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Full-Text Articles in Education

G77-355 A Guide For The Control Of Flies In Nebraska Feedlots And Dairies (Revised March 1990), John B. Campbell Jan 1977

G77-355 A Guide For The Control Of Flies In Nebraska Feedlots And Dairies (Revised March 1990), John B. Campbell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Flies, especially stable and house flies, can create serious and costly problems for feedlot and dairy operations. This publication describes several methods for control.

Several species of flies may be in confined livestock facilities during summer. The stable and house fly are the most serious pests. Blow flies also may be present if molasses is in the diet. Horn flies--small blood-feeding flies--may be present in early spring. These flies overwinter as pupae in or near manure pats in range or pasture. If cattle are not present in the grassland when horn flies emerge, they will migrate to confinement cattle. Normally ...


G77-342 Sowbugs And Pillbugs, Arthur F. Hagen Jan 1977

G77-342 Sowbugs And Pillbugs, Arthur F. Hagen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication covers the identification, life history, and control of sowbugs and pillbugs.

Homeowners working around shrubs, in the garden, or along the foundation of the house, frequently find little grayish colored bugs. They often describe them as looking like "little armadillos." What they are finding are sowbugs or pillbugs or both. These creatures are not insects, but belong to the same class of animals as crabs and shrimp.


G77-358 Artesian (Confinsed) Aquifers And Effect Of Pumping, Darryll T. Pederson, Deon D. Axthelm Jan 1977

G77-358 Artesian (Confinsed) Aquifers And Effect Of Pumping, Darryll T. Pederson, Deon D. Axthelm

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Nebraskans are concerned about declining water levels in some domestic and stock wells.

Nebraskans are concerned about declining water levels in some domestic and stock wells. Drought and irrigation well development have been major factors. Water level declines have been especially pronounced during the pumping season in places where the aquifer is artesian or confined (a confined aquifer is also referred to as an artesian aquifer). Many domestic and livestock pumps may have to be set deeper in order to yield water. In nearly all cases water levels recover rapidly when the pumping season ends. Large water-level fluctuations are normal ...


Heg77-76 Pressing Methods (Revised April 1981), Thelma Thompson Jan 1977

Heg77-76 Pressing Methods (Revised April 1981), Thelma Thompson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses pressing methods that will not mar or distort the fabric.

A skillful job of pressing requires time, practice and the use of methods that will not mar the fabric. Pressing should not make the fabric shine, flatten the pile or nap, or distort the texture or weave.

Pressing is not ironing. In ironing, the iron is pushed from one spot to another in an unbroken motion to remove wrinkles. In pressing, the iron is lifted up and set down in a particular spot to flatten or shape small areas. To prevent the fabric from stretching, do not ...


G77-328 Irrigation Water Quality Criteria, Gary W. Hergert, Delno Knudsen Jan 1977

G77-328 Irrigation Water Quality Criteria, Gary W. Hergert, Delno Knudsen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide is intended to provide guidelines to help understand and interpret chemical water quality test results.

All well and stream waters contain dissolved minerals. The amounts and kinds of minerals vary from one location to another and may vary with time. When irrigation water is applied, the mineral salts are left in the soil after the crop has used the water. Most of these mineral salts are beneficial to crop growth and soil condition, but in some cases they may be harmful. Irrigation water quality problems may be caused by (1) total mineral salts accumulating so that crops no ...


G76-279 Processing Deer, Glenn W. Froning, P. S. Gipson Jan 1976

G76-279 Processing Deer, Glenn W. Froning, P. S. Gipson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

It is important to process game properly to obtain maximum flavor and storage stability.

It is a pleasure to hunt game, but perhaps an even greater satisfaction comes from eating the meat. In order to have a flavorful experience, the game animal must be handled, processed and prepared properly. If the game is improperly processed or handled, one may lose much of the desirable flavor and storage stability.


