Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

1991

Nebraska

Articles 1 - 13 of 13

Full-Text Articles in Education

Ec91-123 Drought Management On Range And Pastureland: A Handbook For Nebraska And South Dakota, Patrick E. Reece, Jack D. Alexander, James R. Johnson Jan 1991

Ec91-123 Drought Management On Range And Pastureland: A Handbook For Nebraska And South Dakota, Patrick E. Reece, Jack D. Alexander, James R. Johnson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Drought is generally defined as a prolonged period during which annual precipitation is less than 75 percent of average. Based upon this definition, drought has occurred in 21 percent of the years in the northern Great Plains since 1940. Poor distribution of precipitation in a single year or less than average precipitation in successive years can also cause drought conditions.

This extension circulation discusses the following: how plants respond to drought, management preparation for drought, herd management, animal response to drought, predicting forage production and stocking rates, drought management plans, rangeland resource inventory, grazing management, and plant recovery after drought.


Ec91-1773 Deer Damage Control In Nebraska, Scott E. Hygnstrom, Bill Baxter Jan 1991

Ec91-1773 Deer Damage Control In Nebraska, Scott E. Hygnstrom, Bill Baxter

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Nebraskans are fortunate to have two species of deer in the state — the white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and the mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). They are beautiful and fascinating animals that provide many aesthetic and recreational benefits. They can however, cause problems when they damage agricultural crops, trees and backyard plantings.

This extension circular covers the methods of reducing deer damage through herd management (legal harvest, shooting permits, and live removal), deer fencing, repellents, and scare devices.


G91-1028 Preparing Fabric For Use, Rose Marie Tondl Jan 1991

G91-1028 Preparing Fabric For Use, Rose Marie Tondl

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Grain perfection is the goal for people who sew.

Smart styling and a professional look in clothing construction require correct use of the grain of the fabric. No formula or method can conceal a poorly cut garment.

Garment pieces cut or pulled off grain will not fit correctly and will hang poorly when worn. Whether simple or elaborate in design, the fabric shows whether or not it has been cut on the exact grain.


G91-1039 Respiratory Infections In Domestic Poultry Flocks, Eva Wallner-Pendleton, Dale Webb Jan 1991

G91-1039 Respiratory Infections In Domestic Poultry Flocks, Eva Wallner-Pendleton, Dale Webb

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the most common respiratory infections in poultry, and includes steps to diagnose, prevent, and treat each.

Small poultry flocks are susceptible to a number of respiratory infections. Some of these produce extremely mild illness while others may result in a high number of deaths.

Regardless of whether birds are raised for meat, eggs, breeding or show purposes, respiratory infections result in decreased performance. They may also disqualify a bird for show, and pose disease hazards for other poultry on the same premises.


G91-1043 Water Runoff Control Practices For Sprinkler Irrigation Systems, William L. Kranz, David P. Shelton, Elbert C. Dickey, John A. Smith Jan 1991

G91-1043 Water Runoff Control Practices For Sprinkler Irrigation Systems, William L. Kranz, David P. Shelton, Elbert C. Dickey, John A. Smith

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes techniques to help reduce water runoff from fields irrigationd with sprinkler irrigation systems.

Water runoff is often a problem associated with sprinkler irrigation systems operated on sloping terrain. Soil particles, fertilizers and pesticides can become part of runoff waters and can be moved from their target locations, causing degradation of surface water quality.

Other potential problems associated with runoff include a lack of soil moisture in localized areas of the field, crop nutrient deficiencies, washed-out seeds or plants, and increased irrigation water pumping costs.


Ec91-1771 Windbreaks And Wildlife, Ron J. Johnson, James R. Brandle, Mary M. Beck Jan 1991

Ec91-1771 Windbreaks And Wildlife, Ron J. Johnson, James R. Brandle, Mary M. Beck

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Windbreaks can support wildlife that add beauty and pleasure to our lives. They also sustain birds that eat insect pests, improve hunting opportunities, and provide a focal point for family outdoor activities. The world around us would be less appealing without the stimulation--the color, sounds, tracks, and mystery--of wild creatures; windbreaks help wildlife and in some areas are essential to survival of the wildlife we enjoy. You can add wildlife benefits to windbreak plantings whether your main goal is to shelter crops, livestock, roads, or a home or farmstead. This publication provides an overview of windbreaks and wildlife, and gives ...


