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Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Animal diseases

Articles 1 - 19 of 19

Full-Text Articles in Education

Nf04-598 Rabies In Nebraska, Annette K. Bredthauer, David R. Smith Jan 2004

Nf04-598 Rabies In Nebraska, Annette K. Bredthauer, David R. Smith

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Rabies is a deadly virus infection that can attack the central nervous system of most warm blooded animals, including humans. Rabies is a very old disease. The first recorded description of the disease dates from the 23rd century BC in Babylon. It was rampant in Europe in the 19th century and was carried to the Americas by animals on the early ships.

This NebFact describes rabies in animals and explains how people can protect themselves, as well as their pets or livestock from rabies exposure.


G96-1286 Porcine Reproductive And Respiratory Syndrome (Prrs) Virus, Angela Baysinger, V. L. Cooper Jan 1996

G96-1286 Porcine Reproductive And Respiratory Syndrome (Prrs) Virus, Angela Baysinger, V. L. Cooper

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide explains Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome--its symptoms, transmission and diagnosis; and it discusses methods of prevention, management and control.

History

Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) was first observed in 1986 in the United States and in 1990 in Europe. The syndrome was initially called Mystery Pig Disease in the United States since no known swine pathogens could be implicated. A number of titles have been used to describe this disease syndrome: swine infertility and respiratory syndrome (SIRS), porcine epidemic abortions and respiratory syndrome (PEARS), blue-eared pig disease as well as others. Since 1992, PRRS has been the ...


G95-1239 Managing To Prevent Equine Developmental Orthopedic Diseases, Kathleen P. Anderson Jan 1995

G95-1239 Managing To Prevent Equine Developmental Orthopedic Diseases, Kathleen P. Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes and discusses management techniques to prevent orthopedic disease in horses.

Equine Developmental Orthopedic Disease (DOD) is a significant problem facing today's horse breeders. A serious case of DOD can render a young horse essentially worthless due to crippling lameness. There is continuous debate as to the interplay of nutrition, management, genetics and exercise on the incidence of bone disease in young, growing horses. In the early stages, growing horses may appear unaffected by the disease, but may later develop lameness and eventually chronic arthritis. Recent research has identified many factors which will aid breeders to minimize ...


Nf94-128 Observations From Anthrax Outbreak In Sheridan County Herd, John Gamby, Roger Sahara, Dale Grotelueschen Jan 1994

Nf94-128 Observations From Anthrax Outbreak In Sheridan County Herd, John Gamby, Roger Sahara, Dale Grotelueschen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Anthrax killed 23 head of cows and calves on a Sheridan county Nebraska ranch in June 1994. Bacillus anthracis was confirmed on culture by the Panhandle Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, Scottsbluff, Nebraska and the National Veterinary Services Laboratory, Ames, Iowa. The following observations from this case are offered to veterinary practitioners encountering herds where anthrax is a part of the differential diagnosis. Please consult textbooks for specifics regarding this disease.


G94-1202 Vaccination Guide For The Small Poultry Flock, Eva Wallner-Pendleton Jan 1994

G94-1202 Vaccination Guide For The Small Poultry Flock, Eva Wallner-Pendleton

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide will help the small flock owner decide whether vaccinations might help prevent disease in the flock. Types of vaccines and methods of application are also discussed.

Vaccines are widely used by the livestock industry to prevent diseases. Commercial poultry (farms with greater than 5,000 birds) are almost universally vaccinated against a variety of diseases. Preventative vaccinations have resulted in increased health and improved production efficiency in the poultry industry.


G93-1184 Bovine Ocular Neoplasia, L. J. Perino, D. D. Griffin, D. G. Rogers Jan 1993

G93-1184 Bovine Ocular Neoplasia, L. J. Perino, D. D. Griffin, D. G. Rogers

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide will aid in the early identification and proper management of bovine ocular neoplasia, commonly known as cancer eye, including appropriate veterniary care. The common name for bovine ocular neoplasia, also known as ocular squamous cell tumors, is cancer eye. The term cancer eye is not entirely accurate and carries negative connotations. As we will explain in this NebGuide not all of these growths are cancerous. The scientific term for a cow is "bovine," the medical term for the eye is "ocular," and the medical term for these new and abnormal growths is "neoplasia." Thus, the term bovine ocular ...


