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Series

Cooperative Extension

1973

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Education

G73-12 Iris Borer Control, David L. Keith, Frederick P. Baxendale Jan 1973

G73-12 Iris Borer Control, David L. Keith, Frederick P. Baxendale

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Scouting, prevention and control of the iris borer.

This insect is the most serious insect pest of iris in Nebraska and is found virtually everywhere in the state. Damage is characterized by dark, streaked, or watery areas and ragged edges on the developing leaves of iris in May and June and extensive destruction of the insides of the rhizomes in July and early August. Examination late in summer will reveal a large white to pinkish caterpillar from 1 1/2 to 2 inches long in the rhizome, usually accompanied by a foul-smelling soft rot.


G73-60 Working With Wood I. Home Drying Lumber (Revised July 1987), Michael Kuhns, Richard Straight Jan 1973

G73-60 Working With Wood I. Home Drying Lumber (Revised July 1987), Michael Kuhns, Richard Straight

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Avoid the expense of kiln-dried lumber by processing and drying your own lumber at home.

Anyone who has done much woodworking knows how expensive high quality, kiln-dried, hardwood lumber can be. Even kiln-dried construction lumber is expensive. Besides expense, there also may be problems with finding certain species of wood, highly figured wood, or hardwood boards thicker than one inch (4/4).

One way to avoid these problems is to dry your own lumber. Green, unsurfaced, or unplaned lumber can be obtained from many small sawmills in Nebraska and surrounding states. You may also want to obtain your own logs ...


G73-71 Lettuce (Revised April 1990), R.E. Neild, Roger D. Uhlinger Jan 1973

G73-71 Lettuce (Revised April 1990), R.E. Neild, Roger D. Uhlinger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Successfully growing and harvesting lettuce is the focus of this NebGuide.

Lettuce is an increasingly popular vegetable in the United States. Because it is a basic ingredient in salads, lettuce is eaten more frequently than any other vegetable. Lettuce can be served alone with a variety of dressings or mixed with other fresh vegetables.

Its fresh color and crisp texture serve well as a garnish, and its leaves may be stuffed with fruit, cheese, seafood, poultry, ham, or egg salads. Although usually consumed fresh, leaf lettuce and chopped green onions "wilted" with warm vegetable oil and vinegar make a pleasing ...


G73-46 Hessian Fly On Wheat, John E. Foster, Gary L. Hein Jan 1973

G73-46 Hessian Fly On Wheat, John E. Foster, Gary L. Hein

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the life cycle, control and prevention of the Hessian fly. Plant-safe dates and resistant wheat varieties are also examined.

The Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say), is not native to the United States, but was probably introduced by Hessian soldiers during the Revolutionary War. This insect was given its common name by Americans because of its damage on Long Island in 1779. The pest has become distributed throughout the United States wheat production areas since then.

The Hessian fly belongs to the family of insects known as gall midges (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), a group noted for their habit of ...


G73-4 Bagworms (Revised June 1987), Frederick P. Baxendale Jan 1973

G73-4 Bagworms (Revised June 1987), Frederick P. Baxendale

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Bagworms can damage juniper, arborvitae, pine, and spruce. Description, life history, and control are discussed in this publication.

The bagworm is native to the United States and is found in eastern Nebraska. Bagworms feed on many species of trees and shrubs, but are most common on junipers. They are rarely a serious problem on deciduous trees, except when larvae move away from evergreens.


G73-45 Managing Black Walnut Plantations For Timber (Revised March 1979), Neal E. Jennings, Frank A. Hershey Jan 1973

G73-45 Managing Black Walnut Plantations For Timber (Revised March 1979), Neal E. Jennings, Frank A. Hershey

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

A basic knowledge of tree needs and the application of simple management principles are required to produce quality black walnut timber.

Black walnut (Juglans nigra) is a high value timber species. The only way to maximize profit from black walnut plantations is by good timber management. Management practices that increase growth, improve quality and reduce damage, substantially increase profit. A basic knowledge of tree needs and the application of simple management principles are required to produce quality black walnut timber.

Protection, pruning and thinning are the major management activities.


G73-73 Sweet Potatoes (Revised June 1992), R.E. Neild, Laurie Hodges Jan 1973

G73-73 Sweet Potatoes (Revised June 1992), R.E. Neild, Laurie Hodges

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Varieties, requirements and culture, harvesting and storage of sweet potatoes.

The sweet potato, a member of the morning glory plant family, is native to tropical America. It is an important food plant in warmer regions of the world and is adapted to southeastern Nebraska. Sweet potatoes may be boiled, baked, fried, or candied. They have high food value. Varieties with deeply yellow colored roots are a good source of vitamin A.