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Articles 1 - 16 of 16

Full-Text Articles in Education

An Experiment In Discovery, Daniel J. Steck Dec 1980

An Experiment In Discovery, Daniel J. Steck

Physics Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


A Proper Attitude Toward Science, William W. Cobern Jul 1980

A Proper Attitude Toward Science, William W. Cobern

Scientific Literacy and Cultural Studies Project

The attitude of a man determine his speech and actions. That is why it is more important for children to leave school with positives attitudes about learning than with acquired and refined skills and knowledge. A child in school may learn to read but unless he also gains a positive attitude about reading he will not read on his own. So it is with science. Along with the acquisition of the skills and knowledge of science should come a positive attitude about science. Furthermore in the field of science as well as a positive one. This is the subject at ...


An Experimental Study Of The Effects Of Required Homework Review Versus Review On Request Upon Achievement, Dolores Dick Jul 1980

An Experimental Study Of The Effects Of Required Homework Review Versus Review On Request Upon Achievement, Dolores Dick

Masters Theses & Specialist Projects

During the 1979-80 school year, two Algebra I classes were involved in a study to test the effects of two methods for reviewing homework problems on students' achievements and attitudes. One review procedure was to solve and explain each problem during the class period that followed the class period in which the homework assignment had been made. The other procedure involved solving and explaining only the problems that students requested to have reviewed. While one procedure was being used with one class, the other procedure was being used with the comparison class. One treatment procedure was used with a class ...


The Section Of Mammals Of Carnegie Museum Of Natural History, Hugh H. Genoways, Duane A. Schlitter Jun 1980

The Section Of Mammals Of Carnegie Museum Of Natural History, Hugh H. Genoways, Duane A. Schlitter

Mammalogy Papers: University of Nebraska State Museum

The Section of Mammals at Carnegie Museum of Natural History is responsible for the care of the collections of Recent mammals, and research on these collections. "Recent mammals?!" The capitalized word "Recent" refers to the geological time period since the last ice age (about 10,000 years ago) until the present time. Mammals are that group of animals characterized by the presence of hair at least during some time of their lives, warm blood, and the production of milk. Therefore, our work really involves living mammals with which everyone is familiar; however, our work also does include study of such ...


Objectives Of Animal Use In Biology Courses, William V. Mayer Jan 1980

Objectives Of Animal Use In Biology Courses, William V. Mayer

EDUCATION

To confine discussion of educational use of animals to experimentation is to focus on only part of the animal use problem. To focus on use of animals in the classroom solely is to negate the value of field and community resource areas such as zoos, animal parks, nature trails, etc. The primary objective in dealing with living organisms is to inculcate a respect for all life. Objectives that focus on use of living animals for experimental purposes can, at best, be secondary and may in many cases be contrived. An understanding of animal life requirements and animal contributions is an ...


Reverence For Life: An Ethic For High School Biology Curricula, George K. Russell Jan 1980

Reverence For Life: An Ethic For High School Biology Curricula, George K. Russell

EDUCATION

Ethical and pedagogical arguments are presented against the use of animals by high school students in experiments causing pain/suffering/death of the animal. No justification is seen for such experimentation when perfectly valid alternatives, using noninvasive techniques, exist or could be developed. An important concern is the emotional and psychological growth of young people. An overall objective of high school biology curricula must be to assist students in making viable connections with living biological processes and the natural world.


Secondary And Elementary School Use Of Live And Preserved Animals, Marvin B. Emmons Jan 1980

Secondary And Elementary School Use Of Live And Preserved Animals, Marvin B. Emmons

EDUCATION

The broad use of living animals in elementary and junior school programs that are currently in vogue will be discussed as well as their use in biology classrooms at the senior high level. A comparison will be made of the present use of animals in the biology curriculum at the high school level, both living and preserved, with the use levels some ten and fifteen years ago. The implications of wildlife habitat encroachment and subsequent depletion of native species of classic animal models as well as some alternatives will be reviewed.


No Pain Infliction By Untrained Youths, Christine Stevens Jan 1980

No Pain Infliction By Untrained Youths, Christine Stevens

EDUCATION

Outlined are the efforts of the Animal Welfare Institute (AWl) for the last twenty-five years to end abuses to animals in high school biology programs. After concluding that the AWl's two brief rules prohibiting painful experimentation were not well understood by students even after years of effort, the AWl adopted the rules of the Canadian science fairs, which are similar to the Westinghouse Talent Search in that they simply prohibit experimentation on vertebrate animals. The presentation includes reference to the AWI manual, "Humane Biology Projects."