G76-315 Establishing Black Walnut, Rick Hamilton, Neal E. Jennings Jan 1976

G76-315 Establishing Black Walnut, Rick Hamilton, Neal E. Jennings

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication contains information on establishing a black walnut plantation.

Based on current market conditions, $20,000 to $30,000 worth of black walnut timber can be harvested from a managed acre within 50 years. The total cost of establishing an acre rarely exceeds $100, including site preparation, cost of seedlings, planting, and weed control. The decision to invest in a walnut plantation can be based on:

1. The rate of return on $100 per acre invested is 11.3 percent to 11.9 percent, yielding $20,000 to $30,000 within 50 years. The same investment at 6 percent ...


Ec76-1741 Christmas Trees: A Management Guide, Donald E. Janssen, Neal E. Jennings Jan 1976

Ec76-1741 Christmas Trees: A Management Guide, Donald E. Janssen, Neal E. Jennings

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

In America the decorated Christmas tree has become an accepted tradition. Christmas would seem barren to most people without it. Raising Christmas trees is a growing industry and has proven to be a profitable use of land if high-quality, salable trees are produced.

Planting, managing, and harvesting Christmas trees is a high labor, high risk endeavor. Here is a list of questions. If you can answer "yes" to every one, you will be a successful Christmas tree grower.

Are you willing to plant trees every April?

Are you willing to shear or prune every tree, every year (mid-June to mid-July ...


G76-314 Native Wood Fence Posts (Revised February 1990), Thomas L. Schmidt, Michael R. Kuhns Jan 1976

G76-314 Native Wood Fence Posts (Revised February 1990), Thomas L. Schmidt, Michael R. Kuhns

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This guide evaluates native Nebraska tree species for use as wooden fence posts.

Fencing is a major part of most farming and ranching operations. Fences are costly and require regular repair and maintenance. Wood fence posts cut from native Nebraska trees can be less expensive than steel posts or wood posts imported from other states. When deciding whether to use native wood fence posts, consider durability, availability and ease of handling.


G76-284 Hand Signals For Agriculture, Rollin D. Schnieder Jan 1976

G76-284 Hand Signals For Agriculture, Rollin D. Schnieder

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide contains hand signals useful for communicating around noisy equipment and from a distance.

Throughout history, man has devised methods of contacting others who were out of voice range or who could not be heard because of excess noise. The Indians were skilled at using smoke signals or by imitating some form of wildlife such as the owl or coyote.

The early explorers used other signs to guide them. The slashing of bark on trees or sticks pointed in a certain direction were keys for keeping the persons from getting lost or for others to follow.

The railroad used ...


Heg76-36 Sewing With Plaids (Revised January 1987), Rose Marie Tondl Jan 1976

Heg76-36 Sewing With Plaids (Revised January 1987), Rose Marie Tondl

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide contains useful suggestions for sewing with plaids.

Plaids remain popular and have no season. They can create dramatic effects, be dainty, gay, subtle or forceful. Their coloring may be rich, subdued or bizarre, depending upon the spacing combination and intensity of colors. Whatever the desired effect, perfection in matching plaids can make an inexpensive dress look expensive.


Heg76-42 Wool And Wool Blends (Revised January 1985), Rose Marie Tondl Jan 1976

Heg76-42 Wool And Wool Blends (Revised January 1985), Rose Marie Tondl

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide contains information about buying and sewing wool and wool blends.

Wool is a unique fiber. It is a natural fiber made from the fleece of sheep. Wool fabrics are not all alike. They come in a variety of textures and weights. Wool can be sheer, thin, soft, thick, stiff or anything in between. Wool fabrics are constructed by weaving, knitting or felting.


G75-237 Boxelder Bugs (Revised June 1992), Frederick P. Baxendale, David L. Keith Jan 1975

G75-237 Boxelder Bugs (Revised June 1992), Frederick P. Baxendale, David L. Keith

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the importance, life history and control of boxelder bugs.

