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Farm, Ranch And Home Quarterly Institute Of Agriculture And Natural Resources, University Of Nebraska- Lincoln Jul 1980

Farm, Ranch And Home Quarterly Institute Of Agriculture And Natural Resources, University Of Nebraska- Lincoln

Farm, Ranch and Home Quarterly

In this issue:

Facilities, Staff Benefit State......................... 2

Questions and Answers On Divorce....................... 3

Hassle-Free Guide to a Better Diet-Five Groups Aid in Wise Food Choices....................... 7

Enders Reservoir-Inflow Decline Poses Problem................ 8

Research Digest............................. 10

WEEDS-Identification Aids in Control ................... 12

1920-1980-60 Years of Tractor Testing ................... 14

Waste Recycling-A' Mountain' of Resources for Soil Improvement...................................... 18

Curriculum-Decision Making in Education........................ 22

New Directions in Research .............................. 24


The Section Of Mammals Of Carnegie Museum Of Natural History, Hugh H. Genoways, Duane A. Schlitter Jun 1980

The Section Of Mammals Of Carnegie Museum Of Natural History, Hugh H. Genoways, Duane A. Schlitter

Mammalogy Papers: University of Nebraska State Museum

The Section of Mammals at Carnegie Museum of Natural History is responsible for the care of the collections of Recent mammals, and research on these collections. "Recent mammals?!" The capitalized word "Recent" refers to the geological time period since the last ice age (about 10,000 years ago) until the present time. Mammals are that group of animals characterized by the presence of hair at least during some time of their lives, warm blood, and the production of milk. Therefore, our work really involves living mammals with which everyone is familiar; however, our work also does include study of such ...


Farm, Ranch And Home Quarterly Institute Of Agriculture And Natural Resources, University Of Nebraska- Lincoln Apr 1980

Farm, Ranch And Home Quarterly Institute Of Agriculture And Natural Resources, University Of Nebraska- Lincoln

Farm, Ranch and Home Quarterly

In this issue:

IANR Energy Concerns..................... 2

Rust, Leaf Spot- Winter Wheat's Costly Foe..................... 3

The Swift Fox- An Endangered Species.................... 6

The Role of Women in Public Affairs..................... 8

Soybean Applicators- New Weapons Against Weeds................ 10

Close-up- Roller Herbicide Applicator................... 12

Research Digest.................. 14

Human Development and the Family- A Career to Touch All Ages, Areas of Family Life................... 16

Land Use- Nebraska's Changing Profile..................... 18

Energy Management- Best Weapons Against Rising Fuel Costs...................... 22


Farm, Ranch And Home Quarterly Institute Of Agriculture And Natural Resources, University Of Nebraska- Lincoln Jan 1980

Farm, Ranch And Home Quarterly Institute Of Agriculture And Natural Resources, University Of Nebraska- Lincoln

Farm, Ranch and Home Quarterly

In this issue

: Market Center Proposed...................................... 2

Founder-Researchers Seek Baseline Information .......................... 3

Research Digest .......................................... 4

'Technical Assistance is Key In Food Production Development ......................... 6

Botulism-A Big Problem in a Small Package ........................ 8

Pen of Three-Youth Experience in Beef Production ...................................... 11

Applicators Tested for Soybean Herbicide Control ...................................... 12

Fuel Survey-Keeping Tabs on Energy Use ................... 14

Creativity in Young Children .............................. 16

Education Importance and Satisfaction- QUALITY OF LIFE................................ 18

Alexandria: A Study in Community Development .......................................... 22


G80-517 Kentucky Bluegrass Lawn Calendar (Revised October 1994), Roch E. Gaussoin, Terrance P. Riordan, Garald L. Horse, John E. Watkins, Frederick P. Baxendale Jan 1980

G80-517 Kentucky Bluegrass Lawn Calendar (Revised October 1994), Roch E. Gaussoin, Terrance P. Riordan, Garald L. Horse, John E. Watkins, Frederick P. Baxendale

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication calendar contains information on mowing, fertilizing, waternig, herbicides, insect control, disease control, thatch removal, aerification, and overseeding of a Kentucky Bluegrass Lawn.


