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Series

1980

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Farming

Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Education

G80-526 The Effect Of Weather On Corn: Preseason Precipitation And Yield Of Unirrigationed Corn, Ralph E. Neild Jan 1980

G80-526 The Effect Of Weather On Corn: Preseason Precipitation And Yield Of Unirrigationed Corn, Ralph E. Neild

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide examines the results of studies done on the effects of weather on unirrigationd corn.

Studies of the effects of weather on unirrigationd corn in Nebraska between 1950 and 1974 show the following four factors to be closely related to yield:

Technology--the availability of better hybrids, nitrogen fertilizer, herbicides, insecticides and other improvements have resulted in a yield increase averaging 1.3 bushel per acre per year since 1950.

Preseason precipitation--that which occurred between September 1 and May 15 had a beneficial effect. Yield increased on the average of 1.1 bushel per acre for each inch that preseason ...


G80-518 Factors In Marketing Corn, W. Duane Foote Jan 1980

G80-518 Factors In Marketing Corn, W. Duane Foote

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses grain standards for corn and how they effect the value of corn.

Grading standards have been established for corn, wheat, barley, oats, rye, sorghum, flax seed, soybeans, triticale, and mixed grain. Grade requirements are designed to describe grain and provide the foundation for pricing. Within a defined range, grain standards inform buyers and sellers about the general characteristics of the grain being graded. Thus, a uniform system of grading is essential for the orderly marketing of grain.


G80-487 Spring Small Grains Variety Selection (Revised January 1992), Russell Moomaw, Lenis Alton Nelson, David Baltensperger, Roger Hammons Jan 1980

G80-487 Spring Small Grains Variety Selection (Revised January 1992), Russell Moomaw, Lenis Alton Nelson, David Baltensperger, Roger Hammons

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Tests indicate which varieties of oats, barley and spring wheat are best adapted to Nebraska growing conditions. The primary spring small grain grown in Nebraska is oats. Oats are grown throughout the state, but production is concentrated in the east and northeast cropping districts. Nebraska's estimated harvested oat acreage in 1989 was 310,000 acres. Spring barley production is centered in the northwest and southwest districts. Harvested barley acreage in 1990 was 30,000 acres. Barley is commonly grown as an early summer feed grain and corn substitute. Spring wheat production in Nebraska is concentrated in the northern section ...


G80-505 Economics Of Energy Used In Fallow Systems For Winter Wheat-Fallow Rotation, Robert E.J. Retzlaff, Vernon L. Hofman Jan 1980

G80-505 Economics Of Energy Used In Fallow Systems For Winter Wheat-Fallow Rotation, Robert E.J. Retzlaff, Vernon L. Hofman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the economic advantages of using a fallow system with winter wheat.

In 1979, Americans watched gasoline, diesel, and other petroleum products dramatically increase in price. The amount of imported crude oil increased and the demand continued strong despite higher prices. Conservation of energy, either forced or voluntary, seems to be one of the key solutions to the energy crisis.


G80-530 Brooder House And Equipment For The Home Flock, Earl W. Gleaves Jan 1980

G80-530 Brooder House And Equipment For The Home Flock, Earl W. Gleaves

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses housing and equipment needs for raising home poultry flocks.

This NebGuide lists and describes some of the types of houses and equipment that can be used to raise a home poultry flock. Other management suggestions are included in a series of NebGuides that are available from your county Extension office.


G80-509 Canada Thistle, Robert G. Wilson Jan 1980

G80-509 Canada Thistle, Robert G. Wilson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The growth and control of Canada thistle is covered here.

Canada thistle plant

Canada thistle [Cirsium arvense (L) Scop.] is a native of Eurasia and was probably introduced to America around 1750. Since that time it has spread throughout the northern part of the United States. Canada thistle is estimated to infest 800,000 acres in northern and western Nebraska.

A perennial that reproduces from seed and by an extensive root system, Canada thistle is dioecious, with the male and female flowers on separate plants. For viable seed to be produced, both male and female plants need to be present.