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2006

Curriculum and Instruction

Extension publication

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Education

G06-1622 Soybean Inoculation: Applying The Facts To Your Fields (Part Two Of A Two-Part Series), Lori J. Abendroth, Roger Wesley Elmore, Richard B. Ferguson Jan 2006

G06-1622 Soybean Inoculation: Applying The Facts To Your Fields (Part Two Of A Two-Part Series), Lori J. Abendroth, Roger Wesley Elmore, Richard B. Ferguson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Why is it that we see soybean yield responses from inoculating with Bradyrhizobia japonicum in some cases but not others?

This publication explains how to distinguish which fields will likely respond to inoculation with B. japonicum from those that will not. Fields are designated as either "new" or "old" based on how often soybean is grown. This designation is one criterion among many in deciding when to inoculate. In general, research trials across multiple locations in Nebraska have shown no yield advantage to re-inoculation.


G06-1621 Soybean Inoculation: Understanding The Soil And Plant Mechanisms Involved (Part One Of A Two-Part Series), Lori J. Abendroth, Roger Wesley Elmore, Richard B. Ferguson Jan 2006

G06-1621 Soybean Inoculation: Understanding The Soil And Plant Mechanisms Involved (Part One Of A Two-Part Series), Lori J. Abendroth, Roger Wesley Elmore, Richard B. Ferguson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Nitrogen gas (N2) comprises nearly 80 percent of total atmospheric gases, yet most organisms are unable to use N2 as a source of nitrogen. Legumes, such as soybean, are able to capture atmospheric nitrogen and utilize it through the process of nitrogen fixation. This NebGuide is part one of a two-part series on soybean inoculation. Here, we will investigate how soybean inoculation occurs and which environmental conditions impact nitrogen fixation.


G06-806 Chinch Bug Management, Robert J. Wright, Barbara P. Ogg, Stephen D. Danielson Jan 2006

G06-806 Chinch Bug Management, Robert J. Wright, Barbara P. Ogg, Stephen D. Danielson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The life cycle and control of the chinch bug is discussed with descriptions of possible management options in the 2006 NebGuide.


G06-1634 Stevia, Georgia Jones Jan 2006

G06-1634 Stevia, Georgia Jones

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The leaves of one species of stevia plants have naturally occurring sweetness. This 2006 NebGuide discusses the advantages and disadvantages of using stevia, also known as sweet leaf, as a sugar substitute.


Ec06-783 Watermark Granular Matrix Sensor To Measure Soil Matric Potential For Irrigation Management, Suat Irmak, Jose O. Payero, Dean E. Eisenhauer, William L. Kranz, Derrel Martin, Gary L. Zoubek, Jennifer M. Rees, Brandy Vandewalle, Andrew P. Christiansen, Dan Leininger Jan 2006

Ec06-783 Watermark Granular Matrix Sensor To Measure Soil Matric Potential For Irrigation Management, Suat Irmak, Jose O. Payero, Dean E. Eisenhauer, William L. Kranz, Derrel Martin, Gary L. Zoubek, Jennifer M. Rees, Brandy Vandewalle, Andrew P. Christiansen, Dan Leininger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This 2006 Extension Circular defines soil matric potential and describes principles and operational characteristics of one of the electrical resistance type soil moisture sensors for irrigation management. Examples show how soil matric potential can be used for irrigation management.