and promoted with more conscious attention to the developmental needs and context of the students who will use them. This paper will explore the roles that academic library collections play in relation to the psychosocial development of young adults. Drawing upon contemporary learning and young adult development theory, we will situate the role of academic library collections in relation to the various developmental stages, tasks, and learning challenges that young adults experience during a ...


A Crossroads For Collection Development And Assessment, Its Fallout, And Unknowns: Where Do We Go From Here?, Thomas Reich Oct 2016

A Crossroads For Collection Development And Assessment, Its Fallout, And Unknowns: Where Do We Go From Here?, Thomas Reich

Charleston Library Conference

Where do we go from here? Achieving goals of sustainable resource collections through a thorough collection assessment is evermore challenged by fallout and unknowns lurking ubiquitously. There is an ever‐increasing competition for both physical space and economic space. We’re at an important crossroads for collection development, collection assessment, and libraries themselves. Change and assessment must be sustainable. To be effective, change must create its own momentum. Three years into our collection assessment project, momentum has been steady and efforts continue. However, we’ve encountered fallout and unknowns which we hadn’t planned on, and these are of an ...