Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

1964

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

Articles 1 - 30 of 34

Full-Text Articles in Education

Reading, Understanding, And Poverty, Homer L.J. Carter Oct 1964

Reading, Understanding, And Poverty, Homer L.J. Carter

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

A letter from the editor.


A Precious Legacy, Louise J. Walker Oct 1964

A Precious Legacy, Louise J. Walker

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

One of the blessings of my childhood was the utter freedom in which I was left to explore, sample, and lose myself in books. Almost as soon as I could handle a book, my parents taught me how to open and use one properly. Books have become a part of me. I would be lost without them. They are a way of life for me. I wish this same freedom for all children today!


Little Things Can Make Reading Easier, Louis Foley Oct 1964

Little Things Can Make Reading Easier, Louis Foley

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

In recent years, specialists in linguistics have become increasingly aware of a fundamental reason for poor reading. That is the reading of words one by one, instead of promptly recognizing their grouping, the patterns in which they are joined, or in other words sentence structure. The way a person reads orally seems to be a reliable indication of how he reads silently, for as a leading authority has remarked, "it is not likely that a word-caller in oral reading will read silently by language structures."* so it should be easy to determine in any case whether this basic fault is ...


Ten Second Reviews, Blanche O. Bush Oct 1964

Ten Second Reviews, Blanche O. Bush

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

No abstract available.


Ah, Wilderness, George Egland Oct 1964

Ah, Wilderness, George Egland

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

In the movement toward greater and greater specialization which is so popular these days, we can find growing tendencies for the members of new branch-professions to operate in ways which dis courage interprofessional cooperation. In much the same way as adolescents strive to establish distinct and secure self-images, so the various branches of the educational profession are seeking separate identity and status, and they are choosing routes which remove them as far as possible from their neighbors. This exclusiveness is pointed up dramatically by the very labels and distinguishing lingo which the new specialties are adopting.


Did You See? Oct 1964

Did You See?

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

White Squaw? It is a fascinating true story of Jennie Wiley who was captured by Indians many years ago and with tremendous odds against her, finally escaped and returned to her own people. White Squaw is written by Arville Wheeler of George Peabody College for Teachers and is published by Eastern Kentucky Publishers, Inc., 76 Main Street, Paintsville, Kentucky.


Round Robin, Dorothy E. Smith Oct 1964

Round Robin, Dorothy E. Smith

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

Letters to the editor.


Challenging The Curious Mind, Dena Heynen Oct 1964

Challenging The Curious Mind, Dena Heynen

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

Is the education you are providing for your students real? Is it effective? Is it challenging the curious mind? There is a great concern today about what is happening in our schools and about how the youth of today will face the future of tomorrow.


Reading Horizons Vol. 5, No. 1 Oct 1964

Reading Horizons Vol. 5, No. 1

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

Complete issue of Reading Horizons volume 5, issue 1.


Reading Horizons Vol. 4, No. 4 Jul 1964

Reading Horizons Vol. 4, No. 4

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

Complete issue of Reading Horizons volume 4, issue 4.


Did You See? Jul 1964

Did You See?

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

The thought-provoking article by Albert J. Kingston which appears in the spring, 1964, issue of the Journal of Developmental Reading? It is entitled, "What Do We Mean by Reading in the Content Areas?"


"Look, Ma, He's Reading", Pauline Lucas Jul 1964

"Look, Ma, He's Reading", Pauline Lucas

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

You learn to swim by swimming. You learn to sing by singing. You learn to drive a car by driving. The same truth holds for reading; you learn to read by reading, to really read that is, not merely to pronounce words. Why, then, don't we as teachers spend more time and effort leading children to the joys and habits of reading—volunteer reading for fun, for recreation, for sheer enjoyment?


Ten Second Reviews, Blanche O. Bush Jul 1964

Ten Second Reviews, Blanche O. Bush

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

No abstract available.


Round Robin, Dorothy E. Smith Jul 1964

Round Robin, Dorothy E. Smith

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

Letters to the editor.


Have Good Readers--Will Go Places, Joan Paul Jul 1964

Have Good Readers--Will Go Places, Joan Paul

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

John, a well developed fifth grade boy, has been chosen to repre sent his school in an all-city sports contest. Since he is very athletic and has been encouraged by his classmates, he stands a good chance of winning the 100-yard-dash trophy for his school. Sounds exciting, doesn't it? But, wait. What if his teacher tells him to run slowly so the other boys can keep up with him? No teacher would dream of doing that. We do not expect children to run at the same rate, and we encourage them to try to excel.


