Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Series

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Farm management

Agriculture

Articles 1 - 30 of 31

Full-Text Articles in Education

G03-1486 Agricultural Land Ownership And Tenure Patterns In Nebraska, Bruce Johnson Jan 2003

G03-1486 Agricultural Land Ownership And Tenure Patterns In Nebraska, Bruce Johnson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Agricultural land in Nebraska is a significant asset of wealth and a key economic input into the state's economy. It is no mere coincidence that Nebraska consistently ranks fourth among the 50 states in total cash receipts from farm marketings while also ranking fourth in land acreage in farms and third in terms of irrigated acreage.

This NebGuide provides an overview and an intepretation of land ownership and tenure patterns in Nebraska.


G03-1486 Agricultural Land Ownership And Tenure Patterns In Nebraska, Bruce B. Johnson Jan 2003

G03-1486 Agricultural Land Ownership And Tenure Patterns In Nebraska, Bruce B. Johnson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Agricultural land in Nebraska is a significant asset of wealth and a key economic input into the state's economy. It is no mere coincidence that Nebraska consistently ranks fourth among the 50 states in total cash receipts from farm marketings while also ranking fourth in land acreage in farms and third in terms of irrigation acreage.

This NebGuide provides an overview and an interpretation of land ownership and tenure patterns in Nebraska.


Ec01-872 Nebraska Crop Budgets 2001, Roger Selley, Tina N. Barrett, Richard T. Clark, Robert N. Klein, Steve Melvin Jan 2001

Ec01-872 Nebraska Crop Budgets 2001, Roger Selley, Tina N. Barrett, Richard T. Clark, Robert N. Klein, Steve Melvin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The 2001 Crop Budgets contains a list of representative field operations and materials that provides a reminder of items typically invovled in producing the crop. The budgets are presented in a worksheet format with a "Your Estimate" column for recording modifications in costs.

This publication covers the following crops: Forages -- alfalfa, annual hay, corn silage, grass, grass hay, and pasture. Grain -- corn, dry beans, grain sorghum, proso millet, oats, soybeans, sugar beets, sunflower, wheat.


Cc01-371 Estimated Irrigation Costs, 2001, Roger Selley Jan 2001

Cc01-371 Estimated Irrigation Costs, 2001, Roger Selley

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This extension circular consists of a series of tables to help the operator estimate irrigation costs for the year 2001. Costs were calculated at four well depths for a gravity system which has an output of 1,000 gpm and irrigates 100 acres.

Irrigation costs were estimated with the aid of the Irrigation System Cost Analysis computer program. Energy prices used in the cost computations are those which were expected to occur in 2001. Irrigation equipment and well drilling costs were collected by a telephone survey from selected dealers. These costs do not include sales tax, personal property tax, insurnace ...


Nf99-403 Livestock Waste Management Act (Revised March 2001), J. David Aiken Jan 1999

Nf99-403 Livestock Waste Management Act (Revised March 2001), J. David Aiken

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The Livestock Waste Management Act requires all livestock operations with 300 animal units or more to be inspected by the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to determine whether livestock wastes contaminate surface or ground water. This NebFact discusses the following parts of the Livestock Waste Management Act: Act (how cited); Terms (defined); Livestock operation, exemption, livestock waste control facility, permit, restriction; Construction permit or operating permit (when required), livestock waste control facilities, classification, restrictions; Section (how construed); Cold water class A streams (designation); Permit (acknowledgment required); Livestock operation (request inspection, when, fees, department, duties); Permits (duration, modification); Permit (application ...


Rp979-56 Long-Term Installment Land Contracts, Robert Gardner, Myron P. Kelsey, Philip E. Harris Jan 1997

Rp979-56 Long-Term Installment Land Contracts, Robert Gardner, Myron P. Kelsey, Philip E. Harris

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The installment land contract is both an instrument of transfer and a method of financing sales of land. If properly drawn, it can have a number of advantages for both the buyer and seller. Both parties should contact their attorneys to be sure that the terms of the contract are clearly stated and understood.

This research publication discusses how long-term installment land contracts are used in the agricultural community.


Nf96-288 Using Life Insurance In Farm And Ranch Estate Planning, Paul H. Gessaman Jan 1996

Nf96-288 Using Life Insurance In Farm And Ranch Estate Planning, Paul H. Gessaman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact contains information on using life insurance in estate planning.