G80-510 Sagebrush Control, Robert G. Wilson, Patrick E. Reece Jan 1980

G80-510 Sagebrush Control, Robert G. Wilson, Patrick E. Reece

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Sagebrush is an all encompassing term commonly used to describe Artemisia species found on range and pasture lands in Nebraska. The dominant woody sagebrush species found in western Nebraska are sand sagebrush, fringed sagebrush, green sagewort, and big sagebrush. These species vary in appearance, distribution and control recommendations. All four species are perennials, have deep extensive root systems and flower in the latter part of the summer. The leaves of sagebrush have a strong odor as a result of camphor like compounds. Palatability and digestibility of sagebrush species found in Nebraska tend to be poor because of high volatile oil ...


G80-521 Common Stalk Borer In Corn (Revised April 2000), Robert J. Wright, Thomas E. Hunt, Keith J. Jarvi Jan 1980

G80-521 Common Stalk Borer In Corn (Revised April 2000), Robert J. Wright, Thomas E. Hunt, Keith J. Jarvi

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The life history and appearance of common stalk borers is described, along with information on damage they can cause, economic injury levels and ways to control them in corn.

In the past, the common stalk borer, Papaipema nebris, has not been a major pest of corn in Nebraska. Stalk borer damage in corn commonly is confined to occasional plants in the first few rows near field margins, fence rows, grass terraces and waterways. In addition to attacking corn, this insect attacks over one hundred other species of plants, including ornamentals, broadleaf weeds and grasses. It may feed on soybeans as ...


G80-504 Proper Livestock Grazing Distribution On Rangeland (Revised February 1996), Jerry D. Volesky, Walter H. Schacht, Steven S. Waller Jan 1980

G80-504 Proper Livestock Grazing Distribution On Rangeland (Revised February 1996), Jerry D. Volesky, Walter H. Schacht, Steven S. Waller

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Good grazing distribution can increase harvest efficiency and grazing capacity. This NebGuide discusses common grazing problems and offers solutions.

The 23 million acres of rangeland in Nebraska are mostly grassland and are primarily devoted to forage production for Nebraska's multibillion dollar beef cattle industry. Nebraska's rangelands are inherently productive, and potential returns from efficient management practices are high for livestock producers.

Proper grazing distribution is a factor which can increase livestock production from Nebraska's rangeland. Grazing distribution refers to dispersion of grazing animals over a management unit. It is just one element of good grazing management which ...


G80-513 Protect Soil With Vegetative Residues, C,R, Fenster Jan 1980

G80-513 Protect Soil With Vegetative Residues, C,R, Fenster

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Keeping a protective cover of vegetative residues on the soil surface is the simplest and surest way to control both water and wind erosion.

Crop residues are vital to conservation of soil and water. Keeping a protective cover of vegetative residues on the soil surface is the simplest and surest way to control both water and wind erosion. Vegetative residues on the soil surface improve infiltration of water into the soil, reduce evaporation, and aid in maintaining organic matter. Residues left upright all winter trap snow which increases soil water.


G80-500 Ecofarming: Selection Of Tractor Mounted Or Pull-Type Sprayers, Norman L. Klocke, G. A. Wicks, R. Fenster Jan 1980

G80-500 Ecofarming: Selection Of Tractor Mounted Or Pull-Type Sprayers, Norman L. Klocke, G. A. Wicks, R. Fenster

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Uniform application of dependable herbicides in the ecofarming program is a key to its success. A good sprayer is needed to accomplish this, and not every new sprayer available will do the job. The following sprayer components should be checked carefully: pump, tank, tank agitation, flow-control assembly, strainers and screens, distribution system (including boom), and nozzles. Each of the components is important if the sprayer is to do an accurate and uniform job of application.


G80-488 Spring And Summer Black Stem Diseases Of Alfalfa (Revised June 1992), John E. Watkins, Fred A. Gray Jan 1980

G80-488 Spring And Summer Black Stem Diseases Of Alfalfa (Revised June 1992), John E. Watkins, Fred A. Gray

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Spring and summer black stem of alfalfa, their causes, symptoms, and control are discussed.

