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1998

Agriculture

Articles 1 - 30 of 42

Full-Text Articles in Education

G98-1376 Drinking Water: Fluoride (Revised February 2005), Sharon Skipton, Bruce I. Dvorak Jan 1998

G98-1376 Drinking Water: Fluoride (Revised February 2005), Sharon Skipton, Bruce I. Dvorak

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses fluoride in domestic water supplies. Fluoride, a naturally occurring element, exists in combination with other elements as a fluoride compound and is found as a constituent of minerals in rocks and soil. When water passes through and over the soil and rock formations containing fluoride it dissolves these compounds, resulting in the small amounts of soluble fluoride present in virtually all water sources.


G98-1355 Cropshare Leasing Patterns In Nebraska - 1996, Bruce B. Johnson, H. Douglas Jose, John D. Cole Jan 1998

G98-1355 Cropshare Leasing Patterns In Nebraska - 1996, Bruce B. Johnson, H. Douglas Jose, John D. Cole

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Leasing agricultural land is very common in Nebraska. This NebGuide discusses the most common leasing arrangements in the state in 1996.

Nearly half, 47 percent, of Nebraska's agricultural land is leased each year; and of the cropland acreage, cropshare leasing remains the primary leasing arrangement used throughout most of the state. In cropshare arrangements, the landowner and the tenant agree to specific shares of the crop production as well as shares of certain key crop input costs. In principle, the division of the output between the landowner and the tenant should reflect the relative level of contributions of inputs ...


Ec98-753 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Fact Sheet 7: Improving Hazardous Materials And Waste Management, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-753 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Fact Sheet 7: Improving Hazardous Materials And Waste Management, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Waste is inevitable. Things which have been outgrown, broken, replaced, or are just no longer needed add to the waste produced at homes, acreages and around farms. Most of the waste accumulated around the farm, acreage and home is solid waste. Solid waste includes all discarded materials — newspapers, empty paint cans, liquids, gases, pickle jars, orange peelings, leftover food, worn out shoes, junk mail — this list is endless. Some of these solid wastes contain potentially hazardous materials.


Ec98-762 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Fact Sheet 6: Improving Petroleum Product Storage, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-762 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Fact Sheet 6: Improving Petroleum Product Storage, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Petroleum product storage is an area of great concern for groundwater safety. It’s not uncommon for fuel to leak into aquifers and pollute the drinking water of a family or even a community, and it can be very costly for the landowner. Petroleum product storage is regulated by laws regarding fire safety and air quality as well. Therefore, petroleum product storage must be evaluated from various perspectives. This factsheet examines some important aspects of petroleum product storage: where the tank is located on your property, the type of tank, how to monitor the tank, reduction of losses from aboveground ...


Ec98-792 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Fact Sheet 16: Improving Crop Pesticide Application Management, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-792 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Fact Sheet 16: Improving Crop Pesticide Application Management, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Though pesticides are especially harmful to the target pest, they are also potentially harmful to most living and breathing creatures and non-target plant life. Proper handling and application management of pesticides are important to protect you and to protect surface and groundwater from contamination. Pesticides were first found in groundwater in the 1970s. Prior to that, the general belief was that pesticides did not leach into the groundwater with normal use.


G96-1362 Soil Temperatures And Spring Planting Dates, Steven J. Meyer, Allen L. Dutcher Jan 1998

G96-1362 Soil Temperatures And Spring Planting Dates, Steven J. Meyer, Allen L. Dutcher

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Dates on which soil temperatures reach a threshold value are presented as a spring planting guide for agronomic and horticultural producers.

For a seed to germinate it must have good contact with the soil and be placed in a favorable soil environment. A good soil environment is one that has suitable soil temperature, adequate soil moisture, good aeration, and for certain seeds, light. Conditions necessary for germination depend on the species and variety of seed being planted. Alone, none of these factors guarantee germination; rather it is the interaction of these factors that affects seed germination.

In Nebraska, soil moisture ...


