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Series

1980

Soil

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Education

G80-526 The Effect Of Weather On Corn: Preseason Precipitation And Yield Of Unirrigationed Corn, Ralph E. Neild Jan 1980

G80-526 The Effect Of Weather On Corn: Preseason Precipitation And Yield Of Unirrigationed Corn, Ralph E. Neild

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide examines the results of studies done on the effects of weather on unirrigationd corn.

Studies of the effects of weather on unirrigationd corn in Nebraska between 1950 and 1974 show the following four factors to be closely related to yield:

Technology--the availability of better hybrids, nitrogen fertilizer, herbicides, insecticides and other improvements have resulted in a yield increase averaging 1.3 bushel per acre per year since 1950.

Preseason precipitation--that which occurred between September 1 and May 15 had a beneficial effect. Yield increased on the average of 1.1 bushel per acre for each inch that preseason ...


G80-496 Tomatoes In The Home Garden, Laurie Hodges, Dale T. Lindgren, Susan Schoneweis Jan 1980

G80-496 Tomatoes In The Home Garden, Laurie Hodges, Dale T. Lindgren, Susan Schoneweis

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide outlines tomato rearing practices, cultivars and possible pest, disease and weed control problems.

Tomatoes come in a wide range of fruit colors, sizes, shapes and maturities. Ripe tomatoes may be red, yellow, orange, pink or even green. Shapes vary from globe or round to slightly flattened, pear-like or cherry-sized. Often consumers complain tomatoes purchased in grocery stores are lacking in flavor or have tough skin. In a home garden, you can grow the tomatoes you prefer, including a wide selection of fruit colors, flavors, textures and sizes. Although rumored, there is no direct link between fruit acidity and ...


G80-513 Protect Soil With Vegetative Residues, C,R, Fenster Jan 1980

G80-513 Protect Soil With Vegetative Residues, C,R, Fenster

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Keeping a protective cover of vegetative residues on the soil surface is the simplest and surest way to control both water and wind erosion.

Crop residues are vital to conservation of soil and water. Keeping a protective cover of vegetative residues on the soil surface is the simplest and surest way to control both water and wind erosion. Vegetative residues on the soil surface improve infiltration of water into the soil, reduce evaporation, and aid in maintaining organic matter. Residues left upright all winter trap snow which increases soil water.