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Full-Text Articles in Education

Workplace Incivility And Bullying In The Library: Perception Or Reality?, Shin Freedman, Dawn L. Vreven Oct 2016

Workplace Incivility And Bullying In The Library: Perception Or Reality?, Shin Freedman, Dawn L. Vreven

Shin Freedman

Recent media reports have increased awareness of workplace incivility and bullying. However, the literature regarding workplace incivility and bullying in academic libraries is under reported and under researched. This study examines the current state of librarians’ perceptions on workplace incivility and bullying and evaluates the effects of bullying from organizational and individual perspectives. Bullying was measured based on the librarian’s responses to the Negative Acts Questionnaire, including both experienced bullying and witnessed bullying. The authors introduce a conceptual framework to understand the motivating structures, precipitating circumstances, and enabling structures that lead to bullying in the library. A statistical analysis ...


Undergraduate Students’ Perceptions Of The Impact Of Pre-College Computing Activities On Choices Of Major, Monica M. Mcgill, Adrienne Decker, Amber Settle Oct 2016

Undergraduate Students’ Perceptions Of The Impact Of Pre-College Computing Activities On Choices Of Major, Monica M. Mcgill, Adrienne Decker, Amber Settle

Amber Settle

A lack of diversity in the computing field has existed for several decades, and although female participation in computing remains low, outreach programs attempting to address the situation are now quite numerous. To begin to understand whether or not these past activities have had long-term impact, we conducted a systematic literature review. Upon discovering that longitudinal studies were lacking, we investigated whether undergraduate students believed that their participation in computing activities prior to college contributed to their decision to major in a computing field. From the 770 participants in the study, we discovered that approximately 20% of males and 24 ...


When Will My Cover Be Blown? The Experience Of Imposter Syndrome In Emerging And Early Career Academics/Educators, Amy Bannatyne Sep 2016

When Will My Cover Be Blown? The Experience Of Imposter Syndrome In Emerging And Early Career Academics/Educators, Amy Bannatyne

Amy Bannatyne

What is imposter syndrome?

Fraud, luck, deceit, and incompetent – these terms describe the thoughts and feelings frequently endured during an internal process known as “imposter syndrome”. The syndrome was first described in 1978, after two female psychologists observed a consistent constellation of symptoms and concerns in 150 highly successful women (Clance & Imes, 1978). Despite successful completion of advanced degrees, obtaining high scores on standardised aptitude tests, and holding various leadership positions, many of the women appeared unable to internalise their success and expressed strong feelings of inadequacy and incompetency (Hoang, 2015).


Nurturing Compassion Development Among College Students: A Longitudinal Study, Thomas G. Plante, Katherine Halman Aug 2016

Nurturing Compassion Development Among College Students: A Longitudinal Study, Thomas G. Plante, Katherine Halman

Thomas G Plante PhD, ABPP

Little research exists on the development of compassion among college undergraduates. This study tracks changes in compassion and identifies factors associated with these changes over the course of undergraduate students’ college careers, from the time of admittance to the time of graduation. Compassion levels assessed at the point of college entrance accounted for 25% of the variance in compassion at the time of graduation. These findings provided evidence for the notion that compassion can continue to be cultivated once in college. Predictors such as diversity training, the frequency of religious service attendance, participation in community-based service-learning, political identification, and feeling ...


"But I Already Know All About Sex!" Distinguishing Beliefs From Empirical Facts When Teaching Sex, Gender, And Sexuality, Sarah Grison Jul 2016

"But I Already Know All About Sex!" Distinguishing Beliefs From Empirical Facts When Teaching Sex, Gender, And Sexuality, Sarah Grison

Sarah Grison

This slide presentation addresses teaching the biological aspects of human sexuality in psychology courses, and encourages instructors to create a safe environment to help student differentiate between beliefs and empirical facts about sexuality, sexual orientation, and gender identity. Encourages using visuals that help organize information and using real-world examples, providing examples of both.


Evidence-Based Teaching And Learning: From Theory To Practice, Sarah Grison May 2016

Evidence-Based Teaching And Learning: From Theory To Practice, Sarah Grison

Sarah Grison

Evidence-based teaching and learning provides theoretical and practical ways for teachers to use research-supported pedagogies to augment student educational experiences. This presentation provides guidelines and suggestions about how to implement evidence-based teaching techniques, conduct classroom research, and help improve teaching skills and student educational experience. Methods to support text reading, and multiple ways to learn material (student response systems, online homework tools and quizzes, etc.) are suggested.