Nf98-377 Kentucky Bluegrass Seed Production Management In Western Nebraska And Eastern Wyoming, Rebecca L. Harms, David D. Baltensperger, Robert C. Shearman, Dan Laursen, Roger Hammons, Tony Merrigan, Jim Krall, C. Dean Yonts Jan 1998

Nf98-377 Kentucky Bluegrass Seed Production Management In Western Nebraska And Eastern Wyoming, Rebecca L. Harms, David D. Baltensperger, Robert C. Shearman, Dan Laursen, Roger Hammons, Tony Merrigan, Jim Krall, C. Dean Yonts

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses management practicies related to Kentucky Bluegrass seed production.


Nfs-1 Forestry Best Management Practices For Nebraska Jan 1998

Nfs-1 Forestry Best Management Practices For Nebraska

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

A reference guide for loggers, landowners and managers.

Nebraska's Forest Resource

Forests cover 947,000 acres in Nebraska. Other land with scattered tree cover, including narrow wooded strips along streams, windbreaks, and wooded pasture lands, occupy an additional 1,252,000 acres. Managing Nebraska's forest lands can produce significant benefits without negative impacts; however, careless activities in woodlands can damage water resources, soils, wildlife habitat, aesthetic values, and even the ability to produce future benefits.


G98-1358 Feeding To Maximize Protein And Fat, Rick J. Grant Jan 1998

G98-1358 Feeding To Maximize Protein And Fat, Rick J. Grant

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes feeding guidelines to increase milk fat and protein production.

Proper feeding management of dairy herds can both improve the economy of production and provide a healthier cow. To achieve these goals, producers must feed to increase production of milk with maximum levels of milk fat and protein.

Milk solids components include fat, protein, lactose and minerals. Normal values for milk fat range from 3.7 percent (Holstein) to 4.9 percent (Jersey); milk protein ranges from 3.1 percent (Holstein) to 3.8 percent (Jersey). Lactose is usually 4.6–4.8 percent for all breeds; minerals ...


G98-1356 Polyacrylamide – A Method To Reduce Soil Erosion, C. Dean Yonts, Brian Benham Jan 1998

G98-1356 Polyacrylamide – A Method To Reduce Soil Erosion, C. Dean Yonts, Brian Benham

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes polyacrylamide, what it is, how it can be used to reduce soil erosion due to, irrigation and what water management changes must be considered.

Topsoil loss can mean a long-term reduction in soil productivity, crop yield and the life expectancy of downstream storage reservoirs. In the short term, producers are faced with reuse pits to clean or a buildup of soil at the lower ends of fields which must be redistributed. Measures must be taken to reduce or eliminate soil erosion and sustain Nebraska's soil resource.


Ec98-750 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 12: Silage Storage, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-750 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 12: Silage Storage, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Why should I be concerned? Silage is an important feed for livestock-based agriculture. When properly harvested and stored, silage poses little or no pollution threat, but improper handling can lead to a significant flow of silage juices (or leachate) from the silo. Leachate is an organic liquid that results from pressure in the silo or from extra water entering the silo. It is usually a problem only when silage is fresh, or just after storage. This loss of leachate represents a loss of nutrient value from the silage.


Ec98-749 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Fact Sheet 12: Improving Silage Storage, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-749 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Fact Sheet 12: Improving Silage Storage, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Silage is an important feed for livestock-based agriculture. When properly harvested and stored, silage poses little or no pollution threat, but improper handling can lead to a significant flow of silage juices (or leachate) from the silo. Leachate is an organic liquid that results from pressure in the silo or from extra water entering the silo. It is usually a problem only when silage is fresh, or just after storage. This loss of leachate represents a loss of nutrient value from the silage.


