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Full-Text Articles in Education

G86-783 Complete Rations -- Should You Feed Them?, Foster G. Owen Jan 1986

G86-783 Complete Rations -- Should You Feed Them?, Foster G. Owen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the advantages and disadvantages of feeding complete rations to dairy herds.

Using the complete ration system for feeding dairy cows has become increasingly popular. Nutritionists generally consider it the ideal method of feeding dairy cattle. Milk production per cow can be maximized, and feed and labor costs minimized, with this system. However, the necessary equipment is expensive and may be excessive for loose-housed herds of less than 100 cows.


G86-778 Do You Practice Good Milking Procedures?, Gerald R. Bodman Jan 1986

G86-778 Do You Practice Good Milking Procedures?, Gerald R. Bodman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide outlines good milking procedures to follow to assure high quality milk production while minimizing mastitis and other health problems.

Milking, or harvesting the milk crop, is a critical step between planting crops, building facilities, and paying bills on a dairy farm. While highly productive cows and a properly functioning milking system are essential, how the cows are handled and the milking system is used are equally important. Proper milking procedures are necessary to assure a bountiful harvest of high quality milk.

The nature of milk-secreting tissue and the anatomy of the udder make harvesting the milk crop impossible ...


G86-819 At What Weight Should Holstein Heifers Freshen?, Jeffrey F. Keown Jan 1986

G86-819 At What Weight Should Holstein Heifers Freshen?, Jeffrey F. Keown

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This guide offers research findings on the appro-priate weights for Holstein heifer freshening and sug-gests producers be aware of economic considerations involved in heifer freshening.

Most producers realize that the weight of a heifer at freshening affects the amount of milk produced during the first lactation. Heifers not fed balanced nutritional diets before freshening will not produce at an optimum level since they do not have the body reserves to maintain peak produc-tion. Likewise, a heifer that freshens very heavy will not pro-duce as much as she should because she is too heavy. There must be a break-even point at ...


G86-818 How To Use The Milk Progesterone Tests, Larry L. Larson Jan 1986

G86-818 How To Use The Milk Progesterone Tests, Larry L. Larson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This guide discusses the basis for milk progesterone tests, using the test to confirm estrus, as an early indicator of pregnancy, and the availability and costs of kits. Milk progesterone test kits are now commercially available for on-farm use. Correct interpretation of the test results requires accurate estrous detection and good records. Properly used, these tests can help determine (1) if a cow is near estrus and potentially could conceive if bred, or (2) as an early indicator of pregnancy.


G86-820 How To Maximize Income By Managing Days Dry, Jeffrey F. Keown Jan 1986

G86-820 How To Maximize Income By Managing Days Dry, Jeffrey F. Keown

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This guide discusses the benefits of maintaining the optimum calving interval and offers suggestions for accomplishing this reproductive management technique.

Most dairy producers are aware that an optimum calving interval is 365 days. This is a normal lactation length of 305 days with a dry period of 60 days. This interval is often looked at as a goal to strive toward rather than a goal that must be reached to maximize income from the sale of milk.


G86-822 How To Estimate A Dairy Herd's Reproductive Losses, Jeffrey F. Keown Jan 1986

G86-822 How To Estimate A Dairy Herd's Reproductive Losses, Jeffrey F. Keown

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Remedies for herd losses caused by calving interval, dry periods, A.I. performance, and age at first freshening.

One of the major areas of lost income to the dairy producer is in the reproductive performance of the dairy herd. These losses are often overlooked because they are indirect costs. If producers could be given a monthly bill indicating the amount of money that improper reproductive management has cost them, then drastic changes would occur.

The majority of reproductive losses occur in the following areas:

1. Calving interval too long or too short.

2. Dry period too long or too short ...


Heg86-210 Being A 'Grand' Parent, Herbert G. Lingren Jan 1986

Heg86-210 Being A 'Grand' Parent, Herbert G. Lingren

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This guide explores grandparenting, including the benefits derived from being a grandparent, suggestions on how to be a good grandparent, precautions to take when grandchildren come for a visit, and ways to have fun with grandchildren.

Grandparents Today

Approximately 75 percent of Americans over 65 have living grandchildren, according to a 1975 Harris poll. Most grandparents begin their role during middle age. The average age for becoming a grandmother is 46 and may be as early as 32. This means we need to set aside many outdated ideas about grandparent. They are active people. They do not necessarily get around ...


