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Full-Text Articles in Education

Ec81-1869 Guide To The Identification Of Physiological Disorders Of Landscape Plants, John E. Watkins, Donald H. Steinegger Jan 1981

Ec81-1869 Guide To The Identification Of Physiological Disorders Of Landscape Plants, John E. Watkins, Donald H. Steinegger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Physiological disorders are plant diseases caused by non-living agents. Other terms for this group of disorders are abiotic diseases or noninfectious diseases.

Physiological disorders are often confused with pathogen-caused diseases but they do not spread from plant to plant as do diseases caused by living organisms. Landscape plants are often exposed to toxic materials, mechanical damage, nutritional stress, homeowner neglect and other stress factors in the urban environment.

This 4-color extension publication highlights the following physiological disorders of landscape plants: sun scald, drought, lightning injury, winter injury, root girdling, iron chlorosis, salt injury, herbicide injury and air pollution.


Ec81-1240 Vegetable Gardening In Nebraska, Dale T. Lindgren, Laurie Hodges, Don Steinegger, Ralph E. Neild Jan 1981

Ec81-1240 Vegetable Gardening In Nebraska, Dale T. Lindgren, Laurie Hodges, Don Steinegger, Ralph E. Neild

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Nebraskans are increasing their consumption of fresh vegetables — as appetizers, salads, side dishes, and snacks. Fresh vegetables are an integral part of a healthy, well-balanced diet. Although Nebraska's climate and soil are well-suited for many vegetables, most are supplied from out of the state, even during summer. Growing fresh vegetables can provide higher nutrition and flavor at less expense than buying fresh produce at the grocery store. A garden also can be a source of personal enjoyment and satisfaction.

This extension circular helps the gardener decide when, where, and how to plant and maintain a vegetable garden.


Ec81-219, 1981 Nebraska Swine Report, D.B. Hudman, Donald L. Ferguson, D.M. Danielson, Robert M. Timm, Duane E. Reese, Bobby D. Moser, Alex Hogg, Michael F. Kocher, Gerald Bodman, Eugene J. Veburg, J.A. Deshazer, Dennis D. Schulte, Austin J. Lewis, Larry Bitney, E.R. Peo Jr., Kelly Keaschall, Roger W. Mandigo, T.S. Janssen, M.L. Lesiak, D.G. Olson, M. C. Brumm, M.P. Mcginley, William Ahlschwede, Dwane R. Zimmerman Jan 1981

Ec81-219, 1981 Nebraska Swine Report, D.B. Hudman, Donald L. Ferguson, D.M. Danielson, Robert M. Timm, Duane E. Reese, Bobby D. Moser, Alex Hogg, Michael F. Kocher, Gerald Bodman, Eugene J. Veburg, J.A. Deshazer, Dennis D. Schulte, Austin J. Lewis, Larry Bitney, E.R. Peo Jr., Kelly Keaschall, Roger W. Mandigo, T.S. Janssen, M.L. Lesiak, D.G. Olson, M. C. Brumm, M.P. Mcginley, William Ahlschwede, Dwane R. Zimmerman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This 1981 Nebraska Swine Report was prepared by the staff in Animal Science and cooperating departments for use in the Extension and Teaching programs at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Authors from the following areas contributed to this publication: Swine Nutrition, swine diseases, pathology, economics, engineering, swine breeding, meats, agronomy, and diagnostic laboratory. It covers the following areas: breeding, disease control, feeding, nutrition, economics, housing and meats.