G91-1036 Environmental Stresses And Tree Health, Jon S. Wilson, Mark O. Harrell Jan 1991

G91-1036 Environmental Stresses And Tree Health, Jon S. Wilson, Mark O. Harrell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide is intended to help tree owners identify tree health problems caused by environmental factors, and ways to prevent or reduce damage.

Environmental stresses cause many health problems of Nebraska trees. Hot and cold temperatures, drying winds, poor soil and root conditions and man's activities can cause direct damage to leaves, bark and roots, and can predispose trees to secondary insect and disease attack. Maintaining a tree in good condition through proper maintenance can prevent many environmentally related health problems.


G91-1035 Tree Injuries -- Prevention And Care (Revised July 2002), Dave Mooter, Mike Kuhns Jan 1991

G91-1035 Tree Injuries -- Prevention And Care (Revised July 2002), Dave Mooter, Mike Kuhns

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

It takes proper care and maintenance to keep trees healthy and safe. This is a guide toward that objective.

It has been said that a tree is not planted until it has been in the ground five years. This is especially true in Nebraska, where trees are sometimes difficult to grow.


Nf91-30 The Clover Leaf Weevil In Alfalfa, Keith J. Jarvi, Stephen D. Danielson Jan 1991

Nf91-30 The Clover Leaf Weevil In Alfalfa, Keith J. Jarvi, Stephen D. Danielson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

In 1991, there has been a lot of concern about the clover leaf weevil in alfalfa in eastern Nebraska. Many farmers in the eastern one-third of the state experienced problems with the regrowth of alfalfa after the first cutting in 1990, caused by the feeding of the adult of this insect. This NebFact discusses the difference between the alfalfa weevil and the clover leaf weevil and to control them in the field(s).


G91-1000 Guidelines For Soil Sampling, Richard B. Ferguson, K.D. Frank, Gary W. Hergert, Edwin J. Penas, Richard A. Wiese Jan 1991

G91-1000 Guidelines For Soil Sampling, Richard B. Ferguson, K.D. Frank, Gary W. Hergert, Edwin J. Penas, Richard A. Wiese

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Soil test values are no better than the soil samples you collect. Proper soil sampling procedures must be followed to obtain meaningful test results for fertilizer decisions.

The best guideline for determining fertilizer needs is a reliable analysis of a soil sample that is representative of the field. Proper procedures must be followed to collect representative soil samples.


Ec91-1556 Subterranean Termites And Their Control, Shripat T. Kamble Jan 1991

Ec91-1556 Subterranean Termites And Their Control, Shripat T. Kamble

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Termite damage to residential and commercial buildings in the U.S. costs more than $1 billion annually. Subterranean termites, the most destructive of all termite species, account for 95% of the damage. Subterranean termites occur in every state except Alaska. Two subterranean termite species, Reticulitermes flavipes (Kollar) and R. tibialis Banks, are found in Nebraska. Control of these termites costs more than $1 million each year.


Ec91-1767 Windbreaks For Rural Living, James R. Brandle, Teresa K. Boes, Bruce Wight Jan 1991

Ec91-1767 Windbreaks For Rural Living, James R. Brandle, Teresa K. Boes, Bruce Wight

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

In many parts of the United States, the constant force of the wind exaggerates daily weather conditions and can make living in these areas seem unbearable. A well-designed windbreak around the home, ranch, or farmstead slows the wind and improves the overall environment. Farm and ranch windbreaks conserve energy, provide snow control, improve working and recreational environments, enhance wildlife populations, provide visual screening and dust control, and increase the production of various wood and food products.

Ranch and farmstead windbreaks provide the greatest benefits in areas with high winds, large amounts of snow, extreme temperature fluctuations, or minimal natural forest ...


Ec91-1764 Windbreak Establishment, James R. Brandle, Patricia Boehner, Sherman Finch Jan 1991

Ec91-1764 Windbreak Establishment, James R. Brandle, Patricia Boehner, Sherman Finch

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

successful windbreak planting depends on proper establishment and care during the first few years after planting. Time spent in site preparation, weed control, and replanting is repaid many times during the lifetime of the windbreak. Take no shortcuts in the planning and establishment of your windbreak.

Windbreaks are investments in the future value of your property. Each windbreak system is unique and your windbreak should be designed for your site and objectives. Your local conservation office can provide help in designing and installing your windbreak. These organizations can also help with recommendations on where to buy planting stock and how ...