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Series

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

1996

Insects

Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Education

G96-1297 Buffalograss: An Alternative Native Grass For Turf (Revised October 1998), Terrance P. Riordan, Frederick P. Baxendale, Roch E. Gaussoin, John E. Watkins Jan 1996

G96-1297 Buffalograss: An Alternative Native Grass For Turf (Revised October 1998), Terrance P. Riordan, Frederick P. Baxendale, Roch E. Gaussoin, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the benefits of buffalograss turf plantings.

Buffalograss (Buchloƫ dactyloides) is a native grass species which has prospered on the Great Plains for centuries. Both cyclic and prolonged droughts have allowed it to evolve water use efficiency and sod forming ability. People are using this short, fine-leaved prairie grass as an ecologically sound and energy efficient turf.


G96-1302 Managing Varroa In The Midwest, Marion D. Ellis, Frederick P. Baxendale Jan 1996

G96-1302 Managing Varroa In The Midwest, Marion D. Ellis, Frederick P. Baxendale

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

There are important regional differences in varroa population dynamics and control. This NebGuide offers recommendations on varroa management for beekeepers in the Midwest.

Varroa management has become an essential aspect of successful beekeeping since the mite was first discovered in the United States in 1987. Unlike most parasites which coexist with their host, varroa eventually destroy honey bee colonies of European descent. A good understanding of this important bee parasite is essential for successful beekeeping.


Ec96-1768 Windbreak Management, James R. Brandle, Craig Stange Jan 1996

Ec96-1768 Windbreak Management, James R. Brandle, Craig Stange

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The windbreaks on your farm are an important part of the agricultural landscape. They provide protection for the farmstead, livestock, and crops; provide habitat for wildlife; and contribute to an overall healthy environment for you and your family. They are living systems with youth, maturity, and old age. Like any other living thing they need proper care and management in order to continue to function at their best.

Windbreak management requires an understanding of how your windbreak works. Your goal is to maintain the health and vigor of individual trees and shrubs while maintaining the overall structure of the windbreak ...


G96-1300 Insects That Feed On Corn Ears, David L. Keith, J. F. Witkowski Jan 1996

G96-1300 Insects That Feed On Corn Ears, David L. Keith, J. F. Witkowski

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

How to identify mature and immature insects that infest and damage ears of corn.

Several kinds of insects infest the developing ears of corn, raising farmers' concerns and sometimes causing economic damage. Some of these insects can reduce both yield and quality of seed corn, pop corn, sweet corn and field corn. Control decisions depend in part on the economics of the corn crop produced. In many cases, particularly in field corn where the value of the crop per acre is somewhat lower, the insects may not be sufficiently damaging to require control. The higher value of seed corn compared ...


G96-1277 Pine Moths, Mark O. Harrell, Frederick P. Baxendale, J. Ackland Jones Jan 1996

G96-1277 Pine Moths, Mark O. Harrell, Frederick P. Baxendale, J. Ackland Jones

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Pine moths can seriously damage pine trees. This NebGuide helps you recognize damage and symptoms, identify the pest, and choose a control.

Pine moths are serious pests of pines in Nebraska. Larvae (caterpillars) damage trees by tunneling just beneath the bark of the trunk and branches (Figure 1), most commonly on the trunk just below a branch. The tunnels they make can girdle the trunk or branches or physically weaken them so they are easily broken by wind or snow (Figure 2). Heavily infested trees are often deformed and are sometimes killed.


G96-1295 Scabies, Wayne L. Kramer, Donald E. Mock Jan 1996

G96-1295 Scabies, Wayne L. Kramer, Donald E. Mock

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The life cycle, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of scabies infestations in humans is addressed.

Scabies is a contagious disease of humans and other mammals. It is caused by the mite, Sarcoptes scabiei, which burrows into the dead layer of the human skin (stratum corneum). Sarcoptic mites are obligate parasites which spend most of their lives in burrows in the skin. If the mite invades a person's skin, and establishes itself, symptoms of scabies will become apparent, although it may take four to six weeks.

Scabies is transmitted from person to person by close personal and prolonged skin contact. Transmission ...


Nf96-303 Millipedes And Centipedes, David L. Keith, Frederick P. Baxendale Jan 1996

Nf96-303 Millipedes And Centipedes, David L. Keith, Frederick P. Baxendale

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact has information on millipedes and centipedes.


Nf96-269 Chiggers, Frederick P. Baxendale, Shripat T. Kamble, David L. Keith Jan 1996

Nf96-269 Chiggers, Frederick P. Baxendale, Shripat T. Kamble, David L. Keith

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact has information on chiggers.


Nf96-302 Pillbugs And Sowbugs, David L. Keith, Frederick P. Baxendale Jan 1996

Nf96-302 Pillbugs And Sowbugs, David L. Keith, Frederick P. Baxendale

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact has information on pillbugs and sowbugs.