Ec98-748 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 2: Site Evaluation, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-748 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 2: Site Evaluation, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Why is the site evaluation important? The effect of farm, ranch or homesite practices on groundwater depends in part on the physical characteristics of your site: soil type, subsurface characteristics and depth to groundwater. That’s why evaluating the soils and geologic characteristics of your site is such an important step in protecting the groundwater you drink. This evaluation focuses primarily on the farmstead or homesite and risk to groundwater, but, to a limited extent, also addresses surface water. The worksheet can be applied to land beyond the farmstead or homesite, but the variation in soils and geologic materials would ...


Ec98-747 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska's System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Summary Worksheet 1: Overall Assessment, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-747 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska's System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Summary Worksheet 1: Overall Assessment, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication is the first of many dealing with Nebraska's Water Contamination. Getting started You will return to this worksheet after completing all other worksheets. It is designed toreview your total activities and give you a summary of areas of concern. It is suggested that you complete Worksheet 2 first and then complete all additional worksheets that pertain to your farm, ranch, or homesite. Transfer results from individual worksheets to complete this overall summary


Ec98-754 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 7: Hazardous Materials And Waste Management, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-754 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 7: Hazardous Materials And Waste Management, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Why should I be concerned? Consider the variety of products commonly used in households, on acreages and on farms: paints, solvents, oils, cleaners, wood preservatives, batteries, adhesives, and pesticides. Also consider the amount of these products which goes unused or is thrown away. Some common disposal practices can create an unsafe environment around the home and may contaminate groundwater. Additionally, many of these common disposal practices violate Nebraska law.


Ec98-752 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 9: Livestock Manure Storage, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-752 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 9: Livestock Manure Storage, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Why should I be concerned? Accumulating manure in storage incurs certain risks to the environment and to human and animal health unless appropriate precautions are taken.Manure can contribute nutrients and disease-causing organisms to both surface water and groundwater.


Ec98-751 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Fact Sheet 9: Improving Livestock Manure Storage, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-751 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Fact Sheet 9: Improving Livestock Manure Storage, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Manure storage is an important manure management option for livestock producers. Stored manure can be applied to the soil when nutrient uptake by crops can be maximized and weather related losses minimized. Preplant applications of manure incorporated into the soil ensures maximum crop nutrient value, while reducing risks of water contamination.


Ec98-758 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 11: Land Application Of Manure, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-758 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 11: Land Application Of Manure, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Why should I be concerned? Stewardship of soil and water resources should be a goal of every livestock producer. Management decisions made relative to land application of livestock manure will influence the ability to attain that goal.


Ec98-757 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Fact Sheet 11: Improving Land Application Of Manure, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-757 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Fact Sheet 11: Improving Land Application Of Manure, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Resource or waste? Stewardship of soil and water resources should be a goal of every livestock producer. Management decisions made relative to land application of livestock manure will influence the ability to attain that goal. An evaluation of your land application practices should focus on the following question: Is manure a waste or are source?


Ec98-756 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 13: Milking Center Effluent Treatment, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-756 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 13: Milking Center Effluent Treatment, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Why should I be concerned? Milking center effluent is usually considered a dairy sanitation problem. If not properly managed, however, the effluent can contaminate both groundwater and surface water.


Ec98-755 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Fact Sheet 13: Improving Milking Center Effluent Treatment, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-755 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Fact Sheet 13: Improving Milking Center Effluent Treatment, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Effluent from the dairy milking center, including discharges from the milking parlor (manure, feed solids, hoof dirt) and milkhouse (bulk tank and pipeline rinse water and detergent used in cleaning), is commonly disposed of in a variety of ways. Milking center effluent offers several unique challenges due to the presence of: 1. Large volumes of contaminated water which can overwhelm soil absorption systems. 2. Milk solids and fats and manure solids which plug many systems. 3. Cleaning sanitizers which reduce bacterial breakdown of solids. When these systems fail, effluent will become a risk to surface and groundwater quality.


