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Series

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

1986

Life cycle

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Education

G86-792 Spiders, David L. Keith, Stephen D. Danielson, Timothy P. Miller Jan 1986

G86-792 Spiders, David L. Keith, Stephen D. Danielson, Timothy P. Miller

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes the most common species of spiders found in Nebraska, including the black widow and brown recluse, and how to control them.

General Description and Habits

Spiders can be distinguished easily from insects. All spiders have two major body regions and four pair of legs; insects have three body regions and three pair of legs. Spiders vary widely in color, shape, size, and habits. All produce venom that is poisonous to their normal prey. Few spiders are considered dangerous to humans, however. These animals are predacious by nature and use their venom, which is injected through hollow fangs ...


G86-806 Chinch Bug Management (Revised January 1993), Barbara P. Spike, Robert J. Wright, Stephen D. Danielson Jan 1986

G86-806 Chinch Bug Management (Revised January 1993), Barbara P. Spike, Robert J. Wright, Stephen D. Danielson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The life cycle and control of the chinch bug is discussed, with descriptions of possible management options.

The chinch bug is a native North American insect that can destroy cultivated grass crops, especially sorghum and corn, and occasionally small grains, such as wheat and barley. Broad-leaved plants are immune to feeding damage. Crop damage from this insect is most often found in southeast Nebraska and northeast Kansas and is associated with dry weather, especially in the spring and early summer months. Chinch bugs have few effective natural enemies. Ladybird beetles and other common insect predators found in Nebraska prefer to ...


G86-789 Human Lice And Their Control, Shripat T. Kamble, David L. Keith, Wayne L. Kramer Jan 1986

G86-789 Human Lice And Their Control, Shripat T. Kamble, David L. Keith, Wayne L. Kramer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide includes information on biology and control of three species of lice that infest humans.

Pediculosis (lice infestation) in humans has been known since ancient times. Three types of lice that infest humans: 1) head lice, 2) body lice, and 3) crab or pubic lice.

Lice are small, flat, dirty white to grayish black, wingless insects. Their legs are short and stout, with a large claw on each leg for grasping and holding onto hair. Lice have piercing and sucking mouth parts. These insects are blood feeders and require close contact with human hosts.


Ec86-1548 Common Insect Pests Of Trees In The Great Plains, Mary Ellen Dix, Judith E. Pasek, Mark O. Harrell, Frederick P. Baxendale Jan 1986

Ec86-1548 Common Insect Pests Of Trees In The Great Plains, Mary Ellen Dix, Judith E. Pasek, Mark O. Harrell, Frederick P. Baxendale

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication was developed by entomologists on the Pest Management Task Force of the Great Plains Agricultural Council Forestry Committee to provide the public and professionals with information needed to identify and manage common insect pests of trees in the Great Plains. It is designed for those with no formal training in entomology and is not intended to summarize everything known about a particular insect.