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Series

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

1981

Weed control

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Education

G81-540 Peppers (Revised May 1990), Dale T. Lindgren, Laurie Hodges Jan 1981

G81-540 Peppers (Revised May 1990), Dale T. Lindgren, Laurie Hodges

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Various peppers and their care are discussed here.

Peppers are treated as warm-season annual crops when grown in Nebraska gardens. They are related to eggplants, potatoes and tomatoes, all of which belong to the Solanaceae (Nightshade) family.


G81-551 Ecofarming: Spring Row Crop Planting And Weed Control In Winter Wheat Stubble, Gail A. Wicks, Norman L. Klocke Jan 1981

G81-551 Ecofarming: Spring Row Crop Planting And Weed Control In Winter Wheat Stubble, Gail A. Wicks, Norman L. Klocke

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Weed control, stubble management and planters for planting in winter wheat stubble are covered here.

Planting corn, sorghum or soybeans into untilled, weed-free winter wheat stubble that is 10 months old is an accepted practice in the Central Great Plains States. In Nebraska, this system is known as ecofallow. Treating the stubble with herbicides following wheat harvest (ecofallow) offers several advantages:

Weed and volunteer wheat growth can be eliminated. Weed growth robs valuable moisture that could be used by the next year's crop.

Standing stubble provides an excellent snow trap during the winter. Snow melt can provide moisture for ...


G81-546 Ecofarming: Fallow Aids In Winter Wheat-Fallow Rotation, Gail A. Wicks, Charles R. Fenster Jan 1981

G81-546 Ecofarming: Fallow Aids In Winter Wheat-Fallow Rotation, Gail A. Wicks, Charles R. Fenster

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the use of ecofarming to control weeds and manage crop residues.

Ecofarming is defined as a system of controlling weeds and managing crop residues throughout a crop rotation with minimum use of tillage so as to reduce soil erosion and production costs while increasing weed control, water infiltration, moisture conservation and crop yields. Energy requirements are much lower with ecofallow than with normal fallow systems. The ecofallow period in the 3-year rotation is the period between wheat or other small grain harvest and the planting of corn or sorghum. The fallow period in the 2-year rotation occurs ...


G81-543 Establishing Dryland Forage Grasses, Bruce Anderson Jan 1981

G81-543 Establishing Dryland Forage Grasses, Bruce Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Preparation, seed selection, seedbed preparation, fertilization, methods of seeding, time and rate of seeding, weed control and more are covered in this NebGuide.

Grass pastures provide more total nutrients to the cattle and sheep industry in Nebraska than any other feedstuff. However, many areas often face a shortage of pasture during certain seasons of the year.

In eastern Nebraska abundant cool-season pasture usually is available during spring and fail, but during July and August there is little or no grass growth. Conversely, warm-season native range provides much forage during summer in central and western Nebraska, but not in spring and ...


Ec81-1240 Vegetable Gardening In Nebraska, Dale T. Lindgren, Laurie Hodges, Don Steinegger, Ralph E. Neild Jan 1981

Ec81-1240 Vegetable Gardening In Nebraska, Dale T. Lindgren, Laurie Hodges, Don Steinegger, Ralph E. Neild

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Nebraskans are increasing their consumption of fresh vegetables — as appetizers, salads, side dishes, and snacks. Fresh vegetables are an integral part of a healthy, well-balanced diet. Although Nebraska's climate and soil are well-suited for many vegetables, most are supplied from out of the state, even during summer. Growing fresh vegetables can provide higher nutrition and flavor at less expense than buying fresh produce at the grocery store. A garden also can be a source of personal enjoyment and satisfaction.

This extension circular helps the gardener decide when, where, and how to plant and maintain a vegetable garden.