Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Education

Foreward And Preface To Courier, Volume Xxvi, Number 2, Fall 1991, Mary Beth Hinton, Alexander N. Charters Oct 1991

Foreward And Preface To Courier, Volume Xxvi, Number 2, Fall 1991, Mary Beth Hinton, Alexander N. Charters

The Courier

IT WAS THE experiences of World War II that made me, along with others, realize that if peace were to be maintained we would need a more enlightened citizenry, more people qualified in the occupations and professions, and more understanding of the international scene. During the war it had become apparent that adults, under great pressure and in short periods of time, could learn how to rivet (Rosie the Riveter!), how to speak new languages, how to operate the machines of war, and how to become leaders. Clearly, adult men and women could learn 'new tricks'. They could acquire the ...


The Adult And Continuing Education Collections At Syracuse University, Terrance Keenan Oct 1991

The Adult And Continuing Education Collections At Syracuse University, Terrance Keenan

The Courier

Since 1949 Syracuse University has assembled historical documents, including manuscript, print, visual, and media materials, related to adult education. The Adult and Continuing Education Collections, housed in the George Arents Research Library, now form one of the world's largest compilations of English-language materials in this field. They occupy 900 feet of shelf space and contain more than 50 groups of personal papers and records of organizations, all of which reveal much about the development of adult education as a field of study and as a practice in such areas as literacy and civic education.

These papers document efforts to ...


Laubach In India: 1935 To 1970, S. Y. Shah Oct 1991

Laubach In India: 1935 To 1970, S. Y. Shah

The Courier

Dr. Frank C. Laubach, missionary and adult educator, dedicated his life to the cause of literacy for development and world peace. During his travels to 103 countries, he worked toward helping some 60 to 100 million people become literate. In addition, he founded or helped found four literacy organizations, including Laubach Literacy International; wrote forty books on adult education, Christian religion, world politics, and culture; and co-authored literacy primers in more than 300 languages. He was awarded four honorary doctorates—one of them from Syracuse University.

Although Laubach worked in many other countries, it is said that his heart was ...