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Series

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

1986

Breeding

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Education

G86-815 Reproductive Problems In Rams, Alan R. Doster, Dale M. Grotelueschen Jan 1986

G86-815 Reproductive Problems In Rams, Alan R. Doster, Dale M. Grotelueschen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Systematic examination of all males to be used for breeding can prevent reproductive failure, minimize nonpregnant ewes, and increase numbers of lambs born early during lambing season.

The importance of using only highly fertile, healthy rams in breeding programs cannot be overemphasized. This is especially true in the case of small producers where only one ram is required. The ram represents an often neglected part of sheep production.


G86-818 How To Use The Milk Progesterone Tests, Larry L. Larson Jan 1986

G86-818 How To Use The Milk Progesterone Tests, Larry L. Larson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This guide discusses the basis for milk progesterone tests, using the test to confirm estrus, as an early indicator of pregnancy, and the availability and costs of kits. Milk progesterone test kits are now commercially available for on-farm use. Correct interpretation of the test results requires accurate estrous detection and good records. Properly used, these tests can help determine (1) if a cow is near estrus and potentially could conceive if bred, or (2) as an early indicator of pregnancy.


G86-820 How To Maximize Income By Managing Days Dry, Jeffrey F. Keown Jan 1986

G86-820 How To Maximize Income By Managing Days Dry, Jeffrey F. Keown

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This guide discusses the benefits of maintaining the optimum calving interval and offers suggestions for accomplishing this reproductive management technique.

Most dairy producers are aware that an optimum calving interval is 365 days. This is a normal lactation length of 305 days with a dry period of 60 days. This interval is often looked at as a goal to strive toward rather than a goal that must be reached to maximize income from the sale of milk.


G86-822 How To Estimate A Dairy Herd's Reproductive Losses, Jeffrey F. Keown Jan 1986

G86-822 How To Estimate A Dairy Herd's Reproductive Losses, Jeffrey F. Keown

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Remedies for herd losses caused by calving interval, dry periods, A.I. performance, and age at first freshening.

One of the major areas of lost income to the dairy producer is in the reproductive performance of the dairy herd. These losses are often overlooked because they are indirect costs. If producers could be given a monthly bill indicating the amount of money that improper reproductive management has cost them, then drastic changes would occur.

The majority of reproductive losses occur in the following areas:

1. Calving interval too long or too short.

2. Dry period too long or too short ...


Ec86-219 1986 Nebraska Swine Report, Rodger K. Johnson, Dwane R. Zimmerman, M. C. Brumm, David P. Shelton, Keith L. Vacha, J. A. Deshazer, Gerald Bodman, James W. Lamkey, Roger W. Mandigo, Chris R. Calkins, Larry W. Hand, Steven J. Goll, E. R. Peo Jr., Roy Carlson, Austin J. Lewis, Fayrene Hamouz, Lee I. Chiba, Joy L. Kovar, Joel H. Brendemuhl, Alex Hogg, William G. Kvasnicka, Clayton L. Kelling, Duane E. Reese, William Ahlschwede, J. D. Kopf Jan 1986

Ec86-219 1986 Nebraska Swine Report, Rodger K. Johnson, Dwane R. Zimmerman, M. C. Brumm, David P. Shelton, Keith L. Vacha, J. A. Deshazer, Gerald Bodman, James W. Lamkey, Roger W. Mandigo, Chris R. Calkins, Larry W. Hand, Steven J. Goll, E. R. Peo Jr., Roy Carlson, Austin J. Lewis, Fayrene Hamouz, Lee I. Chiba, Joy L. Kovar, Joel H. Brendemuhl, Alex Hogg, William G. Kvasnicka, Clayton L. Kelling, Duane E. Reese, William Ahlschwede, J. D. Kopf

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This 1986 Nebraska Swine Report was prepared by the staff in Animal Science and cooperating departments for use in the Extension and Teaching programs at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Authors from the following areas contributed to this publication: Swine Nutrition, swine diseases, pathology, economics, engineering, swine breeding, meats, agronomy, and diagnostic laboratory. It covers the following areas: breeding, disease control, feeding, nutrition, economics, housing and meats.