High School Science Fairs: Evaluation Of Live Animal Experimentation--The Canadian Experience, Harry C. Rowsell Jan 1980

High School Science Fairs: Evaluation Of Live Animal Experimentation--The Canadian Experience, Harry C. Rowsell

EDUCATION

When the Canadian Council on Animal Care was established in 1968, the Council, together with representatives from the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association in concert with the Youth Science Foundation, recognized the importance of well-conceived science fair projects involving live animals. It was recognized as well that poor science encouraged poor attitudes toward the animals involved, as well as a misunderstanding of scientific investigation. Numerous schemes were tried in an effort to ensure development of proper scientific investigational attitudes as well as a respect for living things. These will be discussed, outlining where such schemes failed.

In May, 1975, Regulations for ...


The Challenge And Motivation Of Students Through Live Animal Projects, Thurman S. Grafton Jan 1980

The Challenge And Motivation Of Students Through Live Animal Projects, Thurman S. Grafton

EDUCATION

The subject of use of live animals by secondary schools either in classroom work or science fairs is a very controversial and often emotional issue. The author emphasizes the dedication to humane treatment of animals while at the same time explaining the process by which rules have been formulated to provide for the appropriate use of live animals. The difference between permission and mandate is clarified for the purpose of explaining the need to provide for the more effective challenge and motivation of the high achiever while still allowing for more modest undertakings by the average student The perils of ...


The Vertebrate Animal In High School Biology, Alan M. Beck Jan 1980

The Vertebrate Animal In High School Biology, Alan M. Beck

EDUCATION

Live vertebrates afford opportunities to capture student interest and develop important educational experiences. Humane care and handling of the animals can be one of the most significant aspects of the lesson.

The study of classroom animals could include a wide range of observational and experimental protocols that do not compromise humane or conservational standards while providing background on the basics of science that encourage and prepare the student for continued education. Basic attention to detail and careful supervision will insure humane care of the animals and minimize the possibility of injury to students from bites and infection or discomfort from ...


Student (And Animal) Welfare, Leonard M. Krause Jan 1980

Student (And Animal) Welfare, Leonard M. Krause

EDUCATION

Adolescents exhibit affection for numerous vertebrates and appear to sympathize and to identify with traumas these animals experience. Therapeutic benefits students attach to nurturing and breeding certain vertebrates are evident; destruction of these same creatures produces clearly negative attitudes by students toward the science course and the instructor. "Case histories" documented while teaching high school students working with vertebrates are reviewed and are related to specific techniques (e.g., pithing) utilized by numerous instructors. Motivation, increased attention span, sustained interest, involvement with community issues and other desirable educational goals are demonstrated to be resultants of student involvement with living vertebrates ...


Animals In British Schools: Legal And Practical Problems, Jennifer Remfry Jan 1980

Animals In British Schools: Legal And Practical Problems, Jennifer Remfry

EDUCATION

Well-managed, healthy animals can be useful and beneficial aids to the emotional and intellectual development of young people at the primary and secondary levels of education. In Britain, vertebrate animals are not used in schools for experiments which might cause pain, distress or disease. The laws protecting animals are comprehensive but at present it is the Health and Safety at Work Act (1974) which is having the most impact on the keeping of animals in British schools. The practical skills most needed by teachers are in the handling, sexing and humane killing of animals. Training of teachers should include instruction ...


Science Youth Activities And Animal Experimentation, E. G. Sherburne Jr. Jan 1980

Science Youth Activities And Animal Experimentation, E. G. Sherburne Jr.

EDUCATION

Science youth activities (extracurricular science activities) involve millions of young people at the elementary and secondary school level. Such activities are popular with young people and with teachers because they offer values different from those provided by classroom work and the required laboratory. National science youth activity programs include science fairs and the International Science and Engineering Fair, the Science Talent Search, and a number of other programs. For activities involving research, animals have been increasingly used because of the increased sophistication of the students doing the work. While some projects using vertebrates may be done poorly, it is suggested ...


Humaneness Supersedes Curiosity, F. Barbara Orlans Jan 1980

Humaneness Supersedes Curiosity, F. Barbara Orlans

EDUCATION

Ethical considerations need to be addressed with respect to educational use of animals. Society extends greater latitude in what is permissible to do to an animal in the name of science to a professional research worker than to a high school student. A balance needs to be made of the significance of the expected experimental results, on the one hand, which the ethical costs, (in terms of pain or death to the animal), on the other. A reasonable boundary can be drawn, based on ethical as well as on practical considerations, to exclude invasive procedures on vertebrate animals in high ...


Fundamental Criteria For Determining The Educational Value Of Live Animal Experimentation In High School Science Fairs, David H. Neil Jan 1980

Fundamental Criteria For Determining The Educational Value Of Live Animal Experimentation In High School Science Fairs, David H. Neil

EDUCATION

The author contends that great and very detailed attention to one minuscule facet of experimental animal biology, particularly if it requires the skilled and uniform alteration of a significant number of animals, is of no real educational value to a high school student. This type of work, the necessity for it and the full understanding of its significance to the furtherance of human understanding must be the province only of those who are intellectually prepared. The suggestion is made that projects, which develop a more complete understanding of common and profoundly important elements in life (as we know it), should ...