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2015

Faculty Publications

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Full-Text Articles in Education

Accomodating Students With Disabilities In Higher Education, Carletta Witzel, Luana Greulich, James Jeffery Dec 2015

Accomodating Students With Disabilities In Higher Education, Carletta Witzel, Luana Greulich, James Jeffery

Faculty Publications

Students who choose to attend Seventh-day Adventist colleges and universities often do so because they want to experience the unique Christian worldview that permeates the curriculum. Many want more than a school where religious classes are taught— they expect the entire curriculum to be infused with Seventh-day Adventist values. Students with disabilities who enroll in Adventist colleges and universities desire these same college experiences. Recent figures (2012) released by the United States government show that almost 11 percent of undergraduates across the nation (almost two million students) have one or more disabilities. Approximately 15 percent of these have mobility impairments ...


Interview With Joe Freidhoff: A Bird's Eye View Of K-12 Online Learning, Leslie Pourreau Dec 2015

Interview With Joe Freidhoff: A Bird's Eye View Of K-12 Online Learning, Leslie Pourreau

Faculty Publications

This article showcases an interview conducted with Dr. Joe Freidhoff, Executive Director of the Michigan Virtual Learning Research Institute, specifically for this special issue of the OLC Online Learning Journal. The perspectives provided by Dr. Freidhoff on the ever-changing field of K-12 online learning served two purposes: to introduce long-time profession-based journal readership to the field of K-12 online learning and to provide K-12 online learning scholars with perspective and direction for meeting the current and future needs of K-12 stakeholders.


Special Needs Children And Mental Health, Nancy J. Carbonell Dec 2015

Special Needs Children And Mental Health, Nancy J. Carbonell

Faculty Publications

What do these stories have in common? They are representative of many students who experience learning difficulties while at the same time struggling with mental or emotional issues. Special-needs teachers see children like Brandon, Carmen, and Jake in their classrooms every day. It is estimated that in the U.S., 37 percent of children with special needs also need mental-health care. That is approximately one in every three special-needs students! This is particularly challenging for teachers whose training did not include how to deal with children experiencing mental-health issues.


Oregon Reading Instructional Materials And Practices Statewide Survey Executive Summary, Sue Lenski, Dot Mcelhone, Mindy Legard Larson, Maika Yeigh, Carol Lauritzen, Amanda Villagómez, Dennis Davis, Marie Lejeune, Melanie Landon-Hays Nov 2015

Oregon Reading Instructional Materials And Practices Statewide Survey Executive Summary, Sue Lenski, Dot Mcelhone, Mindy Legard Larson, Maika Yeigh, Carol Lauritzen, Amanda Villagómez, Dennis Davis, Marie Lejeune, Melanie Landon-Hays

Faculty Publications

This study reports the results of a survey of a representative sample of 1,206 K-6 classroom and 7-12 English Language Arts teachers in Oregon to learn 1) what reading instructional materials are currently being used, 2) what reading instructional materials teachers would prefer, 3) what reading instructional materials teachers wanted to have included on the state approved materials list, and 4) what instructional practices teachers use. Results indicated that in grades K-6 basal/core reading programs were the predominant material in use, but that these teachers preferred to use trade books. The majority of grades 7-12 English Language Arts ...


Examining Inclusive Programming In A Middle School Library: A Case Study Of Adolescents Who Are Differently- And Typically-Able, Clayton A. Copeland, Karen W. Gavigan Dr. Nov 2015

Examining Inclusive Programming In A Middle School Library: A Case Study Of Adolescents Who Are Differently- And Typically-Able, Clayton A. Copeland, Karen W. Gavigan Dr.

Faculty Publications

Numerous national and international studies have shown the importance of school libraries and librarians in students’ educations, including literacy skill development and academic achievement. However, published research investigating school library accessibility and services from the perspectives of students who are differently-able are extremely limited, as are studies of inclusive library programming, or programming serving both typically-able and differently-able students. This case study examines inclusive library programming with adolescents in a middle school library. Findings indicate that the impact of inclusive school library programming was meaningful and often extended beyond the library’s walls. Inclusive library programming resulted in skill development ...


#Aulivewholly, Patricia Spangler Oct 2015

#Aulivewholly, Patricia Spangler

Faculty Publications

Andrews University officially launched its new University Health & Wellness initiative on Wednesday, September 23. The initiative will integrate five deeply connected pillars: physical, spiritual, mental, relational and professional wellness, but mainly focus on physical health and wellness to address the gaps that have been identified.