G93-1148 Common Infectious Diseases That Cause Abortions In Cattle, Duane N. Rice, Douglas Rogers Jan 1993

G93-1148 Common Infectious Diseases That Cause Abortions In Cattle, Duane N. Rice, Douglas Rogers

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide briefly discusses the common infectious diseases that cause abortions in cattle. "Abortion" is the expulsion of the fetus prior to the end of the normal gestation period. Many abortions occur very early after conception and the embryos or fetuses are so small that they may not be seen. Other abortions may occur near normal calving time and it is difficult to determine whether the cow has aborted or whether a premature birth has occurred. Abortions have many causes which may include physiological problems (such as hormonal imbalances), metabolic problems, toxicoses and/or infectious diseases caused by protozoa, bacteria ...


Nf91-29 Ringworm And Club Lamb Fungus, Doyle Wolverton, Ted Doane Jan 1991

Nf91-29 Ringworm And Club Lamb Fungus, Doyle Wolverton, Ted Doane

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Sheep exhibitors, as you prepare for summer shows, examine how you prepare your sheep for the show ring. Washing and shearing removes the natural lanolin and suint that protects sheep from getting some diseases. Anyone who shows sheep this summer should be aware of ringworm and a ringworm-like disease that can be transmitted from infected sheep to humans. One ringworm type disease, caused by a fungus, is currently being called "club lamb" fungus.


G90-977 Johne's Disease (Paratuberculosis), Duane N. Rice, Douglas G. Rogers Jan 1990

G90-977 Johne's Disease (Paratuberculosis), Duane N. Rice, Douglas G. Rogers

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses paratuberculosis (a costly disease) of cattle, sheep and goats, its causes, clinical signs, transmission, diagnosis and control measures.

Johne's Disease, or paratuberculosis, is a chronic wasting disease that causes considerable production losses in adult cattle, sheep and goats. The disease is caused by Mycobacterium paratuberculosis, a bacterium related to the tuberculosis bacterium Mycobacterium bovis.

This bacterium causes an enteritis (inflamed intestinal tract) that results in severe weight loss and diarrhea. Some animals may be so emaciated (thin, dehydrated) that they are condemned at slaughter; others may suffer from reduced productivity long before clinical (visible) signs are ...


G88-864 Handling Internal Worm Parasitism In Sheep, Dale M. Grotelueschen, Don Ferguson, Ted Doane Jan 1988

G88-864 Handling Internal Worm Parasitism In Sheep, Dale M. Grotelueschen, Don Ferguson, Ted Doane

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication acquaints the reader with methods of preventing, controlling, and treating parasitism in sheep.

Introduction

Parasites or worms affecting the digestive system are a severe health problem in sheep production. The economic losses from parasitism can be extensive, ranging from mortality or death loss to weight loss, reduced weight gain, reduced wool production, decreased milk yield resulting in lower lamb weights, poor reproductive performance, and the cost of medications and handling.

Coccidiosis, another costly intestinal parasite, but not caused by worm infestation, will be discussed briefly.


G86-799 Health Management And Recommended Vaccinations For Dairy Replacements, Duane Rice, R. Gene White Jan 1986

G86-799 Health Management And Recommended Vaccinations For Dairy Replacements, Duane Rice, R. Gene White

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the importance of having a good vaccination schedule, and provides recommendations on which vaccinations to give, depending on variables. Correct management decisions are necessary to realize maximum returns on investments in any dairy operation. Dairymen sometimes assume there is a quick remedy for health problems, but the prevention of disease is by far less expensive. Preventing health problems in the dairy herd goes much further than using a veterinarian to treat individual animals with emergency problems. A veterinarian with experience and a genuine interest in dairy cattle is essential to assist the dairyman with herd health problems ...


G86-794 Enterotoxemia In Lambs, Dale M. Grotelueschen, Duane N. Rice Jan 1986

G86-794 Enterotoxemia In Lambs, Dale M. Grotelueschen, Duane N. Rice

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the causes, clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention methods of this potentially fatal disease.

Enterotoxemia, which is also known as "overeating" or "pulpy kidney" disease, is a highly significant and costly disease problem for the sheep industry. Proper preventive practices are strongly recommended to sheep producers in order to avoid death loss from this disease.

The word "enterotoxemia" can be broken down into three parts that can be an aid in understanding the disease. The term "entero" refers to intestine; "tox" refers to toxin or poison; and "emia" refers to blood. Thus, from "intestinal toxin in the ...