Description

Boxelder bug adults are about 1/2 inch long. They are slate-gray with three red lines behind the head and red lines on the wings. The rear half of the wings have a reddish margin and the abdomen under the wings is also red. Nymphs (young bugs) are bright red with darker heads. They resemble adults, but their wings do not fully develop until they reach maturity.


G74-182 Caring For African Violets, Don Steinegger, John E. Watkins, Anne Vidaver, Frederick P. Baxendale Jan 1974

G74-182 Caring For African Violets, Don Steinegger, John E. Watkins, Anne Vidaver, Frederick P. Baxendale

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

African violets are low, compact plants with attractive dark green, thick, hairy leaves. This NebGuide covers various aspects of caring for them.

The African violet (Saintpaulia ionantha) is one of the most satisfactory flowering houseplants. It is a low, compact plant with attractive dark green, thick, hairy leaves. The violet-like flowers are borne in small panicles just above the foliage. Besides various shades of blue-violet, there are also pink, fuschia, and white cultivars (varieties). Newer violets include not only cultivars with single flowers, but also those with semi-double or double rows of petals. Bi-colored flowers and those with a contrasting ...


G74-165 Understand Your Soil Test: Calcium, Magnesium, Boron, Copper, Chlorine, Molybdenum, Delno Knudsen, K.D. Frank Jan 1974

G74-165 Understand Your Soil Test: Calcium, Magnesium, Boron, Copper, Chlorine, Molybdenum, Delno Knudsen, K.D. Frank

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

It is possible to analyze soil samples for any of the 13 essential elements which plants obtain from the soil. This does not mean that the results obtained can be used to predict adequacy or deficiency for plant growth.

The value obtained from any chemical procedure used to determine each element must be shown to be related to (1) crop response from application of that element (correlation) and (2) the soil test level at which response occurs (calibration). Crop response is usually measured as yield, but may also be a quality factor. Field plot and greenhouse research are used to ...


G74-142 Harvesting And Preserving Hay Crop Silage, Rick Grant, Rick Stock Jan 1974

G74-142 Harvesting And Preserving Hay Crop Silage, Rick Grant, Rick Stock

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes principles of successful hay crop harvest, silage preservation, management techniques to obtain high quality hay crop silage, and proper use of silage storage facilities.

Most hay (legume and grass) crops can be ensiled, or made into silage, successfully. For best feeding value and preservation, consider the special requirements for ensiling each crop.

Hays to be ensiled should be selected on the basis of economics. Which are the most profitable for supplying nutrients? For example, legumes have a relatively higher value for dairy herds than for beef finishing operations because of dairy cows' higher requirement for protein.


G74-187 Care Of Cactus In The Home, Dale T. Lindgren Jan 1974

G74-187 Care Of Cactus In The Home, Dale T. Lindgren

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The care and propagation of cacti is featured in this NebGuide. A special section on Christmas cactus is included.

Cacti are among the most fascinating groups of indoor plants. Often described as arid desert plants, they also are found in forests and on prairies. In Nebraska several native species of cactus intermingle with prairie grasses.


G74-186 Cannas, Donald E. Janssen, Don Steinegger Jan 1974

G74-186 Cannas, Donald E. Janssen, Don Steinegger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Cannas are quick growing, vigorous ornamental plants with heavy foliage and large flowers.

Flower colors range from dark red to light green. Leaf colors can be reddish-purple, bronze or green. They are used most effectively for bedding plants in public parks and larger home grounds where they can be planted in front of taller shrubbery and viewed from a distance. Their vigor and size make them less desirable for planting in restricted areas.


G74-189 Growing Dahlias, Don Steinegger, John E. Watkins, Frederick P. Baxendale Jan 1974

G74-189 Growing Dahlias, Don Steinegger, John E. Watkins, Frederick P. Baxendale

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Propagation, culture, diseases, and insects of dahlias are covered here.