Acute Exercise And Oxidative Stress: Crossfit™ Vs. Treadmill Bout, Brian Kliszczewicz, Quindry C. John, Blessing L. Daniel, Oliver D. Gretchen Oct 2015

Acute Exercise And Oxidative Stress: Crossfit™ Vs. Treadmill Bout, Brian Kliszczewicz, Quindry C. John, Blessing L. Daniel, Oliver D. Gretchen

Faculty Publications

CrossFit™, a popular high-intensity training modality, has been the subject of scrutiny, with concerns of elevated risk of injury and health. Despite these concerns empirical evidence regarding physiologic stresses including acute oxidative stress is lacking. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation was to examine the acute redox response to a CrossFit™ bout. Furthermore, these findings were compared to a high-intensity treadmill bout as a point of reference. Ten males 26.4 ± 2.7 yrs having three or more months of CrossFit™ experience participated in the present study. Blood plasma was collected at four time points: Pre-exercise (PRE), immediately-post-exercise (IPE), 1 ...


A Student-Centered Guest Lecturing: A Constructivism Approach To Promote Student Engagement, Lei Li, Rong Guo Oct 2015

A Student-Centered Guest Lecturing: A Constructivism Approach To Promote Student Engagement, Lei Li, Rong Guo

Faculty Publications

Student engagement has become a big challenge in higher education, especially when distance learning is getting more and more popular. Guest lecturing is a popular method to bring relevance to the classroom and engage in students. Ground on the theory of constructivism, this paper introduces a student-centered guest lecturing that allows students to work in team and participate in each step of process, such as preparation, interviewing, and reflection. Our pilot study showed that the proposed approach can effectively engage in students. The research methodology and plan are presented and the implications of the study are discussed.


Teaching Progress: A Critique Of The Grand Narrative Of Human Rights As Pedagogy For Marginalized Students, Mikaila Mariel Lemonik Arthur, Robyn Linde Oct 2015

Teaching Progress: A Critique Of The Grand Narrative Of Human Rights As Pedagogy For Marginalized Students, Mikaila Mariel Lemonik Arthur, Robyn Linde

Faculty Publications

Drawing on our experience as professors who teach human rights, social justice, and social movements courses at an urban college in Providence, R.I., with a student body that includes large populations who are of color, first generation, economically disadvantaged, and nontraditional in other ways, we explore the relevance and impact of these grand narratives for the lives of our students and their sense of political agency. In particular, we advocate for a critical approach to human rights pedagogy to counter and overcome the pervasive individualization that undergirds the grand narrative of human rights. We argue that a critical (and ...


Teaching Argument Writing And "Content" In Diverse Middle School History Classrooms, Chauncey Monte-Sano, Susan De La Paz, Mark Felton Sep 2015

Teaching Argument Writing And "Content" In Diverse Middle School History Classrooms, Chauncey Monte-Sano, Susan De La Paz, Mark Felton

Faculty Publications

Monte-Sano et al describe a program in which they worked with curriculum leaders in an academically and culturally diverse school district to develop materials and techniques that would strengthen middle school students' skills in making arguments and using evidence in historical essays. They outline the Shays' Rebellion investigation activity, which enable students to develop inquiry and literacy practices as they integrate critical reading, historical thinking, and argument writing.


Short Report: Raising Children Bilingually, Henriette Langdon Jun 2015

Short Report: Raising Children Bilingually, Henriette Langdon

Faculty Publications

The purpose of this article is to describe the process of becoming bilingual by sharing my own experience being raised in a four-language environment and how it influenced the upbringing of my daughter in two, and subsequently three languages. The other purpose is to dispel the myth that children with language, developmental and/or intellectual impairments or those diagnosed as being on the autism spectrum cannot or should not be exposed to two languages because it is confusing, or because they simply cannot handle two languages due to their disability. As a bilingual speech and language pathologist (SLP) who has ...


Virtual Peer Teams: Connecting Students With The Online Work Environment, Thalia Anagnos, Alicia Lyman-Holt, Sean Brophy Jun 2015

Virtual Peer Teams: Connecting Students With The Online Work Environment, Thalia Anagnos, Alicia Lyman-Holt, Sean Brophy

Faculty Publications

This study examined the potential of online collaboration tools to develop team cohesiveness and research skills of undergraduates participating in Virtual Peer Teams (VPTs) in a geographically distributed research experience for undergraduates (REU). The VPTs mimic geographically dispersed virtual teams that are now common in industry. VPTs consisted of four to six students from multiple REU sites around the United States who were asked to experiment with various collaboration and social network technologies to complete specified research-based and social tasks. Surveys were used to collect formative and summative feedback. Students agreed their VPT experiences were significant in their professional development ...