G75-207 1994 Nebraska Farm Custom Rates - Part I (Revised August 1994), Raymond E. Massey Jan 1994

G75-207 1994 Nebraska Farm Custom Rates - Part I (Revised August 1994), Raymond E. Massey

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

A survey of producers and custom operators was conducted in the spring of 1994 to collect rates the respondents expected to prevail for custom work done in 1994. Only rates for spring and summer practices were requested.

This NebGuide reports common custom rate charges in 1994.


G75-249 1994 Nebraska Farm Custom Rates - Part Ii (Revised February 1995), Raymond E. Massey Jan 1994

G75-249 1994 Nebraska Farm Custom Rates - Part Ii (Revised February 1995), Raymond E. Massey

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

A survey of producers and custom machine operators was conducted in fall 1994 to determine the rates being charged for many late summer and fall farm machine practices.

This NebGuide defines custom rates and reports common charges in 1994.


Ec94-852 Cash Flow Planning Form, Larry L. Bitney, James Friesen Jan 1994

Ec94-852 Cash Flow Planning Form, Larry L. Bitney, James Friesen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This extension circular covers the following areas of a cash flow planning form: Beginning Cash Balance, Operating Sales (crop and hay, market livestock, livestock product, custom work); Capital Sales (breeding livestock, machinery and equipment); Personal Income (wages, interest); Operating Expenses (car/truck, chemicals, conservation, custom hire, feed purchased, fertilizers and lime, freight and trucking, gasoline, fuel and oil, insurance, labor hired, rents and leases, repairs and maintenance, seeds and plants, storage, warehousing, supplies, taxes, utilities, veterinary, breeding fees and medicine, feeder livestock); Capital Purchases (breeding livestock, machinery and equipment, family living withdrawals, personal investments, income and social security, term loan ...


G91-1059 Point-And-Figure Analysis, Robin R. Riley, Lynn H. Lutgen Jan 1991

G91-1059 Point-And-Figure Analysis, Robin R. Riley, Lynn H. Lutgen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This is the ninth and final NebGuide providing an overview for producers using technical analysis in marketing decisions. It covers point-and-figure analysis.

The point-and-figure chart is one kind of chart commonly used by people tracking prices in the futures market.

To construct this type of chart you need graph paper, a pencil, price information, and a little time to learn the technique. Charting services also offer point-and-figure charts for a fee.


G91-1058 Using The Rsi And Other Oscillators To Analyze The Markete, Robin R. Riley, Lynn H. Lutgen Jan 1991

G91-1058 Using The Rsi And Other Oscillators To Analyze The Markete, Robin R. Riley, Lynn H. Lutgen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This eighth of nine NebGuides on effective use of technical indicators in market analysis explains Relative Strength Index (RSI) and Stochastic oscillators.

Stochastic oscillators are called oscillators because they form a band across the bottom of a chart with a line that moves, or oscillates, above and below a midpoint.


G91-1031 How To Hire A Crop Consultant, J. F. Witkowski, Charles A. Shapiro, William L. Kranz, Robert J. Wright Jan 1991

G91-1031 How To Hire A Crop Consultant, J. F. Witkowski, Charles A. Shapiro, William L. Kranz, Robert J. Wright

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide reviews factors to consider when choosing a crop consultant. Efficient management of a profitable crop production system includes estimating pest populations, determining fertilizer needs, and, in the case of irrigation, monitoring soil/water conditions. Decisions regarding pest management should include information from recurring field visits that estimate pest populations, potential plant damage and crop growth. Regular visits to the field are necessary to monitor soil/water conditions by the use of soil probes, soil moisture blocks, tensiometers, or other methods to assure efficient application and use of irrigation water.


Ec89-119 Hail Damage Assessment And Replant Decisions, Charles A. Shapiro, Timothy A. Powell Jan 1989

Ec89-119 Hail Damage Assessment And Replant Decisions, Charles A. Shapiro, Timothy A. Powell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Hail is one of the many hazards that can damage a growing crop. Early in the growing season a producer has the option to replant a field seriously damaged by hail. The question is, how do you decide if it is worthwhile to replant, and what information do you need to make an informed decision? Factors to consider when deciding to replant are the expected yield reduction due to hail, the cost of replanting, and the yield potential of the replanted crop. Other information needed to make a rational decision is included in this publication, and several examples are given.


G86-771 Evaluating Options Vs. Futures Contracts, Lynn H. Lutgen Jan 1986

G86-771 Evaluating Options Vs. Futures Contracts, Lynn H. Lutgen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This is number four in a series of six NebGuides on agricultural options. It explains how to evaluate options vs futures contracts.

