Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Series

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

1986

Cattle

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Education

G86-799 Health Management And Recommended Vaccinations For Dairy Replacements, Duane Rice, R. Gene White Jan 1986

G86-799 Health Management And Recommended Vaccinations For Dairy Replacements, Duane Rice, R. Gene White

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the importance of having a good vaccination schedule, and provides recommendations on which vaccinations to give, depending on variables. Correct management decisions are necessary to realize maximum returns on investments in any dairy operation. Dairymen sometimes assume there is a quick remedy for health problems, but the prevention of disease is by far less expensive. Preventing health problems in the dairy herd goes much further than using a veterinarian to treat individual animals with emergency problems. A veterinarian with experience and a genuine interest in dairy cattle is essential to assist the dairyman with herd health problems ...


Ec86-113 A Guide For Planning And Analyzing A Year-Round Forage Program, Steven S. Waller, Lowell E. Moser, Bruce Anderson Jan 1986

Ec86-113 A Guide For Planning And Analyzing A Year-Round Forage Program, Steven S. Waller, Lowell E. Moser, Bruce Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Efficient grazing management programs cannot succeed without proper stocing rates. However, proper stocking rate alone will not insure a successful grazing program. Successful grazing management only occurs when all factors affecting production are manipulated properly: season of use; kind, class, and/or combination of animals; grazing distribution; grazing program; fertilization; pest control; and water management as well as stocking rate. The following suggestions in this circular are a guide to initial planning of new pastures and the modification of existing grazing programs.


Ec86-2103 Safe Tractor Operations, Rollin D. Schnieder Jan 1986

Ec86-2103 Safe Tractor Operations, Rollin D. Schnieder

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

No one deliberately has a tractor accident. Nevertheless, every year many farmers are killed or injured on, or because of, their tractors.

The causes of such accidents show that improper operation of the tractor or equipment accounts for the greatest percentage of accidents. Improper operation includes excessive speed, operating under the influence of alcohol and chasing cattle. Other accident causes are driving on too steep an incline and inexperience or immature drivers.

This extension circular contains safety hints on how to operate your farm equipment.