Expanding Intersectionality: Fictive Kinship Networks As Supports For The Educational Aspirations Of Black Women, Daniella Ann Cook, Tiffany J. Williams Jun 2015

Expanding Intersectionality: Fictive Kinship Networks As Supports For The Educational Aspirations Of Black Women, Daniella Ann Cook, Tiffany J. Williams

Faculty Publications

In this article, we use the concepts o f fictive kinship networks (Cook, 2011; Fordham, 1996; Stack, 1974) and intersectionality (Crenshaw, 1991) to explore the deeply embedded attitudes found in certain religious doctrine about the value o f education for Black females and how these beliefs shape the educational aspirations o f Black females. Especially for Black women from more conservative, religious backgrounds, we identify fictive kinship networks as important to creating the vital emotional, spiritual and intellectual spaces necessary to imagine and explore educational possibilities. As an important protective factor, a fundamental function of fictive kin relationships is the ...


Global Technology Experiences For Upper-Division Engineering Students: An Assessment, Patricia Backer, Wenchiang Chung Jun 2015

Global Technology Experiences For Upper-Division Engineering Students: An Assessment, Patricia Backer, Wenchiang Chung

Faculty Publications

In order for students to thrive in the highly competitive global economy, it is critical for them to develop international perspectives and appreciation. As a result, in 2004, the San Jose State University’s Charles W. Davidson College of Engineering established a one-million-dollar Global Technology Initiative (GTI) program. The mission of the GTI program is to expand students’ horizons about the opportunities and challenges of a global economy, to expose them to global, environmental, and energy problems in which technology plays a central role, to motivate their learning of global issues and different cultures, and to introduce them to a ...


From “Outsider” To “Bridge”: The Changing Role Of University Supervision In An Urban Teacher Residency Program, Wendy Gardiner, Janet Lorch May 2015

From “Outsider” To “Bridge”: The Changing Role Of University Supervision In An Urban Teacher Residency Program, Wendy Gardiner, Janet Lorch

Faculty Publications

This qualitative research study investigated a faculty liaison (FL) model, an alternative to traditional field supervision implemented in an urban teacher residency (UTR) program. In the FL model, professors teaching in the UTR program were assigned to school sites rather than individual teacher candidates to observe and provide feedback, evaluate teacher candidate performance, and connect coursework and classroom practice. Results indicate strong support for the continuation of the FL model in lieu of traditional supervision. Specifically, the FL model supported teacher candidate learning, both in the field and in university coursework; and enhanced school-university collaboration. The authors provide an analysis ...


Teachers’ Efficacy For Supporting At-Risk Students And Their Perceived Role In Dropout Prevention, Kimberly Knesting-Lund, Brent O'Rourke, Anthony Gabriele May 2015

Teachers’ Efficacy For Supporting At-Risk Students And Their Perceived Role In Dropout Prevention, Kimberly Knesting-Lund, Brent O'Rourke, Anthony Gabriele

Faculty Publications

Research on the construct of teacher efficacy has demonstrated its positive relationship to a number of student outcomes, such as improved academic achievement, increased levels of self-efficacy, and a stronger belief in their ability to solve a math task and their motivation for completing it. Based on these findings, this research considered the possibility that teacher efficacy for supporting at-risk students could be related to their understanding of high school dropout, potentially suggesting ways to improve schools’ dropout prevention efforts. This study was an initial exploration of the relationship between high school teachers’ perceived efficacy for supporting at-risk students and ...


The Practical Value Of A Liberal Education, James J. Koelbl May 2015

The Practical Value Of A Liberal Education, James J. Koelbl

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Journal Of College Student Retention_ Research, Theory & Practice-2015-Kerby-1521025115578229.Pdf, Molly Kerby May 2015

Journal Of College Student Retention_ Research, Theory & Practice-2015-Kerby-1521025115578229.Pdf, Molly Kerby

Faculty Publications

Theoretical models designed to predict whether students will persist or not have been valuable tools for retention efforts relative to the creation of services in academic and student affairs. Some of the early models attempted to explain and measure factors in the college dropout process. For example, in his seminal work, Tinto defined retention as a longitudinal process incorporating both the academic potential of the student and institutional social systems, thus creating a directional model based on continual variance in social commitments that influence academic performance. Others expanded the earlier theoretical models to test the predictive capabilities of these models ...


