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Series

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

1986

Corn

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Education

G86-803 Assessing Hail Damage To Corn, J.J. Vorst Jan 1986

G86-803 Assessing Hail Damage To Corn, J.J. Vorst

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication examines how hail damages the corn plant, how the degree of damage can be determined and how the extent of yield loss is estimated.

In the U.S., approximately half of all hailstorms occur between March and May. These early storms are responsible for only minor corn yield losses, however, because the corn either has not yet been planted or is too small to be damaged significantly. Even when fields are severely damaged early in the growing season, they can often be replanted.

On the other hand, about a third of all hailstorms occur between June and September ...


G86-809 Ecofarming: No-Till Sorghum Following Ecofallow Corn Or Sorghum, Robert N. Klein, Gail A. Wicks Jan 1986

G86-809 Ecofarming: No-Till Sorghum Following Ecofallow Corn Or Sorghum, Robert N. Klein, Gail A. Wicks

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes using no-till sorghum in ecofallow rotations, including hybrid selection, planting and weed control methods, fertilizing, and possible insect and disease problems. The ecofarming system using a winter wheat-ecofallow corn or sorghum-fallow rotation has increased corn and sorghum yields because more water is conserved by controlling weeds with herbicides than with tillage. The land is fallowed the year following corn or sorghum and planted to winter wheat in the fall. Often enough precipitation is received during winter and/or early spring that another crop of sorghum could be grown instead of fallowing and planting wheat. If about 2000 ...


Mp51 Distillers Grains, Glen Aines, Terry Klopfenstein, Rick Stock Jan 1986

Mp51 Distillers Grains, Glen Aines, Terry Klopfenstein, Rick Stock

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

In the conventional production of alcohol from grain for fuel, byproducts are produced with excellent feeding value for ruminants. Appropriate use of these byproducts aids the efficient production of animals and enhances the economics of alcohol production. In the fermentation of corn to produce alcohol, the starch in the corn is converted to alcohol and carbon dioxide. The nutrients in the corn other than starch are concentrated about three times because corn is about two-thirds starch. Even though starch is high in energy, the one-third of the corn remaining in the byproduct after fermentation contains as much energy per pound ...


Ec86-1541 Corn Insects — Above Ground Jan 1986

Ec86-1541 Corn Insects — Above Ground

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This 4-color extension circular was prepared by Extension entomologists of the North Central States in cooperation with the Federal Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. It shows the following corn insects:

1. European corn borer (early leaf feeding and mature borers)

2. Southwestern corn borer

3. Common stalk borer

4. Chinch bug

5. Corn earworm

6. Armyworm

7. Corn rootworm beetles (lefet to right: Northern, Western, and Southern)

8. Grasshopper

9. Corn leaf aphid

10. Corn flea beetle and damage