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2002

Extension publications

Articles 1 - 17 of 17

Full-Text Articles in Education

Ec02-219 Nebraska Swine Report, Duane Reese Jan 2002

Ec02-219 Nebraska Swine Report, Duane Reese

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The 2002 Nebraska Swine Report was prepared by the staff in Animal Science and cooperating Departments for use in Extension, Teaching and Research programs. This publications deals with research on swine reproduction, breeding, health, nutrition, economics, and housing.


Ec02-173 Spotted And Diffuse Knapweed, Neil L. Heckman, Ryan M. Goss, Roch E. Gaussoin, Stevan Z. Knezevic, John L. Lindquist Jan 2002

Ec02-173 Spotted And Diffuse Knapweed, Neil L. Heckman, Ryan M. Goss, Roch E. Gaussoin, Stevan Z. Knezevic, John L. Lindquist

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Spotted knapweed (Centaure amaculosa Lam. = C. biebersteinii DC.) and diffuse knapweed (C.diffusa Lam.) are two of Nebraska’s seven noxious weeds. They are also noxious in at least 17 other states. These are closely related species that are well adapted to a variety of habitats including open forests, rangelands and pastures, Conservation Reserve Program lands, roadsides, and ditch banks. Centaurea is a large genus of over 400 species, 32 of which are common weeds of the United States and several of which [e.g., yellowstar thistle, C. solstitalis L, and Russian knapweed, C. repens L. =Acroptilon repens (L.) DC ...


Ec02-172 Plumeless Thistle, Kara L. Hilgenfeld, Alex Martin Jan 2002

Ec02-172 Plumeless Thistle, Kara L. Hilgenfeld, Alex Martin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Plumeless thistle (Carduus acanthoides L.) is one of seven noxious weeds in Nebraska. An introduced invasive broadleaf weed native to Europe and Asia, plumeless thistle currently infests about 65,000 acres in Nebraska. Infestations of plumeless thistle may reduce productivity of pastures and rangeland, where infestations tend to be the largest. Plumeless thistle competes with and suppresses growth of desirable species. Heavy infestations prevent livestock from grazing the area and lighter infestations prevent livestock from eating plants growing near the thistle. Estimates place the annual loss in Nebraska agricultural production due to plumeless thistle at $162,000. Although plumeless thistle ...


Ec02-171 Canada Thistle, Robert G. Wilson Jan 2002

Ec02-171 Canada Thistle, Robert G. Wilson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Canada thistle [Cirsium arvense (L) Scop.] is one of the seven species defined by Nebraska law as a noxious weed. At least 35 other states also have determined by law that Canada thistle poses a threat to the economic, social, and aesthetic well-being of the residents of their state. Canada thistle is probably the most widespread of all the thistle species and many land managers consider it the most difficult thistle to control. In Nebraska, Canada thistle is estimated to infest 460,000 acres.


Ec02-177 Purple Loosestrife, Stevan Z. Knezevic Jan 2002

Ec02-177 Purple Loosestrife, Stevan Z. Knezevic

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) is an introduced invasive weed that isover running thousands of acres of wetlands and waterways in the Midwest. Once purple loosestrife invades a wetland, natural habitat is lost and the productivity of native plant and animal communities is severely reduced. These losses in turn interfere with various levels of the ecosystem and area recreational activities such as fishing, boating and hunting, diminishing revenue from tourism and impairing the social and economic well being of local communities. A single control measure cannot provide long-term, sustainable control of this weed. An integrated approach, using a variety of mechanical ...


Ec02-176 Musk Thistle, Fred Roeth, Steven R. Melvin, Irvin L. Schleufer Jan 2002

Ec02-176 Musk Thistle, Fred Roeth, Steven R. Melvin, Irvin L. Schleufer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Musk thistle (Carduus nutans L.) is an introduced invasive broadleaf weed native to Europe, North Africa, and Asia. In these areas it is a minor weed because natural enemies keep its population low. When the plant was introduced into North America, its natural enemies were left behind. Without these natural checks, the thistle is able to thrive and compete with native vegetation.

Musk thistles aggressively invade all lands in Nebraska. Typical cropland weed control methods are very effective against them; however, land with permanent cover (pasture, range, roadway ditches and wasteland) that is not tilled or treated with a herbicide ...


Ec02-174 Leafy Spurge, Robert A. Masters, Brady F. Kappler Jan 2002

Ec02-174 Leafy Spurge, Robert A. Masters, Brady F. Kappler

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Leafy spurge is an invasive weed that infests over three million acres in the northern Great Plains and the prairie provinces of Canada. It is commonly found in rangelands, pastures, roadsides, rights-of-way, and woodlands. Leafy spurge can reduce rangeland and pasture carrying capacity by as much as 75 percent because it competes with forages and cattle avoid grazing areas infested with this weed. In North Dakota where leafy spurge infests about 900,000 acres, estimates of direct and indirect losses exceed $100 million each year. In Nebraska, the direct loss in forage value attributed to leafy spurge has been estimated ...


Nf02-551 Management Of Blister Beetles In Alfalfa, John B. Campbell, Steve Ensley Jan 2002

Nf02-551 Management Of Blister Beetles In Alfalfa, John B. Campbell, Steve Ensley

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Adult blister beetles (Epicauta spp.) tend to be gregarious, and several may be observed feeding on the same flowering plant such as alfalfa or sometimes soybeans, goldenrod or occasionally musk thistle, They feed primarily on leaves and flowers but do little damage to crops.

This NebFact discusses the life cycle, damage, treatment, and prevention avoidance of the blister beetle here in Nebraska.