G86-773 How To Evaluate Grain Pricing Opportunities, Lynn H. Lutgen Jan 1986

G86-773 How To Evaluate Grain Pricing Opportunities, Lynn H. Lutgen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This is the last in a series of six NebGuides on agricultural options and discusses "homework" needed to evaluate pricing opportunities.

The market is an ever changing dynamic force. While we recognize this, we also realize that to do a good job of marketing, we must be able to evaluate our pricing opportunities. We must be able to evaluate what the market is offering quickly and efficiently. Evaluating pricing opportunities comes from time spent doing homework throughout the year. If we have done this homework, we can listen to the grain market reports (Chicago futures) on the radio and quickly ...


G86-771 Evaluating Options Vs. Futures Contracts, Lynn H. Lutgen Jan 1986

G86-771 Evaluating Options Vs. Futures Contracts, Lynn H. Lutgen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This is number four in a series of six NebGuides on agricultural options. It explains how to evaluate options vs futures contracts.

Options and futures contracts are similar. Both represent actions that occur in the future. Futures markets are contracts to either accept or deliver the actual physical commodity, while an option contract is a contract on the underlying futures contract. Options contracts give the farmer the right, but not the obligation, to buy or sell an underlying commodity. This underlying commodity is a futures contract. Due to these similarities and the fact that options are based on a futures ...


Ex86-1549 Stinging And Biting Pests Jan 1986

Ex86-1549 Stinging And Biting Pests

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This one-page, four-color extension circular displays photos of the following stinging and biting pests: deer fly, brown recluse spider, American dog tick, mosquito, wheel bug, black widow spider, lo moth larva, yellow jacket, sweat bee, honey bee, and the saddleback caterpillar.

It was prepared by Extension Entomologists of the North Central States in cooperation with the Federal Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.


Ec86-1538 Principal Stored Grain Insects Jan 1986

Ec86-1538 Principal Stored Grain Insects

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This one-page extension circular displays pictures of the following grain insects: Granary weevil, Saw-toothed grain beetle, Red flour beetle, Larger cabinet beetle, Lesser grain borer, Rice weevil, Indian-meal moth, Cadelle, Flat grain beetle, and Angoumois grain moth. Some of these stored grain insects are also kitchen pests.

This publication was prepared by Extension Entomologists of the North Central States in cooperation with the Federal Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.


Ec86-1548 Common Insect Pests Of Trees In The Great Plains, Mary Ellen Dix, Judith E. Pasek, Mark O. Harrell, Frederick P. Baxendale Jan 1986

Ec86-1548 Common Insect Pests Of Trees In The Great Plains, Mary Ellen Dix, Judith E. Pasek, Mark O. Harrell, Frederick P. Baxendale

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication was developed by entomologists on the Pest Management Task Force of the Great Plains Agricultural Council Forestry Committee to provide the public and professionals with information needed to identify and manage common insect pests of trees in the Great Plains. It is designed for those with no formal training in entomology and is not intended to summarize everything known about a particular insect.


Ec86-219 1986 Nebraska Swine Report, Rodger K. Johnson, Dwane R. Zimmerman, M. C. Brumm, David P. Shelton, Keith L. Vacha, J. A. Deshazer, Gerald Bodman, James W. Lamkey, Roger W. Mandigo, Chris R. Calkins, Larry W. Hand, Steven J. Goll, E. R. Peo Jr., Roy Carlson, Austin J. Lewis, Fayrene Hamouz, Lee I. Chiba, Joy L. Kovar, Joel H. Brendemuhl, Alex Hogg, William G. Kvasnicka, Clayton L. Kelling, Duane E. Reese, William Ahlschwede, J. D. Kopf Jan 1986

Ec86-219 1986 Nebraska Swine Report, Rodger K. Johnson, Dwane R. Zimmerman, M. C. Brumm, David P. Shelton, Keith L. Vacha, J. A. Deshazer, Gerald Bodman, James W. Lamkey, Roger W. Mandigo, Chris R. Calkins, Larry W. Hand, Steven J. Goll, E. R. Peo Jr., Roy Carlson, Austin J. Lewis, Fayrene Hamouz, Lee I. Chiba, Joy L. Kovar, Joel H. Brendemuhl, Alex Hogg, William G. Kvasnicka, Clayton L. Kelling, Duane E. Reese, William Ahlschwede, J. D. Kopf

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This 1986 Nebraska Swine Report was prepared by the staff in Animal Science and cooperating departments for use in the Extension and Teaching programs at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Authors from the following areas contributed to this publication: Swine Nutrition, swine diseases, pathology, economics, engineering, swine breeding, meats, agronomy, and diagnostic laboratory. It covers the following areas: breeding, disease control, feeding, nutrition, economics, housing and meats.