Options and futures contracts are similar. Both represent actions that occur in the future. Futures markets are contracts to either accept or deliver the actual physical commodity, while an option contract is a contract on the underlying futures contract. Options contracts give the farmer the right, but not the obligation, to buy or sell an underlying commodity. This underlying commodity is a futures contract. Due to these similarities and the fact that options are based on a futures ...


G86-772 Using Options To Follow A Rising Market, Lynn H. Lutgen Jan 1986

G86-772 Using Options To Follow A Rising Market, Lynn H. Lutgen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This is number five in a series of six NebGuides on Agricultural Options. It discusses how to use the options market effectively to protect us from our own emotions.

An interesting aspect of marketing is psychological. Many people make a mental decision to market grain when a specific price is reached. However, when the market begins to trend upward and hits that imaginary price level, the farmer previously facing low prices is 1) optimistic for even higher prices, and 2) wants to obtain the highest possible price to offset losses incurred during low prices. What generally happens is 1) no ...


G85-770 An Introduction To Grain Options On Futures Contracts, Lynn H. Lutgen, Lynne A. Todd Jan 1985

G85-770 An Introduction To Grain Options On Futures Contracts, Lynn H. Lutgen, Lynne A. Todd

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication, the third of six NebGuides on agricultural grain options, explains how to use futures options as a marketing tool.

A new agricultural marketing tool is available to farmers. A futures agricultural option is much like an insurance policy. It is a marketing alternative that gives farmers insurance against unfavorable price moves, but allows producers to take advantage of favorable price moves. To better understand terms used in this paper, please see NebGuide G85-768, Basic Terminology For Understanding Grain Options.


G85-769 Options Contract Specifications On Grain Futures Contracts, Lynn H. Lutgen, Lynne A. Todd Jan 1985

G85-769 Options Contract Specifications On Grain Futures Contracts, Lynn H. Lutgen, Lynne A. Todd

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication, the second of six NebGuides on agricultural grain options, explains specifications and uses of futures contracts for corn and soybean trading.

Before using options on agricultural futures contracts, it is essential to understand what constitutes an options contract.

This publication outlines contract specifications of corn and soybean options on corresponding futures contracts presently traded at the Chicago Board of Trade (CBT).

All contract specifications are discussed including: price quotations, maximum and minimum price fluctuation figures, and last trading day for an option. How strike prices and premium values are determined in relation to futures contract prices also will ...


G85-768 Basic Terminology For Understanding Grain Options, Lynn H. Lutgen Jan 1985

G85-768 Basic Terminology For Understanding Grain Options, Lynn H. Lutgen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication, the first of six NebGuides on agricultural grain options, defines many of the terms commonly used in futures trading.

In order to properly understand examples and literature on options trading, it is imperative the reader understand the terminology used in trading grain options. The following list also includes terms commonly used in futures trading. These terms are included because the option is traded on an underlying futures contract position. It is an option on the futures market, not on the physical commodity itself. Therefore, a producer also needs a basic understanding of the futures market.


G84-726 Delivering Slaughter Steerse On A Live Cattle Futures Contract, Allen C. Wellman Jan 1984

G84-726 Delivering Slaughter Steerse On A Live Cattle Futures Contract, Allen C. Wellman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses how to estimate when it might be profitable to deliver on a live cattle futures contract and outlines delivery costs and procedures.

Although most hedgers do not actually make delivery on a live cattle futures contract, the threat of delivery is an important feature of the futures market. A producer who hedges using the futures market normally offsets the futures position by buying back a futures contract and selling the slaughter cattle on the cash market.

However, there are times when it is advantageous to actually deliver on the contract. Actual delivery should be made only when ...


G82-591 Bushel Rents For Nebraska Cropland, H. Douglas Jose Jan 1982

G82-591 Bushel Rents For Nebraska Cropland, H. Douglas Jose

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The purpose of this NebGuide is to help tenants and landowners assess bushel rents and to arrive at agreements which are economically sound and fair to both.

Crop share or cash rent arrangements have been used in most farm leases in Nebraska for many years. Recently, the bushel rent approach has gained favor in the state, especially with landowners. These rental arrangements are sometimes also called flexible cash rents or standing rents.

The purpose of this NebGuide is to help tenants and landowners assess bushel rents and to arrive at agreements which are economically sound and fair to both.


G80-518 Factors In Marketing Corn, W. Duane Foote Jan 1980

G80-518 Factors In Marketing Corn, W. Duane Foote

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses grain standards for corn and how they effect the value of corn.

