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Series

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

1986

Farming

Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Education

G86-825 Existing Buildings--Remodel Or Abandon?, Gerald R. Bodman, David P. Shelton Jan 1986

G86-825 Existing Buildings--Remodel Or Abandon?, Gerald R. Bodman, David P. Shelton

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Just because a building is there does not mean that remodeling is the best option. Here are ten factors of prime importance when deciding if a building is suitable for remodeling.

As livestock production enterprises change, many producers ask, "Should I remodel this building or abandon it and start over?" A sound answer requires careful evaluation of the intended use of the building being considered for remodeling. The immediate future and projected long range production goals must be considered. We've all read about successful remodeling projects, but few of us ever hear about the large number of remodeling projects ...


G86-796 Growing Degree Day Requirements And Freeze Risk As A Guide To Selecting And Planting Corn Hybrids, Ralph E. Neild Jan 1986

G86-796 Growing Degree Day Requirements And Freeze Risk As A Guide To Selecting And Planting Corn Hybrids, Ralph E. Neild

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the growing degree day requirements for Nebraska's four corn-growing regions, and how using these requirements can aid in planting date decisions.

Variations between locations, between seasons at a particular location, between planting times at a particular location and season, and between the requirements of different hybrids result in differences in the number of days it takes for corn to mature. These variations in days are all closely related to differences in temperatures when the corn is being grown.


G86-811 High Quality Seed Wheat, Lenis Alton Nelson Jan 1986

G86-811 High Quality Seed Wheat, Lenis Alton Nelson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses high quality winter wheat, the options farmers have in obtaining high quality seed, seed size, year-old seed, seed treatment, and replanting the same seed year after year. Winter wheat uniquely allows the least time between the harvest of one crop and the planting of the next of any annual crop. This short time period may necessitate making a hurried decision about the seed to be planted. In the end, the farmer must be responsible for planting good, high quality seed. The phrase "high quality seed wheat" means different things to different people. High quality wheat seed is ...


G86-812 Sorghum Yield Loss Due To Hail Damage, Charles A. Shapiro, T. A. Peterson Jan 1986

G86-812 Sorghum Yield Loss Due To Hail Damage, Charles A. Shapiro, T. A. Peterson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the methods used by the hail insurance industry to assess yield loss due to hail damage in grain sorghum. A hailstorm can cause yield losses in sorghum ranging from slight to total. Research has been conducted to accurately predict the effects of hail damage on sorghum yields. Results from these studies are used by hail insurance companies to assess yield losses and determine adjustments paid to clients. Information in this NebGuide will acquaint producers with procedures used to assess sorghum hail damage. These procedures may also be useful in estimating crop yields wherever stand loss or defoliation ...


G86-794 Enterotoxemia In Lambs, Dale M. Grotelueschen, Duane N. Rice Jan 1986

G86-794 Enterotoxemia In Lambs, Dale M. Grotelueschen, Duane N. Rice

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the causes, clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention methods of this potentially fatal disease.

Enterotoxemia, which is also known as "overeating" or "pulpy kidney" disease, is a highly significant and costly disease problem for the sheep industry. Proper preventive practices are strongly recommended to sheep producers in order to avoid death loss from this disease.

The word "enterotoxemia" can be broken down into three parts that can be an aid in understanding the disease. The term "entero" refers to intestine; "tox" refers to toxin or poison; and "emia" refers to blood. Thus, from "intestinal toxin in the ...


G86-795 Antibiotic Use In Animals, Duane N. Rice, E. Denis Erickson Jan 1986

G86-795 Antibiotic Use In Animals, Duane N. Rice, E. Denis Erickson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide provides general guidelines about some of the problems that can occur when using antibiotics in treating animals.

Antibiotics are frequently used, and misused, by animal owners in an attempt to remedy disease problems. This use is encouraged by drug company sales efforts, economic pressures, and easy access to the products.

Improper use of antibiotics is costly, detrimental, and may result in: 1) delayed diagnosis; 2) ineffectiveness; 3) toxicity (poisoning); 4) allergic reactions; and 5) drug residue contamination of food animal products.

After evaluating possible benefits and risks, determining whether or not to use antibiotics for treatment depends on ...


G86-820 How To Maximize Income By Managing Days Dry, Jeffrey F. Keown Jan 1986

G86-820 How To Maximize Income By Managing Days Dry, Jeffrey F. Keown

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This guide discusses the benefits of maintaining the optimum calving interval and offers suggestions for accomplishing this reproductive management technique.

Most dairy producers are aware that an optimum calving interval is 365 days. This is a normal lactation length of 305 days with a dry period of 60 days. This interval is often looked at as a goal to strive toward rather than a goal that must be reached to maximize income from the sale of milk.


G86-773 How To Evaluate Grain Pricing Opportunities, Lynn H. Lutgen Jan 1986

G86-773 How To Evaluate Grain Pricing Opportunities, Lynn H. Lutgen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This is the last in a series of six NebGuides on agricultural options and discusses "homework" needed to evaluate pricing opportunities.

The market is an ever changing dynamic force. While we recognize this, we also realize that to do a good job of marketing, we must be able to evaluate our pricing opportunities. We must be able to evaluate what the market is offering quickly and efficiently. Evaluating pricing opportunities comes from time spent doing homework throughout the year. If we have done this homework, we can listen to the grain market reports (Chicago futures) on the radio and quickly ...


G86-771 Evaluating Options Vs. Futures Contracts, Lynn H. Lutgen Jan 1986

G86-771 Evaluating Options Vs. Futures Contracts, Lynn H. Lutgen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This is number four in a series of six NebGuides on agricultural options. It explains how to evaluate options vs futures contracts.

Options and futures contracts are similar. Both represent actions that occur in the future. Futures markets are contracts to either accept or deliver the actual physical commodity, while an option contract is a contract on the underlying futures contract. Options contracts give the farmer the right, but not the obligation, to buy or sell an underlying commodity. This underlying commodity is a futures contract. Due to these similarities and the fact that options are based on a futures ...