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Series

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

1986

Field crops

Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Education

G86-796 Growing Degree Day Requirements And Freeze Risk As A Guide To Selecting And Planting Corn Hybrids, Ralph E. Neild Jan 1986

G86-796 Growing Degree Day Requirements And Freeze Risk As A Guide To Selecting And Planting Corn Hybrids, Ralph E. Neild

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the growing degree day requirements for Nebraska's four corn-growing regions, and how using these requirements can aid in planting date decisions.

Variations between locations, between seasons at a particular location, between planting times at a particular location and season, and between the requirements of different hybrids result in differences in the number of days it takes for corn to mature. These variations in days are all closely related to differences in temperatures when the corn is being grown.


G86-782 Distribution Of Crop Residue A Requirement For Conservation Tillage, John A. Smith Jan 1986

G86-782 Distribution Of Crop Residue A Requirement For Conservation Tillage, John A. Smith

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes problems associated with inadequate distribution of crop residue behind the combine, and identifies techniques to obtain proper distribution.

Uniform distribution of crop residue during harvest is essential to the successful use of conservation tillage systems. Crop residue on the soil surface reduces soil erosion and conserves soil moisture. However, the residue must be properly managed to achieve these benefits. Uniform distribution behind the combine is an important part of this management. Large capacity combines equipped with 24- to 30-foot grain platforms and 8- to 12-row corn headers complicate residue distribution. When crop material is collected from a ...


G86-803 Assessing Hail Damage To Corn, J.J. Vorst Jan 1986

G86-803 Assessing Hail Damage To Corn, J.J. Vorst

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication examines how hail damages the corn plant, how the degree of damage can be determined and how the extent of yield loss is estimated.

In the U.S., approximately half of all hailstorms occur between March and May. These early storms are responsible for only minor corn yield losses, however, because the corn either has not yet been planted or is too small to be damaged significantly. Even when fields are severely damaged early in the growing season, they can often be replanted.

On the other hand, about a third of all hailstorms occur between June and September ...


G86-811 High Quality Seed Wheat, Lenis Alton Nelson Jan 1986

G86-811 High Quality Seed Wheat, Lenis Alton Nelson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses high quality winter wheat, the options farmers have in obtaining high quality seed, seed size, year-old seed, seed treatment, and replanting the same seed year after year. Winter wheat uniquely allows the least time between the harvest of one crop and the planting of the next of any annual crop. This short time period may necessitate making a hurried decision about the seed to be planted. In the end, the farmer must be responsible for planting good, high quality seed. The phrase "high quality seed wheat" means different things to different people. High quality wheat seed is ...


G86-812 Sorghum Yield Loss Due To Hail Damage, Charles A. Shapiro, T. A. Peterson Jan 1986

G86-812 Sorghum Yield Loss Due To Hail Damage, Charles A. Shapiro, T. A. Peterson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the methods used by the hail insurance industry to assess yield loss due to hail damage in grain sorghum. A hailstorm can cause yield losses in sorghum ranging from slight to total. Research has been conducted to accurately predict the effects of hail damage on sorghum yields. Results from these studies are used by hail insurance companies to assess yield losses and determine adjustments paid to clients. Information in this NebGuide will acquaint producers with procedures used to assess sorghum hail damage. These procedures may also be useful in estimating crop yields wherever stand loss or defoliation ...


G86-809 Ecofarming: No-Till Sorghum Following Ecofallow Corn Or Sorghum, Robert N. Klein, Gail A. Wicks Jan 1986

G86-809 Ecofarming: No-Till Sorghum Following Ecofallow Corn Or Sorghum, Robert N. Klein, Gail A. Wicks

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes using no-till sorghum in ecofallow rotations, including hybrid selection, planting and weed control methods, fertilizing, and possible insect and disease problems. The ecofarming system using a winter wheat-ecofallow corn or sorghum-fallow rotation has increased corn and sorghum yields because more water is conserved by controlling weeds with herbicides than with tillage. The land is fallowed the year following corn or sorghum and planted to winter wheat in the fall. Often enough precipitation is received during winter and/or early spring that another crop of sorghum could be grown instead of fallowing and planting wheat. If about 2000 ...


Mp51 Distillers Grains, Glen Aines, Terry Klopfenstein, Rick Stock Jan 1986

Mp51 Distillers Grains, Glen Aines, Terry Klopfenstein, Rick Stock

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

In the conventional production of alcohol from grain for fuel, byproducts are produced with excellent feeding value for ruminants. Appropriate use of these byproducts aids the efficient production of animals and enhances the economics of alcohol production. In the fermentation of corn to produce alcohol, the starch in the corn is converted to alcohol and carbon dioxide. The nutrients in the corn other than starch are concentrated about three times because corn is about two-thirds starch. Even though starch is high in energy, the one-third of the corn remaining in the byproduct after fermentation contains as much energy per pound ...


G86-826 Irrigating Alfalfa (Revised October 1990), Delynn Hay Jan 1986

G86-826 Irrigating Alfalfa (Revised October 1990), Delynn Hay

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Alfalfa has certain water use characteristics. Knowing these and how to monitor soil moisture, apply water, manage irrigation, and schedule water application will help you grow a high quality crop. Irrigation makes it possible to grow high quality alfalfa throughout Nebraska on a wide variety of soils. Alfalfa, relatively drought tolerant, will produce yields almost proportional to the amount of water available to the crop. This means that alfalfa will respond favorably to irrigation. Because of its longer growing season, the seasonal water requirement of alfalfa will be higher than for other crops. Irrigation management must consider characteristics such as ...


G86-775 Prussic Acid Poisoning, Norman Shcneider, Bruce Anderson Jan 1986

G86-775 Prussic Acid Poisoning, Norman Shcneider, Bruce Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Prussic acid poisoning and its treatment are discussed in this NebGuide, along with methods to reduce its occurrence.

Sudangrass, forage sorghum, and sorghum-sudangrass hybrids are often used for summer pasture, green chop, hay, or silage. Under certain conditions, livestock consuming these feedstuffs may be poisoned by prussic acid (HCN).

Exposure to excessive prussic acid--also called hydrocyanic acid, hydrogen cyanide, or cyanide--can be fatal. However, producers can manage and feed their livestock to avoid problems with prussic acid.