Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 30 of 57

Full-Text Articles in Education

G86-792 Spiders, David L. Keith, Stephen D. Danielson, Timothy P. Miller Jan 1986

G86-792 Spiders, David L. Keith, Stephen D. Danielson, Timothy P. Miller

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes the most common species of spiders found in Nebraska, including the black widow and brown recluse, and how to control them.

General Description and Habits

Spiders can be distinguished easily from insects. All spiders have two major body regions and four pair of legs; insects have three body regions and three pair of legs. Spiders vary widely in color, shape, size, and habits. All produce venom that is poisonous to their normal prey. Few spiders are considered dangerous to humans, however. These animals are predacious by nature and use their venom, which is injected through hollow fangs ...


G86-790 Fumigating Farm-Stored Grain With Aluminum Phosphide (Revised May 1998), Clyde Ogg, David L. Keith Jan 1986

G86-790 Fumigating Farm-Stored Grain With Aluminum Phosphide (Revised May 1998), Clyde Ogg, David L. Keith

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide provides step-by-step instructions for fumigating stored grain on the farm with aluminum phosphide.

Fumigants act on all insect life stages. They control pests by diffusing through the air spaces between grain kernels as well as into the kernel itself. Fumigants are able to penetrate into places that are inaccessible to insecticide sprays or dusts.

Regardless of formulation, all fumigants are poisonous and toxic to humans and other warm-blooded animals as well as to insects and other pests. Because fumigant chemicals are highly toxic and hazardous to use, they are Restricted Use pesticides. They can only be used by ...


G86-825 Existing Buildings--Remodel Or Abandon?, Gerald R. Bodman, David P. Shelton Jan 1986

G86-825 Existing Buildings--Remodel Or Abandon?, Gerald R. Bodman, David P. Shelton

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Just because a building is there does not mean that remodeling is the best option. Here are ten factors of prime importance when deciding if a building is suitable for remodeling.

As livestock production enterprises change, many producers ask, "Should I remodel this building or abandon it and start over?" A sound answer requires careful evaluation of the intended use of the building being considered for remodeling. The immediate future and projected long range production goals must be considered. We've all read about successful remodeling projects, but few of us ever hear about the large number of remodeling projects ...


G86-772 Using Options To Follow A Rising Market, Lynn H. Lutgen Jan 1986

G86-772 Using Options To Follow A Rising Market, Lynn H. Lutgen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This is number five in a series of six NebGuides on Agricultural Options. It discusses how to use the options market effectively to protect us from our own emotions.

An interesting aspect of marketing is psychological. Many people make a mental decision to market grain when a specific price is reached. However, when the market begins to trend upward and hits that imaginary price level, the farmer previously facing low prices is 1) optimistic for even higher prices, and 2) wants to obtain the highest possible price to offset losses incurred during low prices. What generally happens is 1) no ...


G86-796 Growing Degree Day Requirements And Freeze Risk As A Guide To Selecting And Planting Corn Hybrids, Ralph E. Neild Jan 1986

G86-796 Growing Degree Day Requirements And Freeze Risk As A Guide To Selecting And Planting Corn Hybrids, Ralph E. Neild

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the growing degree day requirements for Nebraska's four corn-growing regions, and how using these requirements can aid in planting date decisions.

Variations between locations, between seasons at a particular location, between planting times at a particular location and season, and between the requirements of different hybrids result in differences in the number of days it takes for corn to mature. These variations in days are all closely related to differences in temperatures when the corn is being grown.


G86-782 Distribution Of Crop Residue A Requirement For Conservation Tillage, John A. Smith Jan 1986

G86-782 Distribution Of Crop Residue A Requirement For Conservation Tillage, John A. Smith

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes problems associated with inadequate distribution of crop residue behind the combine, and identifies techniques to obtain proper distribution.

Uniform distribution of crop residue during harvest is essential to the successful use of conservation tillage systems. Crop residue on the soil surface reduces soil erosion and conserves soil moisture. However, the residue must be properly managed to achieve these benefits. Uniform distribution behind the combine is an important part of this management. Large capacity combines equipped with 24- to 30-foot grain platforms and 8- to 12-row corn headers complicate residue distribution. When crop material is collected from a ...