Ec98-766 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Worksheet 3: Drinking Water Well Condition, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-766 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Worksheet 3: Drinking Water Well Condition, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Why should I be concerned? Essentially all of Nebraska’s rural residents use groundwater to supply their drinking water and farm needs. Wells should provide clean water. If wells are improperly constructed or maintained, however, they can allow bacteria, pesticides, fertilizer, oil products, or other pollutants to contaminate groundwater. These contaminants can put family, pets and livestock health at risk.


Ec98-765 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Fact Sheet 3: Improving Drinking Water Well Condition, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-765 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Fact Sheet 3: Improving Drinking Water Well Condition, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Groundwater protection is an important aspect of farm, ranch and rural homesite management today. Nearly all rural families rely on groundwater for their drinking water. Safeguarding the drinking water depends on where the well is placed on the site, how the well was constructed, how the well is maintained, the siting of new wells, and managing wells no longer in use.


Ec98-763 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Worksheet 6: Petroleum Product Storage, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-763 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Worksheet 6: Petroleum Product Storage, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Why should I be concerned? Aboveground and underground storage of liquid petroleum products such as motor fuel and heating fuel presents a threat to public health and the environment. Nearly one out of every four underground storage tanks in the United States may now be leaking, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. If an underground petroleum tank is more than 20 years old, especially if it’s not protected against corrosion, the potential for leaking increases dramatically. Newer tanks and piping can leak, too, especially if they were improperly installed.


Ec98-761 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Worksheet 10: Livestock Yards Management, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-761 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Worksheet 10: Livestock Yards Management, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Why should I be concerned? Livestock yards, such as barnyards, holding areas and feedlots, are areas of concentrated livestock wastes and a potential source of nutrient, solids, and bacteria contamination of surface and groundwater. Yards that are abandoned permanently or are inactive temporarily also represent a potential risk.


Ec98-759 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Fact Sheet 10: Improving Livestock Yards Management, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-759 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Fact Sheet 10: Improving Livestock Yards Management, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Besides addressing the potential of livestock yards to pollute surface and groundwater, other good reasons for improving management practices include ease of maintenance, improved herd health, and quality milk or meat production. This fact sheet discusses six issues critical to minimizing the impact of livestock yards on water quality.


Ec98-772 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Worksheet 8: Household Wastewater Treatment, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-772 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Worksheet 8: Household Wastewater Treatment, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Why should I be concerned? Virtually all farms and rural housing use a septic system or similar on-site wastewater treatment system. While these systems are generally economical and safe, household wastewater can contain contaminants that degrade water quality for uses such as drinking, pet and stock watering, food preparation, and cleaning. Potential contaminants in household wastewater include disease-causing bacteria, infectious viruses, household chemicals, and excess nutrients, such as nitrate.


Ec98-771 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Fact Sheet 8: Improving Household Wastewater Treatment, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-771 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Fact Sheet 8: Improving Household Wastewater Treatment, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

A properly installed and maintained system for treating and disposing of household wastewater will minimize the impact of that system on groundwater and surfacewater. State and local codes specify how wastewater systems must be designed, installed, and maintained. For example, Title 124 regulates the design, operation, and maintenance of septic tank systems in Nebraska. In addition, federal and state regulations guide the stabilization and land application of wastewater septage.


Ec98-770 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Worksheet 5: Fertilizer Storage And Handling, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-770 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Worksheet 5: Fertilizer Storage And Handling, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Why should I be concerned? Fertilizers play a vital role in agriculture. Over the years, fertilizers have increased farm production dramatically. Commercial fertilizer is, however, a major source of nitrate. Your drinking water is least likely to be contaminated if you follow appropriate management procedures or dispose of wastes off the farm site. However, proper offsite disposal practices are essential to avoid risking contamination that could affect the water supplies and health of others.


Ec98-769 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Fact Sheet 5: Improving Fertilizer Storage And Handling, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-769 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Fact Sheet 5: Improving Fertilizer Storage And Handling, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Fertilizer storage practices If stored safely in a secure location, fertilizers pose little danger to groundwater. Common sense suggests keeping fertilizer dry and out of the way of activities that might rip open a bag or allow rain to enter a bulk container.