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Series

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

1986

Nutrition

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Education

Mp51 Distillers Grains, Glen Aines, Terry Klopfenstein, Rick Stock Jan 1986

Mp51 Distillers Grains, Glen Aines, Terry Klopfenstein, Rick Stock

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

In the conventional production of alcohol from grain for fuel, byproducts are produced with excellent feeding value for ruminants. Appropriate use of these byproducts aids the efficient production of animals and enhances the economics of alcohol production. In the fermentation of corn to produce alcohol, the starch in the corn is converted to alcohol and carbon dioxide. The nutrients in the corn other than starch are concentrated about three times because corn is about two-thirds starch. Even though starch is high in energy, the one-third of the corn remaining in the byproduct after fermentation contains as much energy per pound ...


G86-814 Using Ram Lambs For Breeding, Ted Doane Jan 1986

G86-814 Using Ram Lambs For Breeding, Ted Doane

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide explains how ram lambs can be most efficiently used in a breeding program and provides management suggestions for a successful program.

Are you planning to use a ram lamb this breeding season? If so, you should consider the capabilities and limitations of ram lambs.

It may be true that some well-grown, aggressive, vigorous, highly fertile ram lambs can settle 50 ewes and maybe more. However, these rams are exceptions. A good rule to follow for practical ram management is 15 to 20 ewes for a ram lamb and 35 to 50 ewes for a mature ram.


G86-821 Weaned Pig Management And Nutrition (Revised August 1992), Duane Reese, Mike Brumm Jan 1986

G86-821 Weaned Pig Management And Nutrition (Revised August 1992), Duane Reese, Mike Brumm

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Temperature, space, health considerations, dietary nutrient allowances, feeding management and more are covered here. The weaning age of pigs farrowed in Nebraska is variable. While the average age at weaning is about four weeks, the range is from two to eight weeks. However, industry surveys indicate that more than 50 percent of the pigs in the United States are weaned at 28 days of age or earlier, with the majority weaned between three and four weeks of age. This trend towards earlier weaning is expected to continue with advances in management, housing, health and nutrition. Earlier weaning (under 28 days ...


G86-797 Causes Of Vaccination-Immunization Failures In Livestock, Duane Rice, E. Denis Erickson, Dale Grotelueschen Jan 1986

G86-797 Causes Of Vaccination-Immunization Failures In Livestock, Duane Rice, E. Denis Erickson, Dale Grotelueschen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses reasons why vaccinations fail to provide immunity against disease, and how to prevent this from happening.

To comprehend the many reasons for vaccine failure, it is important to understand how animals and humans have the ability to resist infectious diseases. It is also important to know what a disease is and how it affects the animal.

According to Stedman's Dictionary, disease is an interruption, cessation or disorder of body functions, systems or organs. Diseases may be obvious even to the untrained eye, or detectable only by sophisticated testing procedures (subclinical disease). Serious irreversible damage may be ...


Ec86-219 1986 Nebraska Swine Report, Rodger K. Johnson, Dwane R. Zimmerman, M. C. Brumm, David P. Shelton, Keith L. Vacha, J. A. Deshazer, Gerald Bodman, James W. Lamkey, Roger W. Mandigo, Chris R. Calkins, Larry W. Hand, Steven J. Goll, E. R. Peo Jr., Roy Carlson, Austin J. Lewis, Fayrene Hamouz, Lee I. Chiba, Joy L. Kovar, Joel H. Brendemuhl, Alex Hogg, William G. Kvasnicka, Clayton L. Kelling, Duane E. Reese, William Ahlschwede, J. D. Kopf Jan 1986

Ec86-219 1986 Nebraska Swine Report, Rodger K. Johnson, Dwane R. Zimmerman, M. C. Brumm, David P. Shelton, Keith L. Vacha, J. A. Deshazer, Gerald Bodman, James W. Lamkey, Roger W. Mandigo, Chris R. Calkins, Larry W. Hand, Steven J. Goll, E. R. Peo Jr., Roy Carlson, Austin J. Lewis, Fayrene Hamouz, Lee I. Chiba, Joy L. Kovar, Joel H. Brendemuhl, Alex Hogg, William G. Kvasnicka, Clayton L. Kelling, Duane E. Reese, William Ahlschwede, J. D. Kopf

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This 1986 Nebraska Swine Report was prepared by the staff in Animal Science and cooperating departments for use in the Extension and Teaching programs at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Authors from the following areas contributed to this publication: Swine Nutrition, swine diseases, pathology, economics, engineering, swine breeding, meats, agronomy, and diagnostic laboratory. It covers the following areas: breeding, disease control, feeding, nutrition, economics, housing and meats.