G86-803 Assessing Hail Damage To Corn, J.J. Vorst Jan 1986

G86-803 Assessing Hail Damage To Corn, J.J. Vorst

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication examines how hail damages the corn plant, how the degree of damage can be determined and how the extent of yield loss is estimated.

In the U.S., approximately half of all hailstorms occur between March and May. These early storms are responsible for only minor corn yield losses, however, because the corn either has not yet been planted or is too small to be damaged significantly. Even when fields are severely damaged early in the growing season, they can often be replanted.

On the other hand, about a third of all hailstorms occur between June and September ...


G86-811 High Quality Seed Wheat, Lenis Alton Nelson Jan 1986

G86-811 High Quality Seed Wheat, Lenis Alton Nelson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses high quality winter wheat, the options farmers have in obtaining high quality seed, seed size, year-old seed, seed treatment, and replanting the same seed year after year. Winter wheat uniquely allows the least time between the harvest of one crop and the planting of the next of any annual crop. This short time period may necessitate making a hurried decision about the seed to be planted. In the end, the farmer must be responsible for planting good, high quality seed. The phrase "high quality seed wheat" means different things to different people. High quality wheat seed is ...


G86-812 Sorghum Yield Loss Due To Hail Damage, Charles A. Shapiro, T. A. Peterson Jan 1986

G86-812 Sorghum Yield Loss Due To Hail Damage, Charles A. Shapiro, T. A. Peterson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the methods used by the hail insurance industry to assess yield loss due to hail damage in grain sorghum. A hailstorm can cause yield losses in sorghum ranging from slight to total. Research has been conducted to accurately predict the effects of hail damage on sorghum yields. Results from these studies are used by hail insurance companies to assess yield losses and determine adjustments paid to clients. Information in this NebGuide will acquaint producers with procedures used to assess sorghum hail damage. These procedures may also be useful in estimating crop yields wherever stand loss or defoliation ...


G86-809 Ecofarming: No-Till Sorghum Following Ecofallow Corn Or Sorghum, Robert N. Klein, Gail A. Wicks Jan 1986

G86-809 Ecofarming: No-Till Sorghum Following Ecofallow Corn Or Sorghum, Robert N. Klein, Gail A. Wicks

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes using no-till sorghum in ecofallow rotations, including hybrid selection, planting and weed control methods, fertilizing, and possible insect and disease problems. The ecofarming system using a winter wheat-ecofallow corn or sorghum-fallow rotation has increased corn and sorghum yields because more water is conserved by controlling weeds with herbicides than with tillage. The land is fallowed the year following corn or sorghum and planted to winter wheat in the fall. Often enough precipitation is received during winter and/or early spring that another crop of sorghum could be grown instead of fallowing and planting wheat. If about 2000 ...


Mp51 Distillers Grains, Glen Aines, Terry Klopfenstein, Rick Stock Jan 1986

Mp51 Distillers Grains, Glen Aines, Terry Klopfenstein, Rick Stock

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

In the conventional production of alcohol from grain for fuel, byproducts are produced with excellent feeding value for ruminants. Appropriate use of these byproducts aids the efficient production of animals and enhances the economics of alcohol production. In the fermentation of corn to produce alcohol, the starch in the corn is converted to alcohol and carbon dioxide. The nutrients in the corn other than starch are concentrated about three times because corn is about two-thirds starch. Even though starch is high in energy, the one-third of the corn remaining in the byproduct after fermentation contains as much energy per pound ...


Heg86-209 Farm And Ranch Family Living Expenses--Taking Control, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue Jan 1986

Heg86-209 Farm And Ranch Family Living Expenses--Taking Control, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes how families with an irregular income can control living expenses through use of a budget and cash flow plan.

Although farm and ranch family living levels have improved and become more comparable to nonfarm families, there will always be some important differences between these families with respect to managing the family living expenses. Income is irregular for many farm and ranch families and, in the past few years, has been insufficient to maintain the farm/ranch and family at a reasonable level of living. This guide is designed to help the farm or ranch family take control ...