G86-807 Where Do Weeds Come From?, John Furrer, Robert G. Wilson Jan 1986

G86-807 Where Do Weeds Come From?, John Furrer, Robert G. Wilson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses weed seed entry and loss from the soil, and provides examples of the density and diversity of the soil weed seed population. Weed Seed in the Soil Most weeds owe their beginning to seed in the soil. The soil acts as a seed storage reservoir and a growth medium for weedy plants. The kind or species and numbers of seed in the soil is closely linked to the cropping history of the land. Grasslands contain seed associated with grassland plants and cropland contains seed affiliated with weeds growing on cultivated land. Grasslands that have been cultivated and ...


Ec86-107 Nebraska Proso Variety Tests, 1986, Lenis Alton Nelson Jan 1986

Ec86-107 Nebraska Proso Variety Tests, 1986, Lenis Alton Nelson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of proso variety trials conducted by the Panhandle Research and Extension Center, High Plains Agricultural Laboratory, and Northwest Agricultural Laboratory. Conduct of experiments and publication of results is a joint effort of the Agricultural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Service.


Ec86-1862 Nebraska Commercial Turfgrass Disease Control Guide For Profession Turfgrass Managers, John E. Watkins, Robert C. Shearman Jan 1986

Ec86-1862 Nebraska Commercial Turfgrass Disease Control Guide For Profession Turfgrass Managers, John E. Watkins, Robert C. Shearman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This extension circular contains four-color photos to help professional turfgrass managers identify the different turfgrass diseases in Nebraska. Tables are included that describe the disease, the common name of fungicides, trade names, and descriptions of how to control these diseases.


Ec86-1244 Vegetable Producction In Nebraska, Ralph E. Neild, Robert B. O'Keefe, David S. Nuland, Joseph O. Young Jan 1986

Ec86-1244 Vegetable Producction In Nebraska, Ralph E. Neild, Robert B. O'Keefe, David S. Nuland, Joseph O. Young

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Vegetable research at the University of Nebraska concerns studies of the culture, processing, mechanization of production and marketing of vegetable crops with the objective of increasing production, quality and use of crops and products process from them.

This circular presents a portion of results from investigations into the production, marketing and processing of vegetables in Nebraska. Information concerning climate, soil and water resources is presented and discussed. Also summarized are results from vegetable yield trials conducted at different locations in the state during the seven-year period 1960-66.


Ec86-113 A Guide For Planning And Analyzing A Year-Round Forage Program, Steven S. Waller, Lowell E. Moser, Bruce Anderson Jan 1986

Ec86-113 A Guide For Planning And Analyzing A Year-Round Forage Program, Steven S. Waller, Lowell E. Moser, Bruce Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Efficient grazing management programs cannot succeed without proper stocing rates. However, proper stocking rate alone will not insure a successful grazing program. Successful grazing management only occurs when all factors affecting production are manipulated properly: season of use; kind, class, and/or combination of animals; grazing distribution; grazing program; fertilization; pest control; and water management as well as stocking rate. The following suggestions in this circular are a guide to initial planning of new pastures and the modification of existing grazing programs.


Ec86-2103 Safe Tractor Operations, Rollin D. Schnieder Jan 1986

Ec86-2103 Safe Tractor Operations, Rollin D. Schnieder

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

No one deliberately has a tractor accident. Nevertheless, every year many farmers are killed or injured on, or because of, their tractors.

The causes of such accidents show that improper operation of the tractor or equipment accounts for the greatest percentage of accidents. Improper operation includes excessive speed, operating under the influence of alcohol and chasing cattle. Other accident causes are driving on too steep an incline and inexperience or immature drivers.

This extension circular contains safety hints on how to operate your farm equipment.