Nf02-561 Management Program For Common Root Rot And Fusarium Foot Rot (Crown Rot) (Revised September 2005), John E. Watkins Jan 2002

Nf02-561 Management Program For Common Root Rot And Fusarium Foot Rot (Crown Rot) (Revised September 2005), John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact, the Wheat Disease Fact Sheet No. 3 of a series, discusses the cause and occurrence, key symptoms, cultural management practices, fungicide programs, and applications for controlling common root rot and fusarium foot rot (crown rot) of wheat.


Cc02-428 Achieving Success With A Business Plan: Case Study Of A Diversified Farm Business Plan, Jody Wichmann, Thomas Dorn, H. Douglas Jose Jan 2002

Cc02-428 Achieving Success With A Business Plan: Case Study Of A Diversified Farm Business Plan, Jody Wichmann, Thomas Dorn, H. Douglas Jose

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication is a case study of a diversified farm business plan. It covers the business organization; history and overview of operation; operation layout; mission statement and goals; strategic outlook; present business, legal and contractual situation; production, financial marketing, and personnel situations; job description, salary, benefits and labor training; and personnel summary.


Cc02-426 Achieving Success With A Business Plan: Case Study Of A Cow/Calf Business Plan, Jody Wichmann, John Hanson, H. Douglas Jose Jan 2002

Cc02-426 Achieving Success With A Business Plan: Case Study Of A Cow/Calf Business Plan, Jody Wichmann, John Hanson, H. Douglas Jose

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication is a case study of a cow/calf business plan. It covers the business organization; history and overview of the operation; the operation layout; mission statement and goals; present business, legal and contractual situations; production, financial, marketing and personnel situations; job description, salary, benefits and labor training; and personnel summary.


Cc02-424 Achieving Success With A Business Plan: Case Study To Prepare A Grain Farm Business Plan, Jody Wichmann, John Hanson, Thomas Dorn, H. Douglas Jose Jan 2002

Cc02-424 Achieving Success With A Business Plan: Case Study To Prepare A Grain Farm Business Plan, Jody Wichmann, John Hanson, Thomas Dorn, H. Douglas Jose

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication is a case study on how to prepare a grain farm business plan. It covers the history and overview of the farming operation; the layout, mission statement and goals; strategic outlook; production situation and summary; financial situation and summary; marketing situation and plan; current personnel situation; job description, salary and benefits; labor and training goals; and personnel summary.


Ec02-174 Noxious Weeds Of Nebraska: Leafy Spurge, Robert A. Masters, Brady Kappler Jan 2002

Ec02-174 Noxious Weeds Of Nebraska: Leafy Spurge, Robert A. Masters, Brady Kappler

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Leafy spurge is an invasive weed that infests over three million acres in the northern Great Plains and the prairie provinces of Canada. It is commonly found in rangelands, pastures, roadsides, rights-of-way, and woodlands. Leafy spurge can reduce rangeland and pasture carrying capacity by as much as 75 percent because it competes with forages and cattle avoid grazing areas infested with this weed.

This Extension Circular discusses the biology, identification, distribution and control of leafy spurge.


G02-1465 Crop Water Use In Western Nebraska, C. Dean Yonts Jan 2002

G02-1465 Crop Water Use In Western Nebraska, C. Dean Yonts

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Whether your water originates from the ground or the river, water for irrigation is becoming limited due to diminishing supplies and increasing environmental needs. In many areas of the Nebraska Panhandle, groundwater levels are dropping due to over development of the aquifers. In river valleys, water shortages occur during periods of drought.

This NebGuide provides information on average weekly crop water use values for the major crops grown in western Nebraska. The information is best used for planning decisions before the season begins or for long term irrigation system planning.


G02-1476 Prairie Dogs And Their Control, Scott E. Hygnstrom, Dallas Virchow, John Hobbs Jan 2002

G02-1476 Prairie Dogs And Their Control, Scott E. Hygnstrom, Dallas Virchow, John Hobbs

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Black-tailed prairie dogs are stocky, burrowing rodents that are members of the squirrel family. They are the only species of prairie dog native to Nebraska and they live across the western three-fourths of the state. They cause problems, however, when they conflict with livestock ranching and other land uses, or cause a threat to human health and safety.

This NebGuide provides information on the life history and legal status of black-tailed prairie dogs and prevention and control of the damage they can cause.


Nf02-507 Manure Testing: What To Request?, Charles A. Shapiro, Charles S. Wortmann, Richard Deloughery Jan 2002

Nf02-507 Manure Testing: What To Request?, Charles A. Shapiro, Charles S. Wortmann, Richard Deloughery

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Manure testing is necessary to make optimum use of manure while protecting water resources. The tests most frequently needed to optimize nutrient management are total and ammonium nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, pH, soluble salts, sodium, and dry matter content. This NebFact is a guide to providing information on a Manure Sample Sub­mission Form for reliable interpretation of results.


G02-1482 Guidelines For A Non-Fasting Feeding Program For The Molting Of Laying Hens, Sheila E. Scheideler, Mary M. Beck Jan 2002

G02-1482 Guidelines For A Non-Fasting Feeding Program For The Molting Of Laying Hens, Sheila E. Scheideler, Mary M. Beck

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Laying hens are molted at the end of one laying cycle (i.e. one year) to induce a cessation of lay and rejuvenation of the reproductive tract and skeleton for a second cycle of egg production. This is based on the natural molting process that wild birds undergo annually and traditionally it has been induced by fasting the hens for a short period of time. This NebGuide offers guidance on non-fasting feeding program for the molting of laying hens.