Heg86-208 Life Insurance Insights, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue Jan 1986

Heg86-208 Life Insurance Insights, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This guide defines life insurance, its purpose, who needs it, types of policies and companies, how to choose the right insurance, and offers suggestions for policyholders.

Life insurance touches nearly every man, woman and child in the country. Every week of the year, people buy almost a million life insurance policies.


G86-810 Garden Compost (Revised February 1993), Don Steinegger, Donald E. Janssen Jan 1986

G86-810 Garden Compost (Revised February 1993), Don Steinegger, Donald E. Janssen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the advantages of compost, the compost heap, ingredients, uses and instructions for making compost.

Compost is a mixture of partially decomposed plant material and other organic wastes. It is used in the garden to amend soil and fertilize plants.


G86-823 Rock Retaining Wall Construction, Richard K. Sutton, Don Steinegger Jan 1986

G86-823 Rock Retaining Wall Construction, Richard K. Sutton, Don Steinegger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Things to consider when constructing a rock retaining wall.

Each building site has terrain that lends itself to individualized design. Natural slopes, with changes of grade or planned changes in the overall grade may lead to more interesting and pleasing landscapes.

Straight lines or lines lending themselves to square, rectangular, or circular areas tend to develop into a formal landscape. Curved, sweeping lines are less formal and more relaxed. Home landscaping often attempts to develop an informal appearance.

A rock wall can increase the beauty of the site as well as add to the area's utility. Uneven terrain can ...


G86-806 Chinch Bug Management (Revised January 1993), Barbara P. Spike, Robert J. Wright, Stephen D. Danielson Jan 1986

G86-806 Chinch Bug Management (Revised January 1993), Barbara P. Spike, Robert J. Wright, Stephen D. Danielson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The life cycle and control of the chinch bug is discussed, with descriptions of possible management options.

The chinch bug is a native North American insect that can destroy cultivated grass crops, especially sorghum and corn, and occasionally small grains, such as wheat and barley. Broad-leaved plants are immune to feeding damage. Crop damage from this insect is most often found in southeast Nebraska and northeast Kansas and is associated with dry weather, especially in the spring and early summer months. Chinch bugs have few effective natural enemies. Ladybird beetles and other common insect predators found in Nebraska prefer to ...


G86-774 Western Corn Rootworom Soil Insecticide Treatment Decisions Based On Beetle Numbers, J. F. Witkowski, David L. Keith, Zb Mayo Jan 1986

G86-774 Western Corn Rootworom Soil Insecticide Treatment Decisions Based On Beetle Numbers, J. F. Witkowski, David L. Keith, Zb Mayo

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes how counting western corn rootworm beetles throughout the summer can be used to determine the need for insecticide applications the following spring.

Western corn rootworms are one of Nebraska's most serious insect pests of corn. Eggs laid in the soil from late July through September overwinter and begin hatching in late May or early June. Larvae feed on corn roots, causing plants to lodge, and may reduce grain yields. The greatest injury usually occurs from late June to mid-July, when all corn roots may be destroyed if infestations are heavy. Fully grown larvae pupate in the ...


G86-789 Human Lice And Their Control, Shripat T. Kamble, David L. Keith, Wayne L. Kramer Jan 1986

G86-789 Human Lice And Their Control, Shripat T. Kamble, David L. Keith, Wayne L. Kramer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide includes information on biology and control of three species of lice that infest humans.

Pediculosis (lice infestation) in humans has been known since ancient times. Three types of lice that infest humans: 1) head lice, 2) body lice, and 3) crab or pubic lice.

Lice are small, flat, dirty white to grayish black, wingless insects. Their legs are short and stout, with a large claw on each leg for grasping and holding onto hair. Lice have piercing and sucking mouth parts. These insects are blood feeders and require close contact with human hosts.