Ec86-1547 Common Fruit Insects Jan 1986

Ec86-1547 Common Fruit Insects

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This 4-color extension circular was prepared by Extension entomologists of the North Central States in cooperation with the Federal Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. This publication shows the following insects:

1. Codling moth adult and larval entry
2. Apple maggot
3. Red-banded leaf roller
4. Green fruitworm
5. Rosy apple aphid
6. San Jose scale
7. Cherry fruit fly maggot
8. Plum curculio adult
9. Two-spotted spider mite
10. Grape berry moth
11. Oriental fruit moth
12. Peach tree borer


Ec86-1545 Common Forage Legume Insects Jan 1986

Ec86-1545 Common Forage Legume Insects

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This 4-color extension circular was prepared by Extension entomologists of the North Central States in cooperation with the Federal Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. This publication shows the following insects:

1. Alfalfa weevil adult, larvae
2. Clover leaf weevil larva
3. Sweetclover weevil
4. Variegated cutworm
5. Grasshopper
6. Green cloverworm
7. Potato leafhopper
8. Meadow spittlebug and nymphs
9. Spotted alfalfa aphid
10. Pea aphid


Ec86-1546 Common Vegetable Insects Jan 1986

Ec86-1546 Common Vegetable Insects

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This 4-color extension circular was prepared by Extension entomologists of the North Central States in cooperation with the Federal Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. This publication shows the following insects:

1. Cabbage looper and imported cabbageworm
2. Cabbage aphid
3. Hornworm
4. Two-spotted spider mite
5. Bean leaf beetle
6. Mexican bean beetle adult, pupa, larvae, eggs
7. Thrips
8. Root maggot
9. Striped cucumber beetle
10. Spotted cucumber beetle
11. Colorado potato beetle
12. Potato flea beetle
13. Potato leafhopper
14. Squash vine borer
15. Squash bug nymphs and adults


Ec86-1542 Corn Insects — Below Ground Jan 1986

Ec86-1542 Corn Insects — Below Ground

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This extension circular was prepared by Extension entomologists of the North Central States in cooperation with the Federal Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. This publication shows the following insects:

1. Corn rootworm adults (Northern, Western and Southern)

2. Corn rootworm larva

3. "Goose-neck" symptoms of corn rootworm infestation

4. Corn rootworm damage

5. Wireworm

6. White grub

7. Black cutworm

8. Corn root aphid

9. Grape colaspis and damage

10. Seedcorn maggot

11. Seedcorn beetle

12. Billbug


Ec86-1543 Common Soybean Insects Jan 1986

Ec86-1543 Common Soybean Insects

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This 4-color extension circular was prepared by Extension entomologists of the North Central States in cooperation with the Federal Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. This publication shows the following insects:

1. Bean leaf beetle.
2. Mexican ean beeetle and larva
3. Japanese beetle
4. Striped blister beetle
5. Green stink bug and damaged seeds
6. Two-spotted mite
7. Thrips
8. Grape colaspis larva
9. Seed maggot
10. White grub
11. Grasshopper
12. Green cloverworm
13. Cabbage looper
14. Garden webworm
15. Corn earworm


Ec86-1541 Corn Insects — Above Ground Jan 1986

Ec86-1541 Corn Insects — Above Ground

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This 4-color extension circular was prepared by Extension entomologists of the North Central States in cooperation with the Federal Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. It shows the following corn insects:

1. European corn borer (early leaf feeding and mature borers)

2. Southwestern corn borer

3. Common stalk borer

4. Chinch bug

5. Corn earworm

6. Armyworm

7. Corn rootworm beetles (lefet to right: Northern, Western, and Southern)

8. Grasshopper

9. Corn leaf aphid

10. Corn flea beetle and damage


Ec86-1540 Common Tree And Shrubs Pests Jan 1986

Ec86-1540 Common Tree And Shrubs Pests

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This 4-color extension circular was prepared by Extension entomologists of the North Central State in cooperation with the Federal Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. This publication shows the following insects:

1. Oystershell scale
2. Maple bladder gall
3. Flatheaded borer
4. Aphid
5. Pine needle scale
6. Bagworm
7. Smaller European elm bark beetle
8. Elm leaf beetle and larvae
9. Eastern tent caterpillar
10. Yellow-necked caterpillar
11. Spruce mite


Ec86-1539 Common Household Pests Jan 1986

Ec86-1539 Common Household Pests

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This 4-color extension circular was prepared by Extension entomologists of the North Central States in cooperation with the Federal Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. This publications shows the following insects:

1. Oriential cockroach 2. American cockroach
3. German cockroach
4. Brown-banded cockroach
5. House fly
6. Black carpet beetle
7. Webbing clothes moth
8. Silverfish
9. Flea
10. Brown dog tick
11. Pavement ant
12. Subterranean termite
13. Powder-post beetle
14. Carpenter ant
15. Boxelder bug