Of the two black stem diseases found in the central and northern Great Plains, spring black stem predominates summer black stem. Both are damaging when weather conditions favor their development. Although their symptoms differ, each causes spotting and darkening of stems and spotting of leaves.


G80-530 Brooder House And Equipment For The Home Flock, Earl W. Gleaves Jan 1980

G80-530 Brooder House And Equipment For The Home Flock, Earl W. Gleaves

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses housing and equipment needs for raising home poultry flocks.

This NebGuide lists and describes some of the types of houses and equipment that can be used to raise a home poultry flock. Other management suggestions are included in a series of NebGuides that are available from your county Extension office.


G80-524 Incubation For The Home Flock, Earl W. Gleaves Jan 1980

G80-524 Incubation For The Home Flock, Earl W. Gleaves

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide covers how to build and operate an incubator to hatch eggs for a home flock.

Various makes and models of commercial incubators are available for use by the home flock owner.


G80-486 Crickets (Revised June 1987), David L. Keith, Shripat T. Kamble Jan 1980

G80-486 Crickets (Revised June 1987), David L. Keith, Shripat T. Kamble

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Crickets: identification, damage, and control.

Crickets belong to the order Orthoptera, most members of which have enlarged hind legs, adapted for jumping. In addition, members of this group possess opaque, leather-like forewings that cover a pair of clear, membranous hindwings. Most crickets are nocturnal, whereas their grasshopper cousins are active only during the daytime. Members of the cricket family usually have very long antennae and their wings have the front margin folded sharply over the side of the body, giving them a "boxlike" appearance. Female crickets are characterized by having long, spear-shaped ovipositers, used for egg-laying.

Crickets are sometimes confused ...


G80-525 Drip Irrigation For Windbreaks, Walter L. Trimmer, Brian R. Chandler Jan 1980

G80-525 Drip Irrigation For Windbreaks, Walter L. Trimmer, Brian R. Chandler

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide contains information on designing and installing drip irrigation systems, which can help your trees become effective windbreaks at an earlier date than non-irrigationd trees.

Windbreaks can be a valuable asset to farmers ranchers and rural residents. A properly designed tree windbreak or shelterbelt provides protection for livestock, crops and farmsteads. A windbreak can also mean significant energy savings for heating a rural residence.

Drip or trickle irrigation can help establish successful tree plantings and help them become effective windbreaks at an earlier date than non-irrigationd trees. Drip irrigating windbreaks can mean significant labor savings and less water use ...


Ec17-11-80 Nebraska Outdoor Education Series: Plant A Tree, Joe Range, John D. Orr Jan 1980

Ec17-11-80 Nebraska Outdoor Education Series: Plant A Tree, Joe Range, John D. Orr

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Not all trees or shrubs can find a home in your yard or apartment. Help your child to discover a home for the tree or shrub he or she grows or receives. The greatest benefit of this Plant-A-Tree project is being close to a living plant. This project will: introduce five tree planters - one from each area of Nebraska, discuss the parts of tree seeds, give examples of how tree seeds travel, discuss preparation of soil, demonstrate how to grow a seedling tree from seed, demonstrate how to transplant a tree, and offer suggestions for activities and exhibits.


G80-526 The Effect Of Weather On Corn: Preseason Precipitation And Yield Of Unirrigationed Corn, Ralph E. Neild Jan 1980

G80-526 The Effect Of Weather On Corn: Preseason Precipitation And Yield Of Unirrigationed Corn, Ralph E. Neild

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide examines the results of studies done on the effects of weather on unirrigationd corn.

Studies of the effects of weather on unirrigationd corn in Nebraska between 1950 and 1974 show the following four factors to be closely related to yield:

Technology--the availability of better hybrids, nitrogen fertilizer, herbicides, insecticides and other improvements have resulted in a yield increase averaging 1.3 bushel per acre per year since 1950.

Preseason precipitation--that which occurred between September 1 and May 15 had a beneficial effect. Yield increased on the average of 1.1 bushel per acre for each inch that preseason ...