G86-802 Banvel And 2,4-D Damge To Fieldbeans And Soybeans, Roger G. Wilson, Drew J. Lyon Jan 1986

G86-802 Banvel And 2,4-D Damge To Fieldbeans And Soybeans, Roger G. Wilson, Drew J. Lyon

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the effects of Banvel and 2,4-D on soybean and fieldbean growth and yield. Banvel and 2,4-D are two herbicides commonly used for postemergence control of broadleaf weeds in corn, wheat, sorghum, pastures, and around field margins. Both herbicides can be moved off target by windy conditions at the time of spraying, or they can volatilize after spraying at temperatures above 85°F and drift off target. Fieldbeans and soybeans are both sensitive to Banvel and 2,4-D, and even rates as low as 0.001 lb/acre (1/100th of the use rate) can cause ...


G86-824 Snow Mold Diseases Of Turfgrasses (Revised February 1991), John E. Watkins Jan 1986

G86-824 Snow Mold Diseases Of Turfgrasses (Revised February 1991), John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

How to identify, prevent, and control the principal snow molds of turfgrass in Nebraska.

Principal snow molds of Nebraska turfgrass are Fusarium patch (pink snow mold) and Typhula blight (gray snow mold). Of these two, Fusarium patch is usually the most prevalent and, due to the general lack of continuous snow cover during winter, probably the most damaging. Although snow molds occur on most types of turf grown in Nebraska, fine-leaved turf types are more often seriously injured than coarser lawn grasses.


G86-826 Irrigating Alfalfa (Revised October 1990), Delynn Hay Jan 1986

G86-826 Irrigating Alfalfa (Revised October 1990), Delynn Hay

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Alfalfa has certain water use characteristics. Knowing these and how to monitor soil moisture, apply water, manage irrigation, and schedule water application will help you grow a high quality crop. Irrigation makes it possible to grow high quality alfalfa throughout Nebraska on a wide variety of soils. Alfalfa, relatively drought tolerant, will produce yields almost proportional to the amount of water available to the crop. This means that alfalfa will respond favorably to irrigation. Because of its longer growing season, the seasonal water requirement of alfalfa will be higher than for other crops. Irrigation management must consider characteristics such as ...


G86-775 Prussic Acid Poisoning, Norman Shcneider, Bruce Anderson Jan 1986

G86-775 Prussic Acid Poisoning, Norman Shcneider, Bruce Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Prussic acid poisoning and its treatment are discussed in this NebGuide, along with methods to reduce its occurrence.

Sudangrass, forage sorghum, and sorghum-sudangrass hybrids are often used for summer pasture, green chop, hay, or silage. Under certain conditions, livestock consuming these feedstuffs may be poisoned by prussic acid (HCN).

Exposure to excessive prussic acid--also called hydrocyanic acid, hydrogen cyanide, or cyanide--can be fatal. However, producers can manage and feed their livestock to avoid problems with prussic acid.


G86-814 Using Ram Lambs For Breeding, Ted Doane Jan 1986

G86-814 Using Ram Lambs For Breeding, Ted Doane

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide explains how ram lambs can be most efficiently used in a breeding program and provides management suggestions for a successful program.

Are you planning to use a ram lamb this breeding season? If so, you should consider the capabilities and limitations of ram lambs.

It may be true that some well-grown, aggressive, vigorous, highly fertile ram lambs can settle 50 ewes and maybe more. However, these rams are exceptions. A good rule to follow for practical ram management is 15 to 20 ewes for a ram lamb and 35 to 50 ewes for a mature ram.


G86-815 Reproductive Problems In Rams, Alan R. Doster, Dale M. Grotelueschen Jan 1986

G86-815 Reproductive Problems In Rams, Alan R. Doster, Dale M. Grotelueschen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Systematic examination of all males to be used for breeding can prevent reproductive failure, minimize nonpregnant ewes, and increase numbers of lambs born early during lambing season.

The importance of using only highly fertile, healthy rams in breeding programs cannot be overemphasized. This is especially true in the case of small producers where only one ram is required. The ram represents an often neglected part of sheep production.