Using Low-Stakes Repeated Testing Can Improve Student Learning: How (Some) Practice Makes Perfect, Sarah Grison, Steven G. Luke, Aya Shigeto, Patrick D.K. Watson May 2016

Using Low-Stakes Repeated Testing Can Improve Student Learning: How (Some) Practice Makes Perfect, Sarah Grison, Steven G. Luke, Aya Shigeto, Patrick D.K. Watson

Sarah Grison

Two studies in Introductory Psychology classes explored whether repeated low-stakes testing can augment learning. In Experiment 1, answering more in-class questions with student response systems (SRSs) predicted better learning when students had not read the text. In Experiment 2, taking online practice quizzes predicted better learning, especially when questions on a concept were grouped. Repeated low-stakes testing can aid learning, but we must develop evidence-based pedagogical tools to maximize effects.


Practice Makes Perfect: Improving Learning Of At-Risk Students, Patrick D.K. Watson, Sarah Grison, Steven G. Luke, Aya Shigeto May 2016

Practice Makes Perfect: Improving Learning Of At-Risk Students, Patrick D.K. Watson, Sarah Grison, Steven G. Luke, Aya Shigeto

Sarah Grison

29 graduate TAs and 1 faculty member teach 2700 Introductory Psychology students annually. This year we developed an assessment program to improve student learning and graduate teaching training (Shigeto et al., 2010). We studied the value of pedagogical tools developed for students in the Educational Opportunities Program (EOP). EOP selects students based on demographics and academic vulnerabilities for a special intro psych section. This section has an extra day per week for content presentation and additional student development support. These interventions have been demonstrated to enhance learning in minority students (Treisman, 1992).


Beyond “Remember” And “Understand”: Can Online Homework Tools Augment Students’ Higher Order Thinking Skills?, Crystal Carlson, Genevieve M. Henricks-Lepp, Sarah Grison May 2016

Beyond “Remember” And “Understand”: Can Online Homework Tools Augment Students’ Higher Order Thinking Skills?, Crystal Carlson, Genevieve M. Henricks-Lepp, Sarah Grison

Sarah Grison

We studied the effectiveness of an Introductory Psychology online homework tool with questions that required lower or higher level thinking skills (Remember, Understand, Apply, Analyze, Evaluate). Interestingly, results suggested that both student performance and attitudes are influenced by question level and question type (Matching, Multiple Choice, Drag and Drop, etc.).


Best Practices In Using Student Response Systems (Srs), Sarah Grison, Robert Bartsch May 2016

Best Practices In Using Student Response Systems (Srs), Sarah Grison, Robert Bartsch

Sarah Grison

These slides are from a workshop describing the various types of student response systems, the benefits of using SRS over other response methods, and the best practices for SRS to improve student learning. Guidance on implementing SRS and supporting resources for improving pedagogy are also included.


Evidence-Based Teaching And Learning: From Theory To Practice, Sarah Grison May 2016

Evidence-Based Teaching And Learning: From Theory To Practice, Sarah Grison

Sarah Grison

Teachers and educational institutions are currently experiencing a perfect storm: We must teach more students in a wider variety of course formats, appropriately support student learning, and also document student progress towards reaching learning objectives. But often, we must achieve these goals with fewer resources, less support and little training. Importantly, a practical approach called Evidence-Based Teaching and Learning can help us address these new challenges. First, this session will provide information about several evidence-based pedagogical techniques shown to improve student learning, including low-stakes repeated testing. Then we will move beyond theoretical ideas to provide examples of how an Introductory ...


Evidence-Based Teaching And Learning: Putting The Results Of Psychological Research To Work In Our Classrooms, Sarah Grison May 2016

Evidence-Based Teaching And Learning: Putting The Results Of Psychological Research To Work In Our Classrooms, Sarah Grison

Sarah Grison

If our pedagogical solutions are based on research they will have a high impact on student learning! Using evidence-based teaching methods will help student read and comprehend text, engage students in the classroom and with course materials, and improve student performance on tests. Methods addressed include assigning reading activities, repeated testing, and student response systems.


Because You Can't Teach It All And They Won't Read It All: Student Response Systems Do Improve Learning, Steven G. Luke, Sarah Grison, Aya Shigeto, Patrick D.K. Watson May 2016

Because You Can't Teach It All And They Won't Read It All: Student Response Systems Do Improve Learning, Steven G. Luke, Sarah Grison, Aya Shigeto, Patrick D.K. Watson

Sarah Grison

In Introductory Psychology, 30 graduate TAs/faculty teach 2700 students annually. This year we developed an assessment program to improve student learning and graduate teaching training (Shigeto et al., 2010). Part of the program studied the pedagogical value of using student response systems to answer in-class multiple choice questions. Prior research lacks scientific rigor and provides equivocal evidence that SRSs improve learning (Caldwell, 2007).


