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Series

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

1986

Insects

Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Education

G86-792 Spiders, David L. Keith, Stephen D. Danielson, Timothy P. Miller Jan 1986

G86-792 Spiders, David L. Keith, Stephen D. Danielson, Timothy P. Miller

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes the most common species of spiders found in Nebraska, including the black widow and brown recluse, and how to control them.

General Description and Habits

Spiders can be distinguished easily from insects. All spiders have two major body regions and four pair of legs; insects have three body regions and three pair of legs. Spiders vary widely in color, shape, size, and habits. All produce venom that is poisonous to their normal prey. Few spiders are considered dangerous to humans, however. These animals are predacious by nature and use their venom, which is injected through hollow fangs ...


G86-790 Fumigating Farm-Stored Grain With Aluminum Phosphide (Revised May 1998), Clyde Ogg, David L. Keith Jan 1986

G86-790 Fumigating Farm-Stored Grain With Aluminum Phosphide (Revised May 1998), Clyde Ogg, David L. Keith

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide provides step-by-step instructions for fumigating stored grain on the farm with aluminum phosphide.

Fumigants act on all insect life stages. They control pests by diffusing through the air spaces between grain kernels as well as into the kernel itself. Fumigants are able to penetrate into places that are inaccessible to insecticide sprays or dusts.

Regardless of formulation, all fumigants are poisonous and toxic to humans and other warm-blooded animals as well as to insects and other pests. Because fumigant chemicals are highly toxic and hazardous to use, they are Restricted Use pesticides. They can only be used by ...


G86-789 Human Lice And Their Control, Shripat T. Kamble, David L. Keith, Wayne L. Kramer Jan 1986

G86-789 Human Lice And Their Control, Shripat T. Kamble, David L. Keith, Wayne L. Kramer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide includes information on biology and control of three species of lice that infest humans.

Pediculosis (lice infestation) in humans has been known since ancient times. Three types of lice that infest humans: 1) head lice, 2) body lice, and 3) crab or pubic lice.

Lice are small, flat, dirty white to grayish black, wingless insects. Their legs are short and stout, with a large claw on each leg for grasping and holding onto hair. Lice have piercing and sucking mouth parts. These insects are blood feeders and require close contact with human hosts.


Ec86-1538 Principal Stored Grain Insects Jan 1986

Ec86-1538 Principal Stored Grain Insects

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This one-page extension circular displays pictures of the following grain insects: Granary weevil, Saw-toothed grain beetle, Red flour beetle, Larger cabinet beetle, Lesser grain borer, Rice weevil, Indian-meal moth, Cadelle, Flat grain beetle, and Angoumois grain moth. Some of these stored grain insects are also kitchen pests.

This publication was prepared by Extension Entomologists of the North Central States in cooperation with the Federal Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.


Ec86-1547 Common Fruit Insects Jan 1986

Ec86-1547 Common Fruit Insects

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This 4-color extension circular was prepared by Extension entomologists of the North Central States in cooperation with the Federal Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. This publication shows the following insects:

1. Codling moth adult and larval entry
2. Apple maggot
3. Red-banded leaf roller
4. Green fruitworm
5. Rosy apple aphid
6. San Jose scale
7. Cherry fruit fly maggot
8. Plum curculio adult
9. Two-spotted spider mite
10. Grape berry moth
11. Oriental fruit moth
12. Peach tree borer


Ec86-1545 Common Forage Legume Insects Jan 1986

Ec86-1545 Common Forage Legume Insects

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This 4-color extension circular was prepared by Extension entomologists of the North Central States in cooperation with the Federal Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. This publication shows the following insects:

1. Alfalfa weevil adult, larvae
2. Clover leaf weevil larva
3. Sweetclover weevil
4. Variegated cutworm
5. Grasshopper
6. Green cloverworm
7. Potato leafhopper
8. Meadow spittlebug and nymphs
9. Spotted alfalfa aphid
10. Pea aphid


Ec86-1546 Common Vegetable Insects Jan 1986

Ec86-1546 Common Vegetable Insects

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This 4-color extension circular was prepared by Extension entomologists of the North Central States in cooperation with the Federal Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. This publication shows the following insects:

1. Cabbage looper and imported cabbageworm
2. Cabbage aphid
3. Hornworm
4. Two-spotted spider mite
5. Bean leaf beetle
6. Mexican bean beetle adult, pupa, larvae, eggs
7. Thrips
8. Root maggot
9. Striped cucumber beetle
10. Spotted cucumber beetle
11. Colorado potato beetle
12. Potato flea beetle
13. Potato leafhopper
14. Squash vine borer
15. Squash bug nymphs and adults


Ec86-1543 Common Soybean Insects Jan 1986

Ec86-1543 Common Soybean Insects

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This 4-color extension circular was prepared by Extension entomologists of the North Central States in cooperation with the Federal Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. This publication shows the following insects:

1. Bean leaf beetle.
2. Mexican ean beeetle and larva
3. Japanese beetle
4. Striped blister beetle
5. Green stink bug and damaged seeds
6. Two-spotted mite
7. Thrips
8. Grape colaspis larva
9. Seed maggot
10. White grub
11. Grasshopper
12. Green cloverworm
13. Cabbage looper
14. Garden webworm
15. Corn earworm


Ec86-1541 Corn Insects — Above Ground Jan 1986

Ec86-1541 Corn Insects — Above Ground

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This 4-color extension circular was prepared by Extension entomologists of the North Central States in cooperation with the Federal Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. It shows the following corn insects:

1. European corn borer (early leaf feeding and mature borers)

2. Southwestern corn borer

3. Common stalk borer

4. Chinch bug

5. Corn earworm

6. Armyworm

7. Corn rootworm beetles (lefet to right: Northern, Western, and Southern)

8. Grasshopper

9. Corn leaf aphid

10. Corn flea beetle and damage