G86-821 Weaned Pig Management And Nutrition (Revised August 1992), Duane Reese, Mike Brumm Jan 1986

G86-821 Weaned Pig Management And Nutrition (Revised August 1992), Duane Reese, Mike Brumm

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Temperature, space, health considerations, dietary nutrient allowances, feeding management and more are covered here. The weaning age of pigs farrowed in Nebraska is variable. While the average age at weaning is about four weeks, the range is from two to eight weeks. However, industry surveys indicate that more than 50 percent of the pigs in the United States are weaned at 28 days of age or earlier, with the majority weaned between three and four weeks of age. This trend towards earlier weaning is expected to continue with advances in management, housing, health and nutrition. Earlier weaning (under 28 days ...


Heg86-205 Sewing Ups And Downs: Placement Of Fabric And/Or Garment Pieces For Machine Sewing, Anna Marie White Jan 1986

Heg86-205 Sewing Ups And Downs: Placement Of Fabric And/Or Garment Pieces For Machine Sewing, Anna Marie White

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes how to position fabric and garment pieces during construction to facilitate sewing and achieve a more professional look.

Sewing, like much of life, has its ups and downs. Sewing ups and downs might be thought of as successes or frustrations, but the ups and downs referred to here are intended to prevent frustration at the sewing machine during garment construction.


G86-799 Health Management And Recommended Vaccinations For Dairy Replacements, Duane Rice, R. Gene White Jan 1986

G86-799 Health Management And Recommended Vaccinations For Dairy Replacements, Duane Rice, R. Gene White

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the importance of having a good vaccination schedule, and provides recommendations on which vaccinations to give, depending on variables. Correct management decisions are necessary to realize maximum returns on investments in any dairy operation. Dairymen sometimes assume there is a quick remedy for health problems, but the prevention of disease is by far less expensive. Preventing health problems in the dairy herd goes much further than using a veterinarian to treat individual animals with emergency problems. A veterinarian with experience and a genuine interest in dairy cattle is essential to assist the dairyman with herd health problems ...


G86-794 Enterotoxemia In Lambs, Dale M. Grotelueschen, Duane N. Rice Jan 1986

G86-794 Enterotoxemia In Lambs, Dale M. Grotelueschen, Duane N. Rice

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the causes, clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention methods of this potentially fatal disease.

Enterotoxemia, which is also known as "overeating" or "pulpy kidney" disease, is a highly significant and costly disease problem for the sheep industry. Proper preventive practices are strongly recommended to sheep producers in order to avoid death loss from this disease.

The word "enterotoxemia" can be broken down into three parts that can be an aid in understanding the disease. The term "entero" refers to intestine; "tox" refers to toxin or poison; and "emia" refers to blood. Thus, from "intestinal toxin in the ...


G86-795 Antibiotic Use In Animals, Duane N. Rice, E. Denis Erickson Jan 1986

G86-795 Antibiotic Use In Animals, Duane N. Rice, E. Denis Erickson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide provides general guidelines about some of the problems that can occur when using antibiotics in treating animals.

Antibiotics are frequently used, and misused, by animal owners in an attempt to remedy disease problems. This use is encouraged by drug company sales efforts, economic pressures, and easy access to the products.

Improper use of antibiotics is costly, detrimental, and may result in: 1) delayed diagnosis; 2) ineffectiveness; 3) toxicity (poisoning); 4) allergic reactions; and 5) drug residue contamination of food animal products.

After evaluating possible benefits and risks, determining whether or not to use antibiotics for treatment depends on ...


G86-797 Causes Of Vaccination-Immunization Failures In Livestock, Duane Rice, E. Denis Erickson, Dale Grotelueschen Jan 1986

G86-797 Causes Of Vaccination-Immunization Failures In Livestock, Duane Rice, E. Denis Erickson, Dale Grotelueschen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses reasons why vaccinations fail to provide immunity against disease, and how to prevent this from happening.

To comprehend the many reasons for vaccine failure, it is important to understand how animals and humans have the ability to resist infectious diseases. It is also important to know what a disease is and how it affects the animal.

According to Stedman's Dictionary, disease is an interruption, cessation or disorder of body functions, systems or organs. Diseases may be obvious even to the untrained eye, or detectable only by sophisticated testing procedures (subclinical disease). Serious irreversible damage may be ...