Apa Goal #5 Professional Development: Assessment Outcomes For Sophomore And Senior Psychology Majors, Eric Barlow, Talegria Brown, Kinsey Bolinder, R. Eric Landrum Apr 2016

Apa Goal #5 Professional Development: Assessment Outcomes For Sophomore And Senior Psychology Majors, Eric Barlow, Talegria Brown, Kinsey Bolinder, R. Eric Landrum

R. Eric Landrum

The objective of our study was to implement assessment measures concerning the professional development of psychology majors (APA Goal #5). Sophomore and senior-level psychology majors completed a battery of measures and we examined those outcomes for the expected developmental changes over time.


Measuring Apa Goal 2: Critical Thinking And The Psychology Major, Kinsey Bolinder, Eric Barlow, Talegria Brown, R. Eric Landrum Apr 2016

Measuring Apa Goal 2: Critical Thinking And The Psychology Major, Kinsey Bolinder, Eric Barlow, Talegria Brown, R. Eric Landrum

R. Eric Landrum

We studied 21 junior-level psychology majors and their critical thinking and statistical reasoning skills. Modifying the Lawson et al. (2015) scoring rubric, we measured both critical thinking ability and developed a new measure of statistical reasoning. Tese methods may help psychology educators assess student competence within APA Goal 2.


Apa Guidelines For The Undergraduate Psychology Major, Version 2.0, R. Eric Landrum Apr 2016

Apa Guidelines For The Undergraduate Psychology Major, Version 2.0, R. Eric Landrum

R. Eric Landrum

[No abstract available.]


To Go Or Not To Go: Graduate Study In Psychology, Talegria Brown, Kinsey Bolinder, Eric Barlow, Matthew Genuchi, R. Eric Landrum Apr 2016

To Go Or Not To Go: Graduate Study In Psychology, Talegria Brown, Kinsey Bolinder, Eric Barlow, Matthew Genuchi, R. Eric Landrum

R. Eric Landrum

We examined if providing students with resources can make a difference in the consideration of graduate school regarding self-efficacy, certainty, confidence, and awareness. Twenty-six first-year psychology majors were randomly assigned to one of four study conditions, and also completed a 16-item pretest-posttest survey about graduate school intentions.


Early Childhood/Child Welfare Priority, Nancy Edick, Samantha K. Ammons, Melissa Cast-Brede, Ann Coyne, Karen Falconer Al-Hindi, Shari Hofschire, Lisa Kelly-Vance, Jay Killion, Sajda Qureshi, Bridget O. Ryalls, Peter Simi, Peter Wolcott Apr 2016

Early Childhood/Child Welfare Priority, Nancy Edick, Samantha K. Ammons, Melissa Cast-Brede, Ann Coyne, Karen Falconer Al-Hindi, Shari Hofschire, Lisa Kelly-Vance, Jay Killion, Sajda Qureshi, Bridget O. Ryalls, Peter Simi, Peter Wolcott

Melissa Cast-Brede

This is the executive summary of a white paper that describes the context, current capacity, areas of opportunity, and next steps for the UNO Early Childhood/Child Welfare Priority (ECCW). It responds to the need for comprehensive integrated systems of services designed to give all young children (birth through age eight) access to what they need in the early years to succeed in school and in life. In this context, UNO recognizes ECCW as critical to our metropolitan university mission. Further, we must come together with early childhood service providers, P-12 districts, parents, policy makers, other University of Nebraska campuses ...


Ambient Knowledge: Human Capital Development Strategies For Us Economic Competitiveness, Antje Mays Feb 2016

Ambient Knowledge: Human Capital Development Strategies For Us Economic Competitiveness, Antje Mays

Antje Mays

Ongoing media coverage has made much of skill mismatches and their impacts on US employment conditions and global economic recovery. Recent research across business and education has uncovered skill shortages spanning technical and industry-specific competencies, higher-order cognitive skills such as analysis, critical thinking, and synthesis, as well as behavioral skills and values such as work ethic, integrity, and good citizenship. These US findings are echoed by executive opinion surveys and policy research by international researchers including as OECD, the World Economic Forum, and the World Bank. As human capital theory points out, the social fabric and economic soundness of nations ...