Grading standards have been established for corn, wheat, barley, oats, rye, sorghum, flax seed, soybeans, triticale, and mixed grain. Grade requirements are designed to describe grain and provide the foundation for pricing. Within a defined range, grain standards inform buyers and sellers about the general characteristics of the grain being graded. Thus, a uniform system of grading is essential for the orderly marketing of grain.


G80-505 Economics Of Energy Used In Fallow Systems For Winter Wheat-Fallow Rotation, Robert E.J. Retzlaff, Vernon L. Hofman Jan 1980

G80-505 Economics Of Energy Used In Fallow Systems For Winter Wheat-Fallow Rotation, Robert E.J. Retzlaff, Vernon L. Hofman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the economic advantages of using a fallow system with winter wheat.

In 1979, Americans watched gasoline, diesel, and other petroleum products dramatically increase in price. The amount of imported crude oil increased and the demand continued strong despite higher prices. Conservation of energy, either forced or voluntary, seems to be one of the key solutions to the energy crisis.


G78-421 How To Choose An Irrigation Consultant, James R. Gilley Jan 1978

G78-421 How To Choose An Irrigation Consultant, James R. Gilley

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Presented here are some guidelines and criteria to aid in the selection process for irrigation management assistance.

The complexity of agricultural technology makes it difficult for the farmer to apply this technology on a day-by-day basis. Refinement and application of agricultural technology in the field has generally been through industrial representatives and federal and state extension programs.


G78-394 Parity Prices, Everett E. Peterson Jan 1978

G78-394 Parity Prices, Everett E. Peterson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Under the Food and Agriculture Act of 1977, parity prices are used to determine support levels for only two commodities: sugar and milk. However, interest in parity prices as goals for support prices of other farm products persists in farm policy discussion because of such use in 40 years of agricultural programs, and because the term "parity" carries connotations of equity for agriculture in relation to other economic sectors.

This NebGuide defines what is a parity price, how it is computed, and the parity ratio.


G77-339 Price Spreads For Beef And Pork, Allen C. Wellman Jan 1977

G77-339 Price Spreads For Beef And Pork, Allen C. Wellman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The price spreads for beef and pork are determined by calculating the differences between prices at three marketing levels: farm (live animals), wholesale (carcass or wholesale cuts), and retail (average of retail cuts). Three price spreads, farm-wholesale, wholesale-retail, and farm-retail can be estimated from these prices. Farm-to-retail price spreads for beef and pork represent the total marketnig charges for processing and distribution from farm gate through retail counter and are discussed in this NebGuide.


G77-381 Suggestions For Making Family Farm And Ranch Operating Agreements Work, Philip A. Henderson Jan 1977

G77-381 Suggestions For Making Family Farm And Ranch Operating Agreements Work, Philip A. Henderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Both parents and young people are interested in ways to help the younger generation get started in farming. The kinds of arrangements being used are many. No two are exactly alike. Families have different objectives; different resources are involved, and the relative contributions which involved parties make are unique to each family situation.

There are certain principles, however, that need to be recognized in every family farm or ranch operating agreement and they are discussed here in this NebGuide.


G77-367 Cost Components Of The Farm-Retail Price Spread For Beef, Allen Wellman Jan 1977

G77-367 Cost Components Of The Farm-Retail Price Spread For Beef, Allen Wellman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The farm-retail spread for beef is the difference between the retail price of 1 pound of Choice beef and the farm value of live Choice steer, less the value of the by-products (hide, tallow, etc.).

This NebGuide discusses the trends, costs and profits, problems of price spreads.


Ec77-865 Have It Your Way By Making A Will, John R. Uhrich, J. David Aiken, Philip A. Henderson Jan 1977

Ec77-865 Have It Your Way By Making A Will, John R. Uhrich, J. David Aiken, Philip A. Henderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Making a will is not the sad and gloomy picture painted by some people. Quite the contrary! A person who makes a will is creating his or her own blueprint for the future. A will, like life insurance, social security, or retirement plans, provides security and peace of mind. The person who has a will made can rest assured that property and loved ones will be taken care of precisely in the manner he or she desires. This publication presents basic information about wills, one of the most important documents a person can make or possess. This information can be ...


G77-371 Nebraska Livestock Market Outlets, Allen Wellman Jan 1977

G77-371 Nebraska Livestock Market Outlets, Allen Wellman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

These are 629 outlets in Nebraska where one or more species of livestock may be sold. This does not include special sales by breed associations and livestock shows.

This NebGuides discusses the major types of livestock market outlets which are: terminal markets, local markets, auctions, dealers and/or order buyers and slaughter plants.