G80-487 Spring Small Grains Variety Selection (Revised January 1992), Russell Moomaw, Lenis Alton Nelson, David Baltensperger, Roger Hammons Jan 1980

G80-487 Spring Small Grains Variety Selection (Revised January 1992), Russell Moomaw, Lenis Alton Nelson, David Baltensperger, Roger Hammons

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Tests indicate which varieties of oats, barley and spring wheat are best adapted to Nebraska growing conditions. The primary spring small grain grown in Nebraska is oats. Oats are grown throughout the state, but production is concentrated in the east and northeast cropping districts. Nebraska's estimated harvested oat acreage in 1989 was 310,000 acres. Spring barley production is centered in the northwest and southwest districts. Harvested barley acreage in 1990 was 30,000 acres. Barley is commonly grown as an early summer feed grain and corn substitute. Spring wheat production in Nebraska is concentrated in the northern section ...


G80-537 Reproductive Trace Anatomy And Physiology Of The Cow, Gene H. Deutscher Jan 1980

G80-537 Reproductive Trace Anatomy And Physiology Of The Cow, Gene H. Deutscher

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Knowledge of basic reproduction will help a producer to obtain higher conception rates when using estrous synchronization and/or artificial insemination. The reproductive performance of a cow herd has a great influence on the income and profit realized. A good understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the cow's reproductive system is, therefore, beneficial for successful management. Knowledge of basic reproduction will help a producer to obtain higher conception rates when using estrous synchronization and/or artificial insemination. It will also allow for a better understanding of pregnancy examinations, reproductive diseases and calving difficulty problems.


G80-489 Feeding The Beef Cow Herd--Part I Factors Affecting The Cow Nutrition Program, Richard J. Rasby, Ivan G. Rush Jan 1980

G80-489 Feeding The Beef Cow Herd--Part I Factors Affecting The Cow Nutrition Program, Richard J. Rasby, Ivan G. Rush

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Considerations for getting the most from your beef cow herd are covered in this NebGuide, including calving season, factors affecting nutrient requirements, cow rations and more.

Feed costs are the greatest expense in keeping a cow herd, and the nutrition program dictates reproductive performance. The ultimate goal for a cow/calf manager is to keep feed costs low, but still meet the nutrient requirements of the cow herd so reproductive performance is not impaired. Once these two factors are balanced, producers, through new genetics of added growth or milk production, can match increased weaning weight with the most economical feed ...


G80-531 Swine Manure Management Systems, Elbert C. Dickey, Mike Brumm, David P. Shelton Jan 1980

G80-531 Swine Manure Management Systems, Elbert C. Dickey, Mike Brumm, David P. Shelton

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide examines the advantages and disadvantages of various types of swine manure management systems. Manure management is an integral part of any swine production system and must be carefully considered when planning new or remodeled facilities. Manure management objectives may include 1) optimum nutrient retention and utilization; 2) minimum land, labor or capital requirements; 3) odor control; 4) animal and/or human health and performance considerations; or 5) some combination of these objectives. Because of differences in land availability, climate, capital, labor and management skills among producers, a single, best management system for manure cannot be defined.


G80-509 Canada Thistle, Robert G. Wilson Jan 1980

G80-509 Canada Thistle, Robert G. Wilson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The growth and control of Canada thistle is covered here.

Canada thistle plant

Canada thistle [Cirsium arvense (L) Scop.] is a native of Eurasia and was probably introduced to America around 1750. Since that time it has spread throughout the northern part of the United States. Canada thistle is estimated to infest 800,000 acres in northern and western Nebraska.

A perennial that reproduces from seed and by an extensive root system, Canada thistle is dioecious, with the male and female flowers on separate plants. For viable seed to be produced, both male and female plants need to be present.


G80-503 Vegetable Garden Seed Storage And Germination Requirements, Dale T. Lindgren Jan 1980

G80-503 Vegetable Garden Seed Storage And Germination Requirements, Dale T. Lindgren

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide has information on the selection and storage of vegetable garden seed.

A successful garden begins with the selection and use of high quality seed of adapted superior varieties. Start by purchasing seed from a reputable seed company. Save records of your seed orders, so if you do have a complaint you can contact the sales company. Saving records of your seed orders is also useful for keeping track of the varieties you planted.


