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Series

1980

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Control

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Full-Text Articles in Education

G80-486 Crickets (Revised June 1987), David L. Keith, Shripat T. Kamble Jan 1980

G80-486 Crickets (Revised June 1987), David L. Keith, Shripat T. Kamble

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Crickets: identification, damage, and control.

Crickets belong to the order Orthoptera, most members of which have enlarged hind legs, adapted for jumping. In addition, members of this group possess opaque, leather-like forewings that cover a pair of clear, membranous hindwings. Most crickets are nocturnal, whereas their grasshopper cousins are active only during the daytime. Members of the cricket family usually have very long antennae and their wings have the front margin folded sharply over the side of the body, giving them a "boxlike" appearance. Female crickets are characterized by having long, spear-shaped ovipositers, used for egg-laying.

Crickets are sometimes confused ...


G80-496 Tomatoes In The Home Garden, Laurie Hodges, Dale T. Lindgren, Susan Schoneweis Jan 1980

G80-496 Tomatoes In The Home Garden, Laurie Hodges, Dale T. Lindgren, Susan Schoneweis

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide outlines tomato rearing practices, cultivars and possible pest, disease and weed control problems.

Tomatoes come in a wide range of fruit colors, sizes, shapes and maturities. Ripe tomatoes may be red, yellow, orange, pink or even green. Shapes vary from globe or round to slightly flattened, pear-like or cherry-sized. Often consumers complain tomatoes purchased in grocery stores are lacking in flavor or have tough skin. In a home garden, you can grow the tomatoes you prefer, including a wide selection of fruit colors, flavors, textures and sizes. Although rumored, there is no direct link between fruit acidity and ...


G80-509 Canada Thistle, Robert G. Wilson Jan 1980

G80-509 Canada Thistle, Robert G. Wilson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The growth and control of Canada thistle is covered here.

Canada thistle plant

Canada thistle [Cirsium arvense (L) Scop.] is a native of Eurasia and was probably introduced to America around 1750. Since that time it has spread throughout the northern part of the United States. Canada thistle is estimated to infest 800,000 acres in northern and western Nebraska.

A perennial that reproduces from seed and by an extensive root system, Canada thistle is dioecious, with the male and female flowers on separate plants. For viable seed to be produced, both male and female plants need to be present.