Above-Level Test Item Functioning Across Examinee Age Groups, Russell Warne, Kristine Doty, Anne Marie Malbica, Victor Angeles, Scott Innes, Jared Hall, Kelli Masterson-Nixon Jan 2016

Above-Level Test Item Functioning Across Examinee Age Groups, Russell Warne, Kristine Doty, Anne Marie Malbica, Victor Angeles, Scott Innes, Jared Hall, Kelli Masterson-Nixon

Russell T Warne

Above-level testing (also called above-grade testing, out-of-level testing, and off-level testing) is the practice of administering to a child a test that is designed for an examinee population that is older or in a more advanced grade. Above-level testing is frequently used to help educators design educational interventions for gifted children, especially those who may be candidates for grade skipping or Talent Search programs. However, little research has been conducted on how test items function when administered to a younger population, despite professional standards that require examiners to gather validity evidence when administering a test for a new population. In ...


If You Can’T Take The Heat, Stay Out Of The Kitchen: A Reflection On “Student Beliefs, Multiculturalism, And Client Welfare.”, Thomas G. Plante Jan 2016

If You Can’T Take The Heat, Stay Out Of The Kitchen: A Reflection On “Student Beliefs, Multiculturalism, And Client Welfare.”, Thomas G. Plante

Thomas G Plante PhD, ABPP

In Student beliefs, multiculturalism, and client welfare, Professor Kristin Hancock offers a thoughtful description of and reflection on the contemporary challenges associated with psychology graduate trainees managing their personal and religious beliefs and practices with the training and professional demands of the psychology profession and their educational training institutions. She reviewed several recent court cases (e.g., Ward v. Polite et al., Keeton v. Anderson-Wiley et al., Ward v. Wilbanks et al.) where psychology students sued their graduate programs (typically secular state universities) because their training requirements included multicultural competency training involving sexual issues such as homosexuality. These graduate training ...


Five Reasons To Put The G Back Into Giftedness: An Argument For Applying The Cattell–Horn–Carroll Theory Of Intelligence To Gifted Education Research And Practice, Russell Warne Dec 2015

Five Reasons To Put The G Back Into Giftedness: An Argument For Applying The Cattell–Horn–Carroll Theory Of Intelligence To Gifted Education Research And Practice, Russell Warne

Russell T Warne

Human intelligence (also called general intelligence, g, or Spearman’s g) is a highly useful psychological construct. Yet, since the middle of the 20th century, gifted education researchers have been reluctant to discuss human intelligence. The purpose of this article is to persuade gifted education researchers and practitioners to reincorporate modern human intelligence theory (as expressed in Cattell–Horn–Carroll, or CHC, theory) and research into their work on gifted children. There are five reasons to make intelligence part of gifted education research: (a) intelligence is one of the best studied constructs in psychology; (b) educators know more about how ...


Social Physique Anxiety And Body Image Of Middle School Youth: A Longitudinal Study (Fffa2016-Web.Pdf), Mary Jo Maccracken, Robert E. Stadulis Dec 2015

Social Physique Anxiety And Body Image Of Middle School Youth: A Longitudinal Study (Fffa2016-Web.Pdf), Mary Jo Maccracken, Robert E. Stadulis

Dr. Mary J. MacCracken

Adolescents confronted with bodily changes and weight control problems may develop
a special type of anxiety (called social physique anxiety or SPA) related to their body
build. The present investigation attempted to determine if SPA, as assessed by the
Social Physique Anxiety Scale for Children (SPAS-C: Fender-Scarr, et al., 2003a, 2003b,
Stadulis, et al., 2005), persists or changes over age. The current study tries to discern if
changes in body composition (Body Mass Index or BMI) from year to year are associated
with changes in anxiety. Children’s perceptions of their physique (actual) as well
as ideal body physique were ...


Reasoning About Race And Pedagogy In Two Preservice Science Teachers: A Critical Race Theory Analysis, Douglas B. Larkin, Tanya Maloney, Gail M. Perry-Ryder Dec 2015

Reasoning About Race And Pedagogy In Two Preservice Science Teachers: A Critical Race Theory Analysis, Douglas B. Larkin, Tanya Maloney, Gail M. Perry-Ryder

Douglas B. Larkin

This study describes the experiences of two preservice science teachers as they progress through their respective teacher education programs, and uses critical race theory to examine the manner in which conceptions about race and its pedagogical implications change over time. Using a longitudinal case study method, participants’ conceptual ecologies of race and pedagogy are mapped both before and after student teaching, and each case is analyzed for evidence of conceptual change in these
areas. Findings show that conceptions about race and the pedagogical implications of race changed in ways that likely would have gone undetected in earlier studies because they ...