Looking Within: Teacher Critical Self-Reflection On Language And Cultural Integration In Multilingual Schools, Kathryn Brooks, Katya Karathanos, Susan Adams Apr 2015

Looking Within: Teacher Critical Self-Reflection On Language And Cultural Integration In Multilingual Schools, Kathryn Brooks, Katya Karathanos, Susan Adams

Faculty Publications

Genor (2005) proposed a framework for teacher reflection that included three stages of reflection: Unproblematized reflection, problematized reflection and critically problematized reflection. This study built upon Genor’s (2005) framework. The researchers of this current study taught English as a second language (ESL) coursework over two semesters to inservice educators. Analysis of participants’ course documents and instructional artifacts revealed factors that contributed to changes in beliefs and professional practices in teaching multilingual students. These factors included teachers’ (1) capacity to identify one’s biases and assumptions, (2) perceived purposes for incorporating students’ native languages and cultures in instruction, (3) levels ...


Depression, Control, And Climate: An Examination Of Factors Impacting Teaching Quality In Preschool Classrooms, Brook E. Sawyer, Lauren M. Cycyk, Lia E. Sandilos, Lisa Lopez, Clancy Blair Apr 2015

Depression, Control, And Climate: An Examination Of Factors Impacting Teaching Quality In Preschool Classrooms, Brook E. Sawyer, Lauren M. Cycyk, Lia E. Sandilos, Lisa Lopez, Clancy Blair

Faculty Publications

This study investigated the relationship of preschool teachers’ self-reported depressive symptomatology, perception of classroom control, and perception of school climate to classroom quality as measured by the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS Pre-K). The sample consisted of 59 urban preschool classrooms serving low-income and linguistically diverse students in the northeastern and southeastern United States. Results of hierarchical linear modeling revealed that teachers’ individual report of depressive symptomatology was significantly and negatively predictive of their observed instructional support and classroom organization quality domains. The findings of this study have implications for increasing access to mental health supports for teachers in an ...


Traveling Trunks: Enrich Curriculum With A Global Perspective, Nancy Shepherd Apr 2015

Traveling Trunks: Enrich Curriculum With A Global Perspective, Nancy Shepherd

Faculty Publications

Traveling trunks as a delivery method for curricula have been associated with experiential learning and shown to increase learning (George, 2010; Shepherd, 2007; Lett, 1993). Students learn through real-life experiences, such as global social issues (Kister, 1992), and principal to the nature of learning is the relationship between experience and learning, a shaping force in the development of thoughtful, curious students (Loughran, 2006).

The embedded mixed method study showed learning gains occurred when experiential curriculum was facilitated by experienced teachers, and delivered in a traveling trunk. The study (N=58) showed that active learning about social issues engages students. Paired ...


The Aims Of Adventist Education: A Historical Perspective, George R. Knight Apr 2015

The Aims Of Adventist Education: A Historical Perspective, George R. Knight

Faculty Publications

Why operate Adventist schools?

The Adventist pioneers clearly believed their schools were to preach the third angel’s message and do the work of the church. According to Ellen White, the ultimate educational aim is “service.”

But being able to serve implies training in both the intellectual and moral realms. The early believers generally agreed that (1) character development was crucial, that (2) the common branches of study as well as the arts and sciences were important, and that (3) the biblical worldview must provide the matrix in which Christian understanding takes place.

Thus, although early Adventists largely agreed on ...


Effectively Using Discussion Boards To Engage Students In Introductory Leadership Courses, Deborah N. Smith Apr 2015

Effectively Using Discussion Boards To Engage Students In Introductory Leadership Courses, Deborah N. Smith

Faculty Publications

This article discusses the use of online asynchronous discussion boards as a valuable tool for connecting students to leadership concepts, theories, and models in introductory leadership survey courses. Recommendations are given for designing effective discussion boards that engage students and enhance their learning. Student outcomes include construction on knowledge, relevant connections between course material and personal lives, and critical reflection.


