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Series

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

1981

Weeds

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Education

G81-546 Ecofarming: Fallow Aids In Winter Wheat-Fallow Rotation, Gail A. Wicks, Charles R. Fenster Jan 1981

G81-546 Ecofarming: Fallow Aids In Winter Wheat-Fallow Rotation, Gail A. Wicks, Charles R. Fenster

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the use of ecofarming to control weeds and manage crop residues.

Ecofarming is defined as a system of controlling weeds and managing crop residues throughout a crop rotation with minimum use of tillage so as to reduce soil erosion and production costs while increasing weed control, water infiltration, moisture conservation and crop yields. Energy requirements are much lower with ecofallow than with normal fallow systems. The ecofallow period in the 3-year rotation is the period between wheat or other small grain harvest and the planting of corn or sorghum. The fallow period in the 2-year rotation occurs ...


G81-543 Establishing Dryland Forage Grasses, Bruce Anderson Jan 1981

G81-543 Establishing Dryland Forage Grasses, Bruce Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Preparation, seed selection, seedbed preparation, fertilization, methods of seeding, time and rate of seeding, weed control and more are covered in this NebGuide.

Grass pastures provide more total nutrients to the cattle and sheep industry in Nebraska than any other feedstuff. However, many areas often face a shortage of pasture during certain seasons of the year.

In eastern Nebraska abundant cool-season pasture usually is available during spring and fail, but during July and August there is little or no grass growth. Conversely, warm-season native range provides much forage during summer in central and western Nebraska, but not in spring and ...


G81-562 Guidelines For Using Pipewick And Other Selective Applicators, William E. Lueschen, Alex R. Martin, John D. Furrer Jan 1981

G81-562 Guidelines For Using Pipewick And Other Selective Applicators, William E. Lueschen, Alex R. Martin, John D. Furrer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The use of selective applicators is being rapidly adopted by farmers to supplement their weed control programs. A low-cost method of removing tall, escaped weeds from short stature crops, selective application is also environmentally appealing since the herbicide is applied only to the target weeds and thus only small amounts of herbicides are used.

There are three basic types of applicators available: ropewicks, recirculating sprayers (RCS), and carpeted rollers. This NebGuide discusses each applicator and how it can be used on the farm.