G80-496 Tomatoes In The Home Garden, Laurie Hodges, Dale T. Lindgren, Susan Schoneweis Jan 1980

G80-496 Tomatoes In The Home Garden, Laurie Hodges, Dale T. Lindgren, Susan Schoneweis

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide outlines tomato rearing practices, cultivars and possible pest, disease and weed control problems.

Tomatoes come in a wide range of fruit colors, sizes, shapes and maturities. Ripe tomatoes may be red, yellow, orange, pink or even green. Shapes vary from globe or round to slightly flattened, pear-like or cherry-sized. Often consumers complain tomatoes purchased in grocery stores are lacking in flavor or have tough skin. In a home garden, you can grow the tomatoes you prefer, including a wide selection of fruit colors, flavors, textures and sizes. Although rumored, there is no direct link between fruit acidity and ...


G80-536 Reproductive Trace Anatomy And Physiology Of The Bull, Gene H. Deutscher Jan 1980

G80-536 Reproductive Trace Anatomy And Physiology Of The Bull, Gene H. Deutscher

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Understanding the anatomy and physiology of the bull's reproductive tract is beneficial for proper management. Good reproductive performance of a bull is necessary to obtain a high percent calf crop. A bull must be fertile and capable of servicing a large number of cows during a short breeding season for optimum production. Understanding the anatomy and physiology of the bull's reproductive tract is beneficial for proper management. A basic knowledge of the reproductive system will also help the producer to understand fertility examinations, reproductive problems and breeding impairments.


G80-495 Managing Two-Year-Old Beef Heifers (Calving - Rebreeding), Gene H. Deutscher Jan 1980

G80-495 Managing Two-Year-Old Beef Heifers (Calving - Rebreeding), Gene H. Deutscher

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the nutrition and management practices recommended for beef heifers during precalving, calving, and early lactation periods. Proper development of replacement heifers has a great influence on the success of calving and rebreeding them as two-year-olds. NebGuide G80-493, Developing Replacement Beef Heifers (Weaning-Breeding), points out that proper selection, adequate nutrition, and judgment in sire selection are all important management factors for developing heifers into high producing cows. With good management before breeding, a high percentage of heifers should be bred early in a short breeding season. Heifers should be pregnancy checked and the open ones culled. Thereafter, the ...


G80-493 Developing Replacement Beef Heifers (Weaning-Breeding), Gene H. Deutscher Jan 1980

G80-493 Developing Replacement Beef Heifers (Weaning-Breeding), Gene H. Deutscher

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the proper selection, nutrition, breeding, and management of replacement beef heifers from weaning to breeding. Proper selection and development of replacement heifers is one of the most important management programs in beef production. Replacement heifers should be selected and managed so they will conceive and calve early in the calving season, provide adequate milk production, and rebreed and calve every 365 days. Heifers bred as yearlings to calve as two-year-olds will produce an extra calf in their lifetime compared to heifers calving as three-year-olds, without detrimental effects on mature size, milk production, or calf weaning weights. The ...


G80-518 Factors In Marketing Corn, W. Duane Foote Jan 1980

G80-518 Factors In Marketing Corn, W. Duane Foote

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses grain standards for corn and how they effect the value of corn.

Grading standards have been established for corn, wheat, barley, oats, rye, sorghum, flax seed, soybeans, triticale, and mixed grain. Grade requirements are designed to describe grain and provide the foundation for pricing. Within a defined range, grain standards inform buyers and sellers about the general characteristics of the grain being graded. Thus, a uniform system of grading is essential for the orderly marketing of grain.


G80-505 Economics Of Energy Used In Fallow Systems For Winter Wheat-Fallow Rotation, Robert E.J. Retzlaff, Vernon L. Hofman Jan 1980

G80-505 Economics Of Energy Used In Fallow Systems For Winter Wheat-Fallow Rotation, Robert E.J. Retzlaff, Vernon L. Hofman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the economic advantages of using a fallow system with winter wheat.

In 1979, Americans watched gasoline, diesel, and other petroleum products dramatically increase in price. The amount of imported crude oil increased and the demand continued strong despite higher prices. Conservation of energy, either forced or voluntary, seems to be one of the key solutions to the energy crisis.