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Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2002

Science and Mathematics Education

Carroll College

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Education

Exploring The Natural Connection Of Mathematical And Musical Concepts Using Mathematica, Joe Hayter, Sarah Cobb Apr 2002

Exploring The Natural Connection Of Mathematical And Musical Concepts Using Mathematica, Joe Hayter, Sarah Cobb

Mathematics, Engineering and Computer Science Undergraduate Theses

Math and music share one very common property; they are both universal languages of the world. Their scientific relationship represents another powerful tie. The harmonious, unique, and enjoyable tunes we hear are surrounded by scientific and mathematical concepts that make music possible. Exploring this natural connection between math and music allows for a more complete understanding of both these subjects. By analyzing the formulas used to create musical notes, examining how to apply matrices to music, and implementing an inter-disciplinary unit of math and music into the classroom, the reader of this thesis will discover the multitude of similarities that ...


Mathematica Outside The Lab: Transferring Classroom Material Onto The World Wide Web, Rebecca Baker Apr 2002

Mathematica Outside The Lab: Transferring Classroom Material Onto The World Wide Web, Rebecca Baker

Mathematics, Engineering and Computer Science Undergraduate Theses

The Internet has greatly expanded over the last decade, yet there are few options for people wishing to create interactive Web pages that can perform computations and neatly format mathematical expressions. Many educators wish to make classroom labs and exercises available online, without hindering students with more code than necessary. In addition to educators, many companies (such as Analytic Cycling) have a need to include interactive calculators on their Web pages. However, current mathematical tools are lacking in one or more areas. Common problems with current mathematical tools include the following: • Verbose and non-intuitive code • Lack of supporting software • Little ...