G86-795 Antibiotic Use In Animals, Duane N. Rice, E. Denis Erickson Jan 1986

G86-795 Antibiotic Use In Animals, Duane N. Rice, E. Denis Erickson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide provides general guidelines about some of the problems that can occur when using antibiotics in treating animals.

Antibiotics are frequently used, and misused, by animal owners in an attempt to remedy disease problems. This use is encouraged by drug company sales efforts, economic pressures, and easy access to the products.

Improper use of antibiotics is costly, detrimental, and may result in: 1) delayed diagnosis; 2) ineffectiveness; 3) toxicity (poisoning); 4) allergic reactions; and 5) drug residue contamination of food animal products.

After evaluating possible benefits and risks, determining whether or not to use antibiotics for treatment depends on ...


G85-748 Prevention And Control Of Swine Dysentery, Gerald E. Duhamel, Alex Hogg, Barbara E. Straw Jan 1985

G85-748 Prevention And Control Of Swine Dysentery, Gerald E. Duhamel, Alex Hogg, Barbara E. Straw

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes the causes and symptoms of swine dysentery and offers management recommendations and treatment procedures for its prevention and control.

Swine dysentery is a highly contagious disease of growing and finishing pigs. First described in Indiana in 1921, it has been called black scours, bloody scours, and vibrionic dysentery.

Swine dysentery causes important financial losses because of reduced feed efficiency and lower weight gain, costs of medication and additional animal care, and death. Substantial costs may result from loss of sales of breeding stock, or depopulation when necessary. Serpula (Treponema) hyodysenteriae, a spiral bacterium, is the cause of ...


G77-326 Clostridial Diseases Of Cattle (Revised September 1981), W.B. Wren, Duane N. Rice Jan 1977

G77-326 Clostridial Diseases Of Cattle (Revised September 1981), W.B. Wren, Duane N. Rice

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The Clostridial diseases are a group of frequently fatal infections caused by bacteria belonging to the group called Clostridia. These organisms have the ability to form protective shell-like forms called spores when exposed to adverse conditions. This allows them to remain potentially infective in soils for long periods of time, presenting a significant danger to the livestock population. Many of the organisms in this group are also normally present in the intestines of man and animals.

This NebGuide discusses the different clostridial diseases found in cattle.


G77-336 Coccidiosis Of Cattle, Donald L. Ferguson Jan 1977

G77-336 Coccidiosis Of Cattle, Donald L. Ferguson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide contains information on the identification, treatment, and prevention of coccidiosis in cattle.

Coccidiosis continues to be one of the major disease problems for cattle producers. It is caused by microscopic, one-celled parasites, chiefly of the genus Eimeria. Twenty-one species of Eimeria have been reported in cattle. Only two, Eimeria bovis and Eimeria zuernii, are regularly associated with clinical infections in the field.


G77-327 Acute Bovine Pulmonary Emphysema, James H. Bailey Jan 1977

G77-327 Acute Bovine Pulmonary Emphysema, James H. Bailey

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The disease, Acute Bovine Pulmonary Emphysema, has been recognized for many years and under many different names including "Pulmonary Adenomatosis," "Panters," "Lungers," "Bovine Asthma," "Fog Fever," and "Atypical Interstitial Pneumonia." It is characterized by sudden onset of acute respiratory distress with the affected animals producing an audible grunting noise when they exhale.

The cause, occurrence, clinical findings, treatment, prevention and control are covered in this NebGuide.


G75-269 Calf Scours — Causes And Treatment (Revised June 1996), Don Hudson, Dale Grotelueschen Jan 1975

G75-269 Calf Scours — Causes And Treatment (Revised June 1996), Don Hudson, Dale Grotelueschen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Calf scours or calf diarrhea cause significant financial loss to cow-calf producers.

This NebGuide discusses causes, treatment, supportive therapy, and herd management.


G74-157 Foot Rot, Don Hudson Jan 1974

G74-157 Foot Rot, Don Hudson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Foot rot (necrotic pododermatitis, foul foot) can be a very annoying problem. Once started in a herd and "seeded" in the soil, it may persist for quite a long time. Although the incidence of foot rot may not be high at any one time, it requires constant observation to prevent serious economic loss.

The bacterium Fusobacterium necrophorum has been reported to cause foot rot. However, researchers have not been able to reproduce typical foot rot lesions with this organism.

Recent research at the University of Missouri indicates that a combination of Fusobacterium necrophorum and Bacteroides melaninogenicus are the predominant bacteria ...