Comparing Interaction And Use Of Space In Traditional And Innovative Classrooms, Laura Gurzynski-Weiss, Avizia Long, Megan Solon Mar 2015

Comparing Interaction And Use Of Space In Traditional And Innovative Classrooms, Laura Gurzynski-Weiss, Avizia Long, Megan Solon

Faculty Publications

Despite myriad changes to language teaching methods over time, university-level classroom spaces have largely remained the same—until now. Recent innovations in classroom space design center on technological advances, include movable furniture and coffee-shop style rooms, and are believed to facilitate language learning in several ways. Specifically, compared to traditional classrooms, innovative spaces are designed in the hope of decreasing pre-task set up, increasing student-centered interaction, and facilitating collaborative work with multiple partners—features believed to be important for classroom learning. However, whether or not such features are present in these innovative spaces, or more so than in traditional classrooms ...


The Soliya Connect Program: Two Institutions’ Experience With Virtual Intercultural, Steven Elliott-Gower, Kenneth W. Hill Mar 2015

The Soliya Connect Program: Two Institutions’ Experience With Virtual Intercultural, Steven Elliott-Gower, Kenneth W. Hill

Faculty Publications

In 2012, Georgia College and Kennesaw State University partnered with Soliya, a Washington, DC-based non-profit organization, to bring their students a unique international education experience: the opportunity to engage “virtually” in dialogue, via video-conferencing technology, with students around the world about Islam and the relationship between Western countries and Muslim-majority countries. In this article, the authors compare their respective approaches, examining course objectives, student learning outcomes, course structure, students’ experience with Soliya, and student learning outcomes assessment. The authors conclude with some observations about Soliya and, by implication, other virtual international education experiences as alternatives and/or complements to traditional ...


Equitable Education Of English Learners In The Common Core Age: Implications For Principal Leadership, David Whitenack Mar 2015

Equitable Education Of English Learners In The Common Core Age: Implications For Principal Leadership, David Whitenack

Faculty Publications

This paper highlights the importance of school principals in English Learners’ academic achievement in the age of the Common Core State Standards. Revising the curriculum of administrator preparation programs to include a greater emphasis on curriculum and instruction is one approach to enhancing principal leadership for English Leaners. Another approach is to reculture site-level instructional leadership through professional development to address the academic learning needs of English Learners.


Preparing Students To Be Ethical Decision Makers, Sheila Strider, Lazo Alexandre Feb 2015

Preparing Students To Be Ethical Decision Makers, Sheila Strider, Lazo Alexandre

Faculty Publications

ethics, academia, corporate social responsibility, decision making, leadership, stakeholder interest, financial misconduct.


Small Schools: How Effective Are The Academics?, Jerome Thayer, Martha Havens, Elissa Kido Feb 2015

Small Schools: How Effective Are The Academics?, Jerome Thayer, Martha Havens, Elissa Kido

Faculty Publications

The North American Division’s 2013 school-opening report showed that out of 838 K-12 Seventh- day Adventist schools, 490 (58.5 percent) are small schools, with only one, two, or three teachers, multigrade classrooms, and no fulltime principal. Even in schools with four or more teachers, it is common to find multigrade classrooms.

Can small schools with multigrade classrooms be as effective in fostering achievement as larger schools with single- grade classrooms? This is a concern of many parents who are considering sending their children to the small local Adventist school. To illustrate two points of view related to small ...


A Review Of Motivation And Foreign Language Learning: From Theory To Practice, Avizia Long Jan 2015

A Review Of Motivation And Foreign Language Learning: From Theory To Practice, Avizia Long

Faculty Publications

A review of Motivation and foreign language learning: From theory to practice, by David Lasagabaster, Aintzane Doiz, and Juan Manuel Sierra (Eds.). Amsterdam, the Netherlands: Benjamins, 2014. Pp. viii + 190.


Sustainable Science And Education In The Neoliberal Ecoprison, Peter C. Little Jan 2015

Sustainable Science And Education In The Neoliberal Ecoprison, Peter C. Little

Faculty Publications

As part of the general ‘greening’ of prisons in the last decade of neoliberalization and the formation of institutionalized programs to provide science and environmental education opportunities for the incarcerated, the Sustainability in Prisons Project (SPP), a partnership between Evergreen State College and the Washington State Department of Corrections, has become the most vibrant partnership in the US to mesh the cultures and institutions of environmental science and corrections. Drawing attention to the SPP’s anchoring mission, which is ‘to bring science and nature into prisons,’ this article looks at environmental science education in the contemporary prison in light of ...