The dahlia is a versatile flowering plant, providing a wide array of sizes, forms and colors. Flowers range from half-inch pompons to giants. Flower forms vary from daisy-shaped singles to fully double types with intermediate forms, such as anemone.

Dahlia cultivars which flower the first year from seed are referred to as annuals. Many of these annuals form tuberous roots the first year. These tuberous roots can be saved for use next year.


G74-188 Amaryllis Culture, Don Steinegger, John E. Watkins Jan 1974

G74-188 Amaryllis Culture, Don Steinegger, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The hybrid amaryllis (Hippeastrum) is a tender bulb easily grown in pots. Amaryllis is prized for its huge showy flowers ranging from scarlet or crimson to white in color, and often striped or mottled.

Amaryllis can be grown outdoors throughout the year in mild climates, but must be grown indoors in Nebraska except during the warm summer months. Amaryllis is prized for its huge showy flowers ranging from scarlet or crimson to white in color, and often striped or mottled. Most amaryllis are Dutch or African hybrids selected for flower size, color and ease of forcing. The usual flowering season ...


G74-202 Wheat Soil-Borne Mosaic Disease (Revised October 2001), John E. Watkins Jan 1974

G74-202 Wheat Soil-Borne Mosaic Disease (Revised October 2001), John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Host range, symptoms, disease cycle, and control options for wheat soil-borne mosaic disease are discussed.

Wheat soil-borne mosaic virus affects wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) growing primarily in central, eastern and west central Nebraska. This disease occurs annually; however, its effect on crop production in Nebraska varies from year to year due to variety selection, cropping practices and environmental conditions favoring disease development. In years when spring temperatures remain cool for extended periods, the virus remains active in infected plants, enhancing symptom development and increasing yield loss. The virus reduces tillering and affects kernel weights and test weights.


G74-108 Wilts Of Cucurbits (Revised October 1994), James R. Steadman, David L. Keith, Laurie Hodges Jan 1974

G74-108 Wilts Of Cucurbits (Revised October 1994), James R. Steadman, David L. Keith, Laurie Hodges

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Discussion covers the symptoms, disease cycles, and control measures for bacterial and Fusarium wilts of cucurbits, including cucumbers, cantaloupe, watermelons, squash, and pumpkins. Wilt caused by squash vine borer also is covered.


G74-113 A Quick Test For Atrazine Carryover (Revised March 1989), Alex Martin, R.N. Stougaard, Patrick J. Shea Jan 1974

G74-113 A Quick Test For Atrazine Carryover (Revised March 1989), Alex Martin, R.N. Stougaard, Patrick J. Shea

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

How can you tell if you have atrazine carryover in your fields? Plants grown in soil samples can tell.

Residues of atrazine may remain in the soil and affect some susceptible crops the next year. Crops most often affected include soybeans, field beans, sugarbeets, alfalfa, oats, wheat and many broadleaf horticultural crops.

Attempts to predict the extent of carryover and damage to sensitive crops the year following atrazine use have been only partially successful. The rate of atrazine disappearance and, therefore, the amount remaining the next year, is affected by soil texture, pH and organic matter content, as well as ...


G73-4 Bagworms (Revised June 1987), Frederick P. Baxendale Jan 1973

G73-4 Bagworms (Revised June 1987), Frederick P. Baxendale

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Bagworms can damage juniper, arborvitae, pine, and spruce. Description, life history, and control are discussed in this publication.

The bagworm is native to the United States and is found in eastern Nebraska. Bagworms feed on many species of trees and shrubs, but are most common on junipers. They are rarely a serious problem on deciduous trees, except when larvae move away from evergreens.


G73-60 Working With Wood I. Home Drying Lumber (Revised July 1987), Michael Kuhns, Richard Straight Jan 1973

G73-60 Working With Wood I. Home Drying Lumber (Revised July 1987), Michael Kuhns, Richard Straight

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Avoid the expense of kiln-dried lumber by processing and drying your own lumber at home.