Editorial Comment, Homer L.J. Carter Jul 1964

Editorial Comment, Homer L.J. Carter

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

A letter from the editor.


Ready Or Not Should They Be Taught, Vern L. Farrow Jul 1964

Ready Or Not Should They Be Taught, Vern L. Farrow

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

One quiet afternoon recently as I was pondering an article advocating early reading instruction, I could hear my children playing hide-and-seek. They were shouting, "Ready or not you shall be caught!" I could not help drawing an analogy between the meaning of their childish rhyme and my feeling toward the growing tempo and insistence of demands to plunge preschool children indiscriminately into formalized reading activities. Unconsciously I paraphrased the rhyme, "Ready or not you SHALL be TAUGHT!" It had an ominous connotation smacking of pursuit, capture, and force and I began considering the problem in earnest.


Tribute, Dorothy J. Mcginnis Jul 1964

Tribute, Dorothy J. Mcginnis

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

A letter by the guest editor in tribute of Homer L.J. Carter, editor of Reading Horizons.

On May 28, 1964, members of the Western Michigan University Chapter of the International Reading Association honored its founder and sponsor by electing to change the name of their organization to the Homer L. J. Carter Reading Council. We chose to honor Mr. Carter at this time because on July 1 he will retire from Western Michigan University where he has been Director of the Psycho-Educational Clinic and Professor of Psychology.


Editorial Comment, Homer L.J. Carter Apr 1964

Editorial Comment, Homer L.J. Carter

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

A letter from the editor.


Round Robin, Dorothy E. Smith Apr 1964

Round Robin, Dorothy E. Smith

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

Letters to the editor.


Did You See Apr 1964

Did You See

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

No abstract available.


Ten Second Reviews, Blanche O. Bush Apr 1964

Ten Second Reviews, Blanche O. Bush

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

No abstract available.


Controversy, G.M. Chronister Apr 1964

Controversy, G.M. Chronister

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

As time passes we seem to roll on from one controversy to another in the area of teaching children to read. We have had and still do have arguments concerning basic reading programs vs. individualized instruction. During the last several years we have accumulated evidence of the operation of both programs. While all are not models of research, they give us a clearer picture than we have had to date.


Challenge Accepted, Linda Shannon Mcconnell Apr 1964

Challenge Accepted, Linda Shannon Mcconnell

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

Have you really evaluated your reading program? Is it possible that you have one set of textbooks in your room, and you think a new approach in teaching reading is out of the question? It is time, right now, to take a good look at what can be done in the teaching of reading.


The Retarded Reader: How Can We Help Him?, Dorothy J. Mcginnis Apr 1964

The Retarded Reader: How Can We Help Him?, Dorothy J. Mcginnis

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

One of the chief concerns of any school system is what to do with the underachiever. This paper discusses one type of underachiever—the retarded reader.


Reading Horizons Vol. 4, No. 3 Apr 1964

Reading Horizons Vol. 4, No. 3

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

Complete issue of Reading Horizons volume 4, issue 3.


Editorial Comment, Homer L.J. Carter Jan 1964

Editorial Comment, Homer L.J. Carter

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

A letter from the editor.


A Study Of Learning Utilizing Visual-Visual And Visual-Auditory Stimuli, Alice Ann Geiger Jan 1964

A Study Of Learning Utilizing Visual-Visual And Visual-Auditory Stimuli, Alice Ann Geiger

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

In a fast moving world, reading ability becomes increasingly more important. Despite television, radio, and movies, reading is still the most important method of broadening our horizons (5, p. 125). To scan the world events and study the particulars requires good reading skills. Again and again the question is asked if the best possible method of reading instruction is being utilized with our boys and girls (1, p. 79 and 4, pp. 169-170). For that matter, we might ask if we adults are making the most of our ability to identify, interpret, and evaluate facts, so that we can intelligently ...


Ten Second Reviews, Blanche O. Bush Jan 1964

Ten Second Reviews, Blanche O. Bush

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

No abstract available.


Did You See Jan 1964

Did You See

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

The article by Dolores Durkin of Teachers College, Columbia University, which presents the results of a longitudinal study of children who learned to read prior to school entrance? You can find it in the December 1963 issue of The Elementary School Journal.