Anyone who has done much woodworking knows how expensive high quality, kiln-dried, hardwood lumber can be. Even kiln-dried construction lumber is expensive. Besides expense, there also may be problems with finding certain species of wood, highly figured wood, or hardwood boards thicker than one inch (4/4).

One way to avoid these problems is to dry your own lumber. Green, unsurfaced, or unplaned lumber can be obtained from many small sawmills in Nebraska and surrounding states. You may also want to obtain your own logs ...


G73-45 Managing Black Walnut Plantations For Timber (Revised March 1979), Neal E. Jennings, Frank A. Hershey Jan 1973

G73-45 Managing Black Walnut Plantations For Timber (Revised March 1979), Neal E. Jennings, Frank A. Hershey

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

A basic knowledge of tree needs and the application of simple management principles are required to produce quality black walnut timber.

Black walnut (Juglans nigra) is a high value timber species. The only way to maximize profit from black walnut plantations is by good timber management. Management practices that increase growth, improve quality and reduce damage, substantially increase profit. A basic knowledge of tree needs and the application of simple management principles are required to produce quality black walnut timber.

Protection, pruning and thinning are the major management activities.


G73-73 Sweet Potatoes (Revised June 1992), R.E. Neild, Laurie Hodges Jan 1973

G73-73 Sweet Potatoes (Revised June 1992), R.E. Neild, Laurie Hodges

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Varieties, requirements and culture, harvesting and storage of sweet potatoes.

The sweet potato, a member of the morning glory plant family, is native to tropical America. It is an important food plant in warmer regions of the world and is adapted to southeastern Nebraska. Sweet potatoes may be boiled, baked, fried, or candied. They have high food value. Varieties with deeply yellow colored roots are a good source of vitamin A.


G73-71 Lettuce (Revised April 1990), R.E. Neild, Roger D. Uhlinger Jan 1973

G73-71 Lettuce (Revised April 1990), R.E. Neild, Roger D. Uhlinger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Successfully growing and harvesting lettuce is the focus of this NebGuide.

Lettuce is an increasingly popular vegetable in the United States. Because it is a basic ingredient in salads, lettuce is eaten more frequently than any other vegetable. Lettuce can be served alone with a variety of dressings or mixed with other fresh vegetables.

Its fresh color and crisp texture serve well as a garnish, and its leaves may be stuffed with fruit, cheese, seafood, poultry, ham, or egg salads. Although usually consumed fresh, leaf lettuce and chopped green onions "wilted" with warm vegetable oil and vinegar make a pleasing ...


G73-46 Hessian Fly On Wheat, John E. Foster, Gary L. Hein Jan 1973

G73-46 Hessian Fly On Wheat, John E. Foster, Gary L. Hein

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the life cycle, control and prevention of the Hessian fly. Plant-safe dates and resistant wheat varieties are also examined.

The Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say), is not native to the United States, but was probably introduced by Hessian soldiers during the Revolutionary War. This insect was given its common name by Americans because of its damage on Long Island in 1779. The pest has become distributed throughout the United States wheat production areas since then.

The Hessian fly belongs to the family of insects known as gall midges (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), a group noted for their habit of ...


G73-12 Iris Borer Control, David L. Keith, Frederick P. Baxendale Jan 1973

G73-12 Iris Borer Control, David L. Keith, Frederick P. Baxendale

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Scouting, prevention and control of the iris borer.

This insect is the most serious insect pest of iris in Nebraska and is found virtually everywhere in the state. Damage is characterized by dark, streaked, or watery areas and ragged edges on the developing leaves of iris in May and June and extensive destruction of the insides of the rhizomes in July and early August. Examination late in summer will reveal a large white to pinkish caterpillar from 1 1/2 to 2 inches long in the rhizome, usually